list of plants

teengardener1888(NY Albany 5a)May 27, 2012

Now that you have told me your favorite plant, can you tell me as many houseplant names as you can muster

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pirate_girl(Zone7 NYC)

Why?

    Bookmark   May 27, 2012 at 10:33PM
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teengardener1888(NY Albany 5a)

Because im trying to find good houseplants

    Bookmark   May 27, 2012 at 11:48PM
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plantmasterm(z7)

teen, what zone are you in, it doesn't matter what others are growing, get what appeals to you and ask all that you need to if you have problems with it..its all a matter of your own personal taste.

    Bookmark   May 27, 2012 at 11:56PM
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stonesriver(6B Tennessee)

Plantmaterm is right. Find house plants you like, learn their care and whether you can meet those requirements. You won't find "good" house plants by depending on others' opinions.

You've already asked for favorites and got great response. However, requesting people to list all the house plant names they know is another kettle of fish since most of us probably know 200+. :-)

Find web sites that sell house plants and you can see photos, care instructions, etc., all at the same place.

JMO

Linda

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 12:13AM
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pirate_girl(Zone7 NYC)

Also TeenG,

Ask around your own neighborhood to see what grows well in the area.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 7:48AM
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marguerite_gw

Hi teengardener,

I can answer this question - I will tell you about my plants, far fewer than most people here have. There was a time I had well over a hundred, my appetite whetted by this forum, but I quickly found I couldn't look after them properly, for various reasons, including the fact that I live in a very small house with a large family and a feisty dog.

I haven't got photos of my plants at the moment, but I will get around to taking some. Meanwhile, my plants are:
an olive tree, Ledebouria socialis and a parlour palm all living in the bathroom; Oxalis regnelli, (purple-leaved), Crassula arborescens 'Bluebird', Crassula 'Hummel's Sunset', another parlour palm (baby), a Calamondin orange and a large aspidistra (plain green) in the living room, Ludisia discolor, Ctenanthe (name evades me at the moment), Marantas - two different, Hoya bella and Hoya bella variegata, two miniature Phaelenopsis hybrids (yellow and a yellow striped one), Ceropegia woodii, two green Ficus benjaminas, one variegated one, a Busy Lizzie and boxes of various jade cuttings in the kitchen, other Ficus benjaminas elsewhere in the house. As you can see, I have very few, but I recommend them all for growing in the house. Having a holiday outside are a couple of echeverias, and a real favourite, Punica granata nana. All of my plants are really easy to look after. Ask me more about them any time you like.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 10:45AM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

This would be easier to answer if you could define what a "good" plant is to you. Do you want plants... that live for a really long time? That have pretty leaves? That grow really fast? That make flowers? That require little attention? What pleases you? Do you put plants outside for the summer? What kind of conditions do you have to offer inside during the winter?

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 11:08AM
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marguerite_gw

teengardener1888 is probably a bit like me and enjoys hearing about other people's favourites; it can lead to one trying them out for oneself (or not). That's why I enjoy these great forums so much. I'm fascinated by the amount of plants some people can cope with.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 1:27PM
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dellis326 (Danny)

Here's a potential problem with this. Many of us have dozens of plants and writing out a list isn't just a minute or two thing, if you're "fishing" for ideas on which plants to get maybe the best place to start is to describe the conditions that are available to you to grow your plants in.

Some folks keep a bit of everything, some keep mostly one family or type of growth form. Examples of this would be carnivorous plants, Aroids, orchids or cacti. Keeping plants indoors isn't as dependent on your USDA zone as keeping them outside but it can effect what or how you grow many plants. There are a lot of good houseplants but even then, there are some that just don't seem to like to grow from some people when there's a zillion others who grow them fine. It's a good idea to look around and see what others around you are growing and try those

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 11:39PM
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teengardener1888(NY Albany 5a)

I apm looking for small colorful plants for shade

    Bookmark   May 29, 2012 at 12:50AM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

That specific request is easier to address. The annuals at your local garden center are an inexpensive place to start, with those that are really tender perennials, like wax begonias, polka dot plant (Hypoestes), Coleus, spikes (usually Dracaena marginata), Alternantheras, sweet potato vine.

More traditional house plants you might like... Tradescantia zebrina, Tradescantia spathacea (I've been warned some people can get a poison-ivy like rash from this,) Sansevieria, Syngonium, Dieffenbachia, Hedera helix (english ivy.)

    Bookmark   May 29, 2012 at 10:09AM
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marguerite_gw

Would they be all suitable for shade?

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 9:19AM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

IME, yes.

