How Do I Tie the 2 Sections Together?

loreleieAugust 2, 2012

Some of you might remember My previous post about this project~ a sloped front yard lawn removal~ it's the first big job I've done and it's taken a little over a month because I work part time and do gardening side jobs because it's what I love to do. (I studied horticulture & took 2 semesters of landscape construction but nothing design).

Anyway, the photo is the main part & the driveway is on the right. On the other side of driveway is a long narrow strip 18" x 15'and I'm in need of suggestions for how to visually connect the long strip with the main part. I'm planning to fill in the main section a lot more but as for the narrow strip, I don't want anything that will grow too big since the client does park in driveway. It's too small for the cinder moss rock I used but I do have some left~ not sure how/ where to place it. And YES Im removing the cement blocks & will either use wood or benderboard with the idea that the plants will hide it. Is that a dumb idea? I posted a link to a photo of the strip below.

Also just want to mention that I place 3 ceramic pots of varying heights in front of the meter but because it sticks out so far I had to place a shorter pot directly in front so now i need to figure out the right plant to use. I'll take a photo today & post later.

Here is a link that might be useful:

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catkim(San Diego 10/24)

Use some Dymondia on both sides.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2012 at 10:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bahia(SF Bay Area)

Dymondia as ground cover could definitely help visually tie the two sides together, but I think you also need some vertical accents that will fit in the narrow 18" wide strip and could be repeated in the main area. I don't know where you are located, but will assume you don't get much frost and want to stick with a drought tolerant/succulents theme. Plants such as Aloe vera, Aloe striata, Asparagus densiflorus 'Meyers', Euphorbia lambii, E. tirucalii 'Sticks on Fire', Thamnochortus species, Dianella 'Baby Bliss', Strelitzia juncea could all work well here. You could also use mid-height succulents such as Senecio mandraliscae, Bulbine frutescens, Cotyledon orbiculata, Puya mirabilis, Dyckia 'Cherry Coke'. I'd consider adding one vertical palm element on that driveway side, either a Chamaerops humilis argentea thinned to a single trunk, or repeat the Cordyline you have at the entry. Euphorbia lambii can function as a small tree-like element as well.

    Bookmark   August 3, 2012 at 12:06PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bahia(SF Bay Area)

Dymondia as ground cover could definitely help visually tie the two sides together, but I think you also need some vertical accents that will fit in the narrow 18" wide strip and could be repeated in the main area. I don't know where you are located, but will assume you don't get much frost and want to stick with a drought tolerant/succulents theme. Plants such as Aloe vera, Aloe striata, Asparagus densiflorus 'Meyers', Euphorbia lambii, E. tirucalii 'Sticks on Fire', Thamnochortus species, Dianella 'Baby Bliss', Strelitzia juncea could all work well here. You could also use mid-height succulents such as Senecio mandraliscae, Bulbine frutescens, Cotyledon orbiculata, Puya mirabilis, Dyckia 'Cherry Coke'. I'd consider adding one vertical palm element on that driveway side, either a Chamaerops humilis argentea thinned to a single trunk, or repeat the Cordyline you have at the entry. Euphorbia lambii can function as a small tree-like element as well.

    Bookmark   August 3, 2012 at 10:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loreleie

Thank you for all the suggestions! Dymondia is nice but a bit too blah. The client want the look of thick succulents. I found some Fire sticks too~ I love those! I'm still open to more suggestions especially if they are features

    Bookmark   August 8, 2012 at 5:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deviant-deziner(Oh zone)

How about tying it together with the senecio maderensis as the lower ground cover and pop in some Aeonium purpureas , cotyledons and some kangaroo paws ?

This project photo below is a revamped planting that was done in May using mostly succulents.
the bright yellow yucca on each side of the walkway is a soft leaf Yucca
bright star - I'm loving its soft leaf but strongly formed vertical shape and the color is wow ( in my oh so humble opinion )

    Bookmark   August 8, 2012 at 6:07PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bahia(SF Bay Area)

You may be too quick to dismiss the Dymondia; it is an excellent foil to succulents and really allows them to "pop" within a new garden, similar to how lawn provides necessary negative space for typical gardens. Plus it is water compatible with succulents and suppresses weeds while also taking foot traffic. All succulents as ground covers don't make access as easy for maintenance, something that needs proper consideration with succulent garden designs...

    Bookmark   August 9, 2012 at 2:10AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catkim(San Diego 10/24)

I was suggesting the Dymondia to tie things together, not as a feature. Think of flooring in a house, flowing from room to room. The furniture is the feature, but the continuity of the flooring helps tie it together.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2012 at 1:26PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Small Tree Suggestions
I have a 20 x 20 concrete patio that I'd like to put...
kristinainaustin
Need help building a retaining wall
Hi all this is my first post so I hope I can get some...
jeffboyardeee
Bed lines don't matter if....
They're covered in snow! It will be interesting to...
Bama_Joe
Privacy for Small Yard - Help!
Hi All! First time poster - LONG TIME reader! I'm in...
rsislow
Landscape advice for front yard please!
We have just moved into a house in SoCal - zone 10...
glitzalicious
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™