Old, tired Globemaster allium bulbs

auntlavender(Chicago/Zone5)May 24, 2014

The big, beautiful Allium Globemaster bulbs that were planted in my garden when I moved here ten years ago are now a shadow of their former selves--they're so much smaller and spindly, even.

I understand bulbs can lose their vigor after a time, and I have babied them with compost after they flower, is there any way to bring them back to their former glory? Is it doable to try and grow new ones from the seeds? If so, they still be "globemaster"?

Thank you.

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southerngardening24(7b)

I would dig them up and divide them.

    Bookmark   May 24, 2014 at 11:05PM
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auntlavender(Chicago/Zone5)

Can I do this after they flower and the leaves die back?

    Bookmark   May 25, 2014 at 12:24PM
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katob Z6ish, NE Pa

Yup, perfect time to do it is after the leaves yellow. Dig some of that compost down to where the bulbs are planted and they should bulk up again. I like to replant in a new spot since it seems some plants tire out the soil and will do well moving around every few years.

    Bookmark   May 25, 2014 at 3:57PM
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auntlavender(Chicago/Zone5)

Thank you. I would love to do what I can to rejuvenate these as new ones are pricey. I was thinking of moving them anyway.

    Bookmark   May 25, 2014 at 7:27PM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

Over time, the growth of trees can make more shade on an area that had more sun a decade before. Maybe a factor?

    Bookmark   May 27, 2014 at 9:36AM
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auntlavender(Chicago/Zone5)

Why yes---a giant pine has been steadily getting bigger these ten years. Time for dividing and moving.

    Bookmark   May 27, 2014 at 11:47PM
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ontnative(5b Can/USDA 4)

Globemaster will not reproduce from seeds, as it is a sterile cultivar. Probably why they are so expensive. The bulbs split in half, and can be carefully separated and replanted in a sunnier spot. Given some time to adjust, they should bloom well for you again.

    Bookmark   June 15, 2014 at 9:37AM
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