Young tomato leaves discoloration

nycgarden(6)July 11, 2011

Hello fellow gardeners,

I was hoping someone has come across this issue before and can offer me some advice.

My tomato plants are getting some odd discoloration on the tips of young leaves at the top of the plant. (See picture below)

I use a commercial potting mix (perlite and peat mostly) that I amended with a tbs of garden lime and slow release fertilizer. I also use a 10-10-10 water soluble fertilizer once every 2 weeks (1/2 tbs per gallon).

The plants are quite large and my first thought is that they have become root bound.

Fruit production does not seem to have been affected.

They are in 10 gal Rubbermaid containers on top of a roof in NYC.

Here is a link that might be useful: My Gardenblog

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
redshirtcat(6a MO StL)

Looks to me like they are lacking magnesium but I'm no expert.

    Bookmark   July 11, 2011 at 9:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terrybull

Scientific Name
Alternaria solani

Identification

Circular to angular spots with dark, concentric rings (target spots) develop on the older foliage
Severe infections spread to younger leaves
Lesions become quite large and are often associated with considerable leaf yellowing
Fruit infections are not common, but may appear as a blackened area at the stem-end
Often Confused With
Bacterial Canker (Early blight may cause browning of leaf edges, similar in appearance, but a lighter brown than bacterial canker symptoms.)
Septoria Leaf Spot (Early blight lesions grow much larger than Septoria lesions.)

Period of Activity
Early blight overwinters in infected crop residue. Spores are present throughout the growing season and may be carried long distances in the wind. Temperatures of 17- 24�C (63- 75�F) and extended leaf wetness favour early blight development.

Scouting Notes
Early blight lesions can be distinguished from other lesions on the foliage by the presence of concentric rings.

Thresholds
Where available use the TOMcast program. If this is unavailable, begin a preventative spray program when the first fruits are about walnut size. Repeat sprays as necessary. Repeat at 5- 7 day intervals during continuous moist weather. Extend the schedule to 12- 14 days in warm, dry weather if diseases are under control. Applications should continue until close to harvest.

Advanced
Scientific Name
Alternaria solani

Identification
The first signs of disease often appear deep in the canopy where the leaves stay wet. Lesions first appear on leaves as dark brown to black spots, 8- 13 mm (5/16- 1/2 in.) in size, on older foliage, but can grow much larger. Spots are circular to angular with dark concentric rings (target spot). The tissue surrounding the spot may be yellow. Lesions become quite large and are often associated with considerable leaf yellowing.

If the disease is severe, lesions also appear on younger leaves. As lesions enlarge, their shape may become irregular. They are often bordered by leaf veins.

Early blight may cause browning of leaf edges. Lesions may coalesce to form large dead areas on the leaf. Lesions may also appear on stems and blossoms (a cause of blossom drop).

Fruit infection is uncommon, showing up as a blackened area, similar in appearance to blossom-end rot, but at the stem end of the fruit. Fruit symptoms are most common late in the season, especially when extended wet periods occur at harvest.

Often Confused With
Bacterial Canker (Early blight may cause browning of leaf edges, similar in appearance, but a lighter brown than bacterial canker symptoms.)
Septoria Leaf Spot (Early blight lesions grow much larger than Septoria lesions.)

Biology
The fungus that causes early blight survive on decayed plant material in soil and can be seed borne. It is spread by wind.

Period of Activity
Early blight overwinters in infected crop residue. Spores are present throughout the growing season and may be carried long distances in the wind. Temperatures of 17- 24�C (63- 75�F) and extended leaf wetness favour early blight development. Unless the fungus is present on transplants, lesions generally don�t show up until flowering.

Scouting Notes
Early blight lesions can be distinguished from other lesions on the foliage by the presence of concentric rings.

Thresholds
Where available use the TOMcast program. If this is unavailable, begin a preventative spray program when the first fruits are about walnut size. Repeat sprays as necessary. Repeat at 5- 7 day intervals during continuous moist weather. Extend the schedule to 12- 14 days in warm, dry weather if diseases are under control. Application should continue until close to harvest.

Management Notes

Reduce early blight inoculum by following a 3 to 4 year crop rotation.
Ensure transplants are healthy and free of disease.
Cultivars vary in tolerance to early blight.
Overhead irrigation can promote foliar fungal disease due to longer periods of leaf wetness.

