size and depth of container needed

kinook(4b)April 1, 2011

can I grow vegetables and strawberries in a container 12 inches wide by 14 inches long and 6 inches deep if so which types would be ok. (in a greenhouse)

Thank you

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jodik_gw

You'd want to choose plant types with shallow root systems... so many of your larger vegetable choices would be taken off the table... such as most tomato types, carrots, etc...

I'm not a consummate vegetable grower, but I'd probably choose seed types that were recommended for container growth... like your Tom Thumb cherry tomatoes that can be grown in hanging baskets. Certain types of sprouts and lettuce might be good choices... or bush type vegetables... green peppers, perhaps... beans, bush type... etc...

I wish I could help further... perhaps some of our more illustrious vegetable growers will chime in with variety names... or, you could check the forums dedicated to vegetable growing...

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 10:56AM
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tempusflits

I don't know about growing in a greenhouse, but if you're interested in growing vegetables in containers, I recommend you read McGree and Stuckey's The Bountiful Container. The book covers the varieties to grow, the size pots needed, how to fertilize, and an all around discussion of container vegetable gardening. I'm neither Stuckey nor McGree, nor am I related to them. I just love the book. Maybe it is available at your library, and if that one isn't, perhaps another one would work. Anyway, I found it way beyond helpful.

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 1:16PM
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greenman28 NorCal 7b/8a

I have friends who grow herbs in similar containers - sage, oregano, thyme, chives, dill, et cetera.
They grow Jalapenos, green onions, garlic, and fingerling carrots in small solo containers, as well.
It works somewhat, but the plants are smaller in stature and the harvest is limited.

Josh

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 2:18PM
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jodik_gw

That would be my main concern... amount of total harvest. I think that unless you're planning on planting a LOT of smaller containers, it might not be worth your while... unless you live and eat alone. ;-)

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 8:56PM
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tempusflits

Ah, those of you who have the strength and soil to grow vegetables in ground, how I envy you. There is nothing better than fresh produce, IMHO.

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 5:08AM
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jodik_gw

I agree... I like knowing exactly how my produce is grown, what it's fertilized with, what sort of chemicals are used on it, how it's handled from garden to plate. And I like that it's picked when ripe, and not picked ahead of time because it has to be shipped a thousand miles to reach its destination, to sit on some store produce department shelf.

Plus, there's nothing quite like the satisfaction of picking fresh fruits and vegetables you've grown yourself... and the wonderful flavor of home grown!

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 10:15AM
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kinook(4b)

Thank you very much for all your valuable input,I will have to change my plans and go with a deeper container

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 3:36PM
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