Capel Manor College Self-Watering Pot

doug_e_fresh(ZONE 3)April 24, 2012

Hello Everyone,

I hope someone maybe able to assist me with a few questions concerning self-watering containers. I saw this clip from video jug concerning creation of a simple self watering pot.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-a-self-watering-container

Has anyone seen this before or this kind of concept for a self watering container?

Would this design work well?

I find it hard to find nice pots to use on a desk and such that are without drainage might anyone know how I could locate planters that specifically do not have drainage holes? Is there a certain term to make searching easier?

If this design is adequate as a self-watering pot I bet a I need a good wicking soil whats a simple solution for that?

That last one is a loaded question based on brief research but all I am looking for is something that will get the job done that I can easily find and buy as a all-in-one bag soil or easily mix up something suitable to do the job. I am not looking for the best.

If any of this has been brought up and answered please point me in the right direction. I did some searching but came up either empty or buried in half answers.

Thanks,

Doug

Here is a link that might be useful: Capel Manor College Self-Watering Pot

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jala4260(10a)

Have you seen the self-watering pots sold in Home Depot or Walmart?

There is an saucer that holds quite a bit of water and when attached looks seamlessly part of the container. There is a + shape on bottom container that you can fit many pebbles like the concept in the video and you can water into the hole at the bottom. Not too useless since you want to water from the top -- I personally use the saucer as a drainage container and an battery liquid transfer pump to pump out of the excess water.

Home Depot carries it in Red (terra cotta color) with the brand Spa and Walmart carries it in Green with brand Mainstays. Both are from same manufacturer.

Link to Walmart Website:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-5.2-Self-Watering-Planter/16630836

I prefer green and pure white pots as they do not distract from the plant. Red sticks out too much in my opinion.

    Bookmark   April 25, 2012 at 2:43AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
doug_e_fresh(ZONE 3)

Yes perhaps your right. Maybe I am over-thinking this to much and only giving credit to more complicated design projects. but I think the Walmart pot might not hold enough water for me. Also I like more variety for planter designs. I just don't want something so plain. oh well I guess I am just too picky.

I have a Gardener's Supply near me and they sell some Self-Watering Container Mix. I think I am going to give this project a try and if it goes well I will post results.

Thanks,
Doug

    Bookmark   April 25, 2012 at 12:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jala4260(10a)

Go check out the pots at Walmart, you might be surprised. They actually hold quite a bit of water depending on the container size. Largest they have is 16.7 diameter inch pot in my area. A houseplant indoors might sit in that water for a month if you filled it up.

I don't believe in "self-watering" as your soil sits damp which is supposedly not healthy for the plant (root) growth unless your growing aquatic plants.

But you insist on self-watering, which might be a good choice in busy environments and schedules where you have co-workers who have little knowledge or don't pay attention to watering the plants. The water reservoir is an easy indicator.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2012 at 12:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
doug_e_fresh(ZONE 3)

This is just an experiment for me. I cant manage full hydroponic systems due to either expense or noise. But normal soil and watering I am getting to a point where the plants have dried out before my normal watering and have been damaged enough to have poor growth. A few real sunny days in a window while I was gone.

My idea is hydroponics work. Plants adapt to use water roots. Trees can survive near rivers and swamps. Roots are designed to spread out so at least one will gather one or more elements it needs. As long as the upper roots have dry airy soil the lower roots can become water roots and taken in what they need there.

All plants are different and this wont always work. For example I doubt a catus will like anything else they very dry well drained soil. period.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2012 at 6:07PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dickiefickle(5B Dousman,Wi.)

Hello Everyone,
I hope someone maybe able to assist me with a few questions concerning self-watering containers. I saw this clip from video jug concerning creation of a simple self watering pot.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-a-self-watering-container

Has anyone seen this before or this kind of concept for a self watering container?
What do you think ?

    Bookmark   April 27, 2012 at 2:55AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
To find popular threads try this...
When you are looking for popular threads from the GW...
Loveplants2 8b Virginia Beach, Virginia
Help! My slash pine seedlings in containers are turning yellowish
I have several hundred slash pine seedlings I put in...
George Spector
I have a cold, south facing porch. What container flowers might grow?
It's cold there now. In a few weeks nothing will free...
Blue Hills Gardens and Designs
Need help identifying a few plants from a photo
Can someone please identify the plants used in this...
Merci Ava Maria
Dealing with Water-Retentive Soils
Dealing with Water-Retentive Soilscolor>size> A...
tapla (mid-MI z5b-6a)
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™