Moving failing/beaten tulips now?

shadara(5b-6a)May 17, 2009

We had some nice yellow and white tulips in North patio gardens. This year they aren't doing so hot. Half of them never formed blooms and they got pretty beaten up by the storm last week. I'm guessing that they aren't getting enough sun, sandy soil isn't so great, and we'd like to move them to a better place.

Questions are: Will they survive and come back next spring if we transplant them now? Is there anything special to do before/during/after moving them?

My mom has a nice bulb garden that she has to rearrange with daffs and tulips that seem to do good there. So once those are done blooming, can we dig up and rearrange in a better display? (they are kinda bunched here and there right now and looks crappy).

Thanks for any input or advice! (you can see example below thru link)

Here is a link that might be useful: NE garden disaster

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ladychroe(z6 NJ)

Most tulips aren't reliably perennial and only last a year or two. I plant more every year and if they do come back, I see it as a bonus. Sorry!

    Bookmark   May 19, 2009 at 9:27PM
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Chemocurl zn5b/6a Indiana(zone 5/6)

Will they survive and come back next spring if we transplant them now? Is there anything special to do before/during/after moving them?
It would be best if you were to leave them until the foliage has dies back a good bit, maybe about 6 weeks after the bloom has faded.

Then dig your bulbs and allow them to air dry (in the shade somewhere) before storing (cool and dry) for planting this fall. Fall bulbs moved in the spring run the risk of rotting due to warm soil temps and moisture. Bulbs dug before the foliage has faded will likely not bloom next year, as it is the fading foliage that feeds the bulb for next years bloom.

Also, as lady said above, most are not very perennial. It has been discussed here that maybe they would be more likely to bloom the next year if they were lifted after the foliage dies back, and then replanted in the fall after soil temps have cooled.

Sue

    Bookmark   May 20, 2009 at 11:39AM
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