Help! Large steep slope, can I plant ground covering from seeds?

lizatgarOctober 17, 2012

There is a large steep bank at the back of my new house (sloped to the house), it takes more than half of the backyard and is about 100X15. We are a busy family with two small children and do not have a lot of time for gardening... I want to do a ground cover but it seems too big to cover! It is a new construction, so I'm wondering if we can just spread seeds of some sort of ground covering just like how you start a lawn? That will be so much easier than planting them one by one! Any suggestions? I'm pulling my hair when I think about it... I've had quite some sleepless nights. Help please!

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yardvaark

I suggest you show a good picture of the area.

    Bookmark   October 17, 2012 at 10:30PM
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bahia(SF Bay Area)

Many different species of plants can be planted via hydroseedixing a slope, but such mixes aren't typically using the same sorts of plants most often used as ground covers planted as rooted cuttings from flats/4" pots/one gallan cans. Hydroseeding still requires certain procedures and follow up care and watering/maintenance to be successful. If you were to plant fast growing wide spreading more shrubby plants to cover your slope, it may be competitive price-wise and give you more options of plant types. You may find it worthwhile to hire a landscape architect/landscape designer/landscape contractor to meet with you on-site, review your conditions/expectations/budget and advise you what makes the most sense for your yard. There are always trade-offs for any approach, and hydroseeding may/may not be a good option for you.

    Bookmark   October 17, 2012 at 11:28PM
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bahia(SF Bay Area)

Many different species of plants can be planted via hydroseedixing a slope, but such mixes aren't typically using the same sorts of plants most often used as ground covers planted as rooted cuttings from flats/4" pots/one gallan cans. Hydroseeding still requires certain procedures and follow up care and watering/maintenance to be successful. If you were to plant fast growing wide spreading more shrubby plants to cover your slope, it may be competitive price-wise and give you more options of plant types. You may find it worthwhile to hire a landscape architect/landscape designer/landscape contractor to meet with you on-site, review your conditions/expectations/budget and advise you what makes the most sense for your yard. There are always trade-offs for any approach, and hydroseeding may/may not be a good option for you.

    Bookmark   October 17, 2012 at 11:34PM
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lizatgar

To Yardvaark and bahia: thank you for your suggestions! I'll take a picture in the weekend.

    Bookmark   October 18, 2012 at 9:27AM
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