How many times can you transplant green onions?

joel_bc(z6 BC)March 18, 2011

I've got some trays of green onions (indoors under grow lights) that are sprouting like green hair! Very nice to have, this early in our season. At present, they're in the house but ultimate options will be to let them grow to harvestable size either in the greenhouse or out in the garden - or a bit of both.

The greenhouse is a new element in our gardening reality (put it up last spring). It's small, hence soil space is limited. When the little onion starts get to be maybe matchstick-thickness, I may want to put them into one of the greenhouse beds - there's still 20" of snow on the garden beds here. But after a few weeks, I may need the space for something else.

Can I then AGAIN transplant the green onions? Or would this be too hard on them?

Don't know that it would make any difference, but the onions are Ishikura variety (and described as non-bulbing 'spring onions').

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dan_staley(5b/SS 2b AHS 6-7)

The fewer the better. I direct sow so I don't have to transplant.

Dan

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 11:11AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bluebirdie(Z8 SF E Bay)

I think you can transplant green onions unlimited times as long as they're given moderate water. I start them in trays and usually transplant them at least once or twice and never had any problems.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 12:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joel_bc(z6 BC)

bluebirdie, thanks. You wrote: "I think you can transplant green onions unlimited times as long as they're given moderate water. I start them in trays and usually transplant them at least once or twice and never had any problems."

When I read this, I assumed "moderate water" meant given enough water, right? (Rather than limited water or "not too much water"...)

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 12:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dan_staley(5b/SS 2b AHS 6-7)

When you transplant, you slow down growth. Up there, long-day onions need good timing to grow to give good yields. The more you transplant, the more you slow growth. Short-day onions as in the Bay Area are not so dependent on timing. But gardening is often about an experiment and we learn by doing!

Dan

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 12:38PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bluebirdie(Z8 SF E Bay)

That's correct. Don't let your young green onion seedlings dry out, and like Dan said, don't transplant them more than you need to. They should survive.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 2:25PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bsntech(5b)

dan_staley -

You mention that you seed your onions directly in the ground. Are you using seeds or sets?

If using seeds - when do you typically plant them - and do you plant them right in the garden or a greenhouse?

I started all of mine back at the beginning of January - and just transplanted them outside yesterday. They still are very tiny so I hope they come out of it.

Just curious how you can plant the onions directly in the ground and get good bulbs out of them since they need started extra-early.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 3:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dan_staley(5b/SS 2b AHS 6-7)

bsn, I direct seed in the ground. I find I get more uniform bulbing. I start them underneath hoops or a coldframe and remove structure after frost danger passes.

Here's a pic from last year, I'm warming ground under the glazing and I have two separate structures to protect from frost in the image:

At the very far end of the bed are some black hoops, under which is some lettuce and spinach, likely planted in Feb or so. Pic taken on the Ides of March. I'm a little behind this year as I was out of town, but this weekend I'll start warming the soil then toward the end of next week I'll sow.

Dan

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 5:38PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jolj(7b/8a)

Thanks everyone, I learned a great deal about onions in this thread.
In S.C. we use short day sets, but I may put out some seeds this fall, with my garlic cloves.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2011 at 10:58PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Worth time and supplies to plant old seeds?
I have seeds ranging from one year to probably about...
malkar
over wintering cabbage family for second year seed
I'm interested in which cabbage family vegetables I...
matthias_lang
what varieties of watermelons are you growing?
what varieties of watermelons are you growing?
gridgardener
Sincere Question - Why Participate?
If I had found this site from doing a web search because...
soilent_green
Do eggplants have high yield?
I'm going to grow one. Thinking of growing two. Do...
shijitake
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™