What can be done with the container soil after green peas growing

lotaera(6)May 6, 2011

Two years ago I planted and grew green peas in the container on my balcony. After this single attempt to grow green peas on the balcony I gave up the idea of growing peas on the balcony as the harvest was very small. The soil in the container experienced two cold winters on the balcony and now I wonder what I can plant into this soil. Can I plant strawberries in this soil or any flowers or this soil should be discarded?

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tapla (mid-MI z5b-6a)

Loori - do you have a lot of containers to fill, or is it just this one we're considering what to do about?

Al

    Bookmark   May 6, 2011 at 3:44PM
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rockguy(7a)

" Can I plant strawberries in this soil or any flowers or this soil should be discarded?"
I would not discard any non infected soil. Re-till the surface and re-plant.

    Bookmark   May 6, 2011 at 3:47PM
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lotaera(6)

I am speaking about one container with the soil after green peas growing 2 years ago. I want to plant wild strawberries in the containers on my balcony. Actually I have two containers with soil- one big container is with the soil after green peas planting two years ago, another smaller container with fresh soil for flowers planting.
Can I plant wild straberries in both containers? Most of all I want to know what to do with the soil in the big container after green peas? Is it enough to loosen the soil and to plant wild strawberries?

    Bookmark   May 6, 2011 at 5:16PM
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calistoga_al

The unanswered question, is what did you start with? If you used a peat based bag of potting mix from the garden center, the mix by now, is no longer able to support enough air in the mix. I would start over with a new batch, hopefully based on Al's 5-1-1 recipe. Al

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 8:36AM
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Phildeez(9b)

I would at least add it to your in-ground garden. Feels like a waste to discard as much medium after growing in it once, even if it is too broken down to be in a container.

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 11:42AM
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lotaera(6)

So you advise to add once used soil to some in-ground garden which I don't have, all i have is the containers on my balcony. You also say that if the soil was used for growing only once then I shouldn't discard it. Actually what I want to learn is what is going to happen with wild strawberries plants if I plant them into the soil used 2 years ago for green peas growing. Shall I try or wild strawberries might have some difficulties in such a soil?

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 11:50AM
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tapla (mid-MI z5b-6a)

Loori - Al is angling toward the same thing I am - a probable total collapse of what you have now, which means that even if you 'loosen' the soil, it will compact again soon after you start watering, which is a decidedly bad thing for wild strawberries that most often grow in very sandy soils that drain extremely fast. Strawberries don't like wet feet, so I'm afraid you'd be disappointed in your results.

You could probably enjoy good success if you were to invest a few $ in some pine bark fines and a little perlite, and mix about 1 part of your old soil with 1 part of perlite & 5 or more parts of pine bark, along with a little lime. You'd end up with a free-draining mix that looks like what you see in the middle of this picture:

The bark at 3,6 and 9 give you an idea of what to look for if you're interested.

Good luck!

Al (the other Al) ;-)

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 12:02PM
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lotaera(6)

I have the container that is 75 cm long, 31 cm high, 29 cm deep filled with soil. You advise to mix some pine bark fines and a little perlite with my old soil. How much pine bark and perlite do I need for the soil in the container of the size given above?
I think that the roots of green pea plants are left in the soil, though 2 winters have passed since that time. Could these roots cause any problem to the wild strawberry plants?

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 3:07PM
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tapla (mid-MI z5b-6a)

It will take about 15 dry gallons to fill the pot (2 cu ft). If you follow the 5:1:1 ratio of pine bark:your old soil:perlite, you would need about 11 gallons of bark (there are about 15 gallons in a 2 cu ft bag), about 2 gallons of your old soil, and 2 gallons of perlite, plus about 3/4 cup of dolomitic (garden) lime.

AL

    Bookmark   May 7, 2011 at 10:03PM
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lotaera(6)

In the soil bought there are some white particles. I think it is perlite, in the soil used 2 years ago there were and there are the same white parciles, so it means that the soil is with perlite and if it is with perlite then I shouldn't add anything to it. Am I right? And what about the green peas roots which have been staying in the soil for 2 winters, have they rotten and become a part of the soil?

    Bookmark   May 8, 2011 at 2:46PM
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calistoga_al

From reading your posts I have the impression that you think your soil has remained static since you removed your sweet peas. Whether you are growing in it or not, it is still composting, or breaking down the organic ingredients, including the dead roots. Al

    Bookmark   May 9, 2011 at 8:55AM
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lotaera(6)

So I think I can start planting wild strawberry seedlings into this soil without any great reworking of the soil.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2011 at 2:22PM
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lotaera(6)

I visited local gardening store, explained the shop-assistant what I am going to do- to plant wild strawberry seedlings into the soil initially meant for flowers but which PH is suitable for wild straberries.The soil characteristics are as follows: the main part fairly loose peat, the rest part are cut up limestone, pebble, Ph 5,5-6,5, the added fertilizer 2,0 kg/m3 NPK feltilizer.
Then I asked her about the necessity to add regular fertilizer, as I read before that wild strawberries can grow without any fertilizer. The shop-assistant advised me to add into the soil Natural fertilizer on the basis of worms in the proportion 1:3. And as if this worm based fertilizer will be enough for on avarege 3 years of wild strawberries productive growth period.I want to know if she is right or may be it is not necessary at all to add any fertilizer to the soil?
Could you answer this question and give some recommendation on the fertilizing and illnesses prevention medium to get a good yield of wild straberries!?

    Bookmark   May 15, 2011 at 7:20AM
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