moving poppy anemones

dianne0712(7)October 20, 2012

I planted some gorgeous blue poppy anemones about 6 years ago. Now we have built a porch across the front door and they are in the wrong place. I've heard they shouldn't be moved, but I really have to. I can't seem to find any more for sale in Canada, only mixed shades which will clash with my house. These are my favourites and I really want to keep them. Does anyone know how and when to move these?

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KristiePDX(8b, sunset 6)

I have never moved mine BUT..... I know after they fade and foliage die they are impossible to find as they look like crumbles of dirt when dormant. Mine are sending out green leaves right now. I would say that it would be ok to scoop each plant with a little bit of the surrounding dirt. They should have enough time to re-settle themselves and bloom next spring.

    Bookmark   October 20, 2012 at 8:40PM
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RadiantPoppy(7)

Whatever you do there are three good things to remember:
1. Those bulbs were in a package to begin with so they can't be all that bad about being transplanted - they already experienced it once.
2. The rule of thumb for transplanting anything is to have it out of the ground (or out of the conditions in which it will be stored) for as little time as possible.
3. All bulbs/corms/etc transplant best as soon as the foliage dies back completely. (And it is easiest to spot them when the yellow/brown twigs and leaves are still attached - less chance of slicing them with your shovel.)

I know it's not as specific as you are looking for, but I would say it sounds about right. And actually that should be enough information to get the job done and keep them alive.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2012 at 8:19PM
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cynthianovak

I have lifted them out of the ground, left them on a cardboard flat and planted them again several months later.

Anemones don't all make it. If you have some foliage above ground I think that you should be able to transplant them most easily. But if you miss that opportunity and can find the little buggers...they are not fussy at all.
c

    Bookmark   November 12, 2012 at 10:10PM
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vetivert8(NI-NZ zone 9a)

I bought some corms late (on special). I planted them in a shallow flat quite thickly as there were 25 in the packet.

I left them to sprout and, as the leaves came through, I transplanted them into deeper containers and let them grow on. Most survived and they are still flowering (southern hemisphere).

Provided your final bed for them is well prepared before you close down for winter, I'd wait until they show up in early spring and transplant 'in the green' (with their leaves emerging), with a generous amount of dirt around their roots, to their new bed. Firm in and water lightly.

As your spring frosts are probably snappier than ours I think I'd provide a cloche/fleece to offset any chilly nights and prevent any frost heave.

By doing so while they are in active growth you can 'catch the season's benefits' (they WANT to grow!) and any slight harm will be offset by spring surge in roots/leaves.

On the 'just in case I lose some' insurance step - mark several with 'no bird will ever move these' tags while they are growing, and lift, as has been suggested, when the foliage is starting to die back.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2012 at 3:41AM
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