Corrugated drain pipe

jockewing(9a)April 13, 2014

I am working on a project to drain my backyard which floods every time it rains. I have a ditch along my street in the front yard which is at a lower level than the backyard I want to drain to.

I have spent all day yesterday and today digging the trench from an existing drain in the front yard past the side yard, all the way to the draining spots I want in the backyard. Due to all the curves I had to follow due to trees, roots, and other obstructions, I feel I can't really use PVC pipe.

So I bought about 15 lengths of the corrugated 4 inch solid piping. The trouble is the stuff leaks like crazy at every joint! Adding duct tape helps but I don't want to do all this work and end up just distributing the leaks somewhere else in the yard. I want everything to flow to the ditch.

My yard is very flat so I don't have a huge amount of slope to work with, so my pipes have to get a bit of water in them before they will start flowing to the street. I don't understand what the point of these pipes are if they leak so easily. I have read that roofing cement will work, but that seems to take forever to dry. I have also read that once you pack the dirt back around the pipes that will compress the joints and there should be minimal leakage.

Can anyone offer advice on how to get a good seal on these things?

And please, I know PVC would probably be better, but as I explained before, it would be a huge PITA to use it in my situation---I am forced to dig a lot of wavy trenches.

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yardvaark

The good thing about solid pvc drain pipe is not that it doesn't leak, but that it doesn't let roots in. You made the call on corrugated, so accept what it is and don't worry about it. During the rain, water is going to be leaking into your yard at every square inch. So if a little is leaking from the new drain pipe, what difference will it make while you are in your house nice and dry? When the rain comes hard, the pipe will still carry all the surface water away and the vast majority of it to the outlet. Eventually, the pipe will get roots into it, but hopefully, by then, you will have sold it and moved away.

    Bookmark   April 13, 2014 at 8:46PM
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frankielynnsie(7B)

We are facing digging 2 new lines this summer due to corrugated drain pipe because the roots have gotten in and are blocking the water. It has taken 20 years to become a problem. We will be using PVC in the new trenches. We plan on living here until we can't so we will probably be doing new lines every year for the next few years.

    Bookmark   April 13, 2014 at 9:07PM
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elysianfields(9b CA)

I have corrugated in about five different spots to carry water away from our house which is in the hills. The water has to come down and around. Two are buried and the rest are above ground and hidden a bit in foliage and ground cover. Depending on your landscaping you could create a dry riverbed of stone and embed the corrugated in that to help reduce root infiltration. Just an alternate idea. I do not notice water pooling at joints at all, even with the above ground installations.

    Bookmark   April 17, 2014 at 3:12AM
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