Lime use in 511

nycgarden(6)April 3, 2013

Gardening class mentioned dissolving the lime in water before adding it to a mix to hasten absorption. Any downside to this method of adding lime to 511?

Thanks,
Dan

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

I feel that the Lime is spread more evenly throughout if I sprinkle the powder over the moist mix as I turn it.

Josh

    Bookmark   April 3, 2013 at 3:38PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maple_grove_gw

Are you interested in lime's properties as a base (to neutralize the pine bark), or as a nutrient?

I always thought that one of the advantages of lime in 5:1:1 is that it dissolves very slowly. Every watering will only dissolve a tiny fraction of the lime that is mixed throughout the container, thus it is acting as a slow-release form of Ca and Mg. If you get it all dissolved and add it as a solution, then you're using it more as a like a CalMag fertilizer (albeit a very concentrated one). It will adsorb onto the medium to the extent that the medium is capable of cation exchange, but the rest will wash through. During subsequent waterings, the amount that is adsorbed to the medium will also be washed away rather quickly.

In other words, if you apply it as a solution, you'll get more rapid pH adjustment, but you won't have a long-lasting source of calcium and magnesium. I would think that the negative effects would outweight the positive ones. Keep in mind that the pH of the medium is not nearly as important of the pH of the water used to fertigate.

Alex

    Bookmark   April 4, 2013 at 12:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
DWD2(10a, Sunset 17)

Dan, It depends on the type of lime you are using. If you are talking about dolomitic lime, it will take a fair bit of acid to dissolve it into solution. You want the lime in your mix to buffer the acid of the pine bark and peat moss. As Alex points out, it also serves as a source of Ca++ and Mg++. But most of the Ca++ & Mg++ would pour through after your CEC is consumed. So, you would lose 2 benefits. You may find this paper on liming materials helpful:
http://www.soils.wisc.edu/extension/pubs/A3671.pdf

    Bookmark   April 5, 2013 at 2:54AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
CONTAINER SOILS - WATER MOVEMENT and RETENTION XXII
Hello! Houzz's new format has presented some challenges,...
tapla (mid-MI z5b-6a)
Best glue for terracotta pots?
Yes I did. Left some of my pots outside and now they...
keepingon
Root bound jasmine separation
HI.. It is a first time I disturbed a rootball of...
amriteanukul112
Soil for elephant ear plant?
I'm getting ready to plant an elephant ear plant in...
bunky_mi
What size pot to use for sweet potatoes
Would someone please tell me what size pot I can grow...
zzackey
Sponsored Products
100-Watt Transformer With Photocell And Timer
$76.91 | Lamps Plus
Cascada White Boudoir 12x16 5oz Pillow
$41.00 | Bellacor
Serena & Lily Carson Counter Stool
Serena & Lily
TRIBECCA HOME Canterbury Louis Phillip White Queen-size Sleigh Bed
Overstock.com
Talon 2,000w Inverter Gas Generator
Overstock.com
Commercial Zone 25 Gallon Trash Can with Open Top - 781801
$299.00 | Hayneedle
Trio Pint Ice Off-White Bucket
$69.50 | FRONTGATE
Porcelina Matte Black LED 14-Inch Round Bowl Pendant with Flat Bars and Finial
$600.00 | Bellacor
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™