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 9:58AM
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pirate_girl(Zone7 NYC)

Personally, I'd avoid all Ivy (at least for indoors) they can be serious magnets for mealy bugs!

Grew one once from a reputable nursery in CT, I returned it to them, COVERED in mealy bugs. I never grew another nor did business w/ that nursery again.

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 10:49AM
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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

When looking for houseplants, it's important to take sort of an inventory of conditions in the home. What directions do the windows face, if plants will be located to take advantage of the natural light? What are the typical temperatures in your home at night and at night? What about humidity levels? Do you have forced air vents for heating or cooling? Locate your plants away from them.
You keep mentioning "shade ". That is a term usually used to describe outdoor conditions....partial shade, full shade, afternoon shade, etc. Plants that are intended to be grown inside for the winter even for a little while need to be selected for the actual indoor conditions.

So! Are you wanting to find some colorful plants for a low -light home? Or shade loving plants that can do well in a bright home in the winter?

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 2:14PM
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cliss(6)

Teen, if you're really looking for lists... There's a blog called Plants Are the Strangest People which is focused on houseplants and has included several lists of various kinds. He's also profiled a few dozen plants, providing general care information and difficulty ratings. See especially the list of "Plants I've Tried" at the top of the page.

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 8:13PM
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mrmothernature

The term "shade" is traditionally applied to outdoor light conditions and is usually further divided as light shade and deep shade. Confusion occurs when "shade" is applied to indoor plants. Indoor light is much less intense than outdoor light. A plant that does well in light shade outdoors would probably require a very sunny window location indoors. Even a deep shade plant would need lots of bright indirect light when indoors.

Indoor light for plants is usually categorized as high light, medium light and low light. In my experience, most people tend to over-estimate the available light in their homes. Even low light plants will gradually decline if they are more than 6 to 10 feet from an uncovered window, depending on the window exposure. Minimum light for a low light plant would be natural light adequate for reading newsprint comfortably all day long in that location.

Why this obsession with light? Because if you don't get a good match between the light you can provide and the light requirements of a particular plant species, then nothing else you do will matter much.

~Will

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 7:59AM
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marguerite_gw

I don't think raising houseplants is as much a science as you might think. All twenty-three or so of my plants live very happily with me, and the light from my windows is more than enough for them to thrive and be happy. Plants that live and flourish in homes are tolerant by nature. Of course, I tend to go for so-called 'easy' plants anyway. Even so-called 'difficult' houseplants will be quite happy in an enclosed environment such as a large bottle garden or wardian case can provide, even in moderate indoor light, and of course you can provide lighting systems to boost their needs in this direction, but I prefer the simple life myself. Try not to worry too much about your plants or you just won't enjoy them. And I do think that you need to try out loads before you decide what you really like. I wish you the best, teengardener, with all your houseplant endeavours.

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 9:33AM
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pirate_girl(Zone7 NYC)

I think Rhizo hit the nail on the head. This seems to be key info. which is often missing when one starts growing houseplants. To learn one's conditions & then try to match compatible plants w/ those conditions.

I'll use my home as example. I live in Brooklyn (suburb of NYC) w/ western exposures, the top of 6 stories & no A/C. It gets very hot & humid here in Summer & there's steam heat in Winter. Over time I've learned what does well here for me are lots of succulents & Hoyas & some houseplants. They can all take the strong heat, the summer humidity & most need to dry somewhat btwn waterings, so missing a watering here & there is rarely a problem.

After trying different Orchids over the yrs., I've learned to give up on them here. They need cooler nights than I can offer & often want temperature differences of at least 15 degrees or more btwn day & night. I can't provide those conditions, so after losing a number of Orchids here over the yrs. I no longer try them.

Will, thanks for explaining lighting as you did. Wish I'd read that a long time ago, nicely clear & informative.

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 10:39AM
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stonesriver(6B Tennessee)

Thanks, Will. Don't think I've ever heard light requirements explained so well in such a clear, concise manner.

I love ivies and palms. But I don't grow either because I'm not diligent enough to keep spider mites at bay. I tossed many before I acknowledged that fact. It's not just conditions that can determine what one grows.

Linda

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 2:44PM
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mrmothernature

Hi Linda,

You are right about most Palms species and Hedera ivies being spider mite magnets. But mites are a manageable problem, even on these species.

Make sure your plants are clean when you acquire them. Look real carefully on the undersides of the foliage for any signs of mites. If you keep the plant stress-free and you are diligent in checking mite-prone plants regularly for early signs of mites and treat them promptly and thoroughly with a soap spray, your plants should do quite well.

I care for dozens of mite magnet species every week and rarely have a problem.

~Will

    Bookmark   June 2, 2012 at 9:20PM
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