Gardening thru the winter?????

GardenMama22October 13, 2012

Hi, everyone im new here. I'm live in the east and yes the weather is taking a dip down. Im wanting to grow vegetable through the winter but dont think they would last. I did have an Idea about growing them in containers during the winter. Has anyone done that and if you have what success have you had with it and what vegetables. Any info and advice is much appreciated and Thank you.

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japus

Hi Mama]
Your in Jersey, I'm in western PA
I am in the same boat as you are, I have 5 raised beds that have been doing well for me over the years, I recently decided to take part of 1 and make a hot/cold frame.
I have a posting here, along with pictures that I will be adding to as I go along. It just may help you a bit.
Gotta go and plant my garlic today

    Bookmark   October 13, 2012 at 8:42AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

I did have an Idea about growing them in containers during the winter.

Growing them in containers outdoors or inside? Two very different sets of issues/problems. Setting up a cold frame in your garden is the ideal way to go.

The discussion currently just below your post has many great suggestions in it for containers and this previous discussion has some good ideas too.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: best tasting winter gardening in containers

    Bookmark   October 13, 2012 at 11:16AM
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jonfrum(6)

You can certainly grow salad greens in a headed greenhouse. Without heating, no go.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2012 at 2:12PM
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jonfrum(6)

That's 'heated' greenhouse.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2012 at 2:13PM
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ikea_gw

I am in zone 7a and last winter I had arugula and mustard greens growing through the winter here. Granted, we had a warm winter but I bet if you use some landscaping fabrics you can at least grow greens through December or even January.

    Bookmark   October 14, 2012 at 6:31PM
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laceyvail(6A, WV)

You do not need a heated greenhouse to grow salad greens. Management and timing of planting are the key. Look at Eliot Coleman's books; he grows stuff in Maine through the winter in an unheated