    Bookmark   July 13, 2011 at 10:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
redshirtcat(6a MO StL)

So this is definitely early blight Terrybull?

nycgarden it would be great if you could let me know how those leaves progress.. I'm interested in knowing what happens if you don't snip those off

    Bookmark   July 13, 2011 at 6:55PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terrybull

not definite but i was showing what to look for and the defimition of earley blight.

earley blight lesions can be distinguished from other lesions on the foliage by the presence of concentric rings.

    Bookmark   July 13, 2011 at 8:33PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terrybull

heres what it looks like.

    Bookmark   July 13, 2011 at 8:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dickiefickle(5B Dousman,Wi.)

Strip off infected leaves,put in garbage bags ,dispose of.
You may still get some toms.
When done growing dispose of all planting mix .also mulch if used.
Dilute 1 part Bleach with 10 parts water ,clean your containers ,tools, wooden stakes,etc.
They say it overwinters in soil and plant debris.
I had this last year and because I didnt clean my containers last year I have it again.
So you can learn from my mistakes.

    Bookmark   July 14, 2011 at 3:54AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nycgarden(6)

Hi,
Thanks for the replies. It may be early blight. A friend who grew some transplants for me has a really bad case of EB on her toms. The only reason I have some doubts is that I don't really see rings on the leaves. Also, it seems to be concentrated on the top of the plant. I would expect to see EB on all of the leaves, no?

What I hope is that my plants have gotten so big, in terms of the pots that they are in, that the roots of the new shoots at the top of the plant are getting suffocated.

I'll take a closer look today to see if I can see concentric circles and report back. Thanks for all of the advice. I will certainly be cleaning my pots and tools with the bleach solution just in case.

    Bookmark   July 14, 2011 at 8:44AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nycgarden(6)

Hello fellow gardeners,
I took a closer look and didn't see concentric circles in the brown spots on the leaves, so I don't think it is early blight. I will be using the diluted bleach cleaning at the end of the season just to make sure though.

Thanks for your replies.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2011 at 12:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ohiofem(6a Ohio)

It doesn't look like early blight to me. Tomatoes are so susceptible to so many diseases that they'll break your heart. But, in most cases I've encountered the various fungal diseases start near the bottom, in older leaves. It looks more like a fertilizer issue to me. Given your regular feeding, I would be a little more worried about over fertilizing or imbalance than underfertilizing. I would take a wait and watch approach since you have good growth and production. Maybe slow down on the fertilizer and be careful not to over water in a peat based mix.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2011 at 5:27PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
terrybull

its not fertilizer, there would be whiteish brown edges not the blotches.
it is not over watering, they would be just yellow.

is it getiing worse or staying neutral?
if worse this would be my second thought.

Yellow, uneven splotches on the leaves. Dead leaves that remain on the plant. Dead areas can be surrounded by a yellow circle.
No damage to stems evident.

Powdery Mildew, a fungus that infects weeds and crops in the solanaceous family.
Occurs late in the season.

    Bookmark   July 16, 2011 at 8:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nycgarden(6)

Thanks Terrybull, Ohiofem, et al,
I don't think it's Powdery Mildew. I had that on my Zukes in the past and know what that looks like. The discoloration seems to be staying neutral for now. Interesting that it's only affecting the top leaves of the plant and not the older bottom leaves.

Any thoughts on the idea that it may be due to root bound plant that has outgrown its container?

I'll limit the fert. for now to see if that has any effect.

Thanks,

    Bookmark   July 18, 2011 at 8:47AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Need help!..white spots on my lemon seedlings!!
I recently found white spots on the leaves of my lemon...
Kavitha Raghunath
Help with 1:1:1 - weight and sourcing in the UK
I've just clicked that weight is going to be an issue...
containergardenerbeginner
Question about too much dryness in my container garden
I have several Behlen food-grade stocktanks (1x2x6)...
catherinet
Trying Petunias indoors
I thought that I would try to grow some Petunias indoors,...
nopets
meyer lemon tree leaves yellowing
I have a meyer lemon tree and I brought it in for the...
mlmib
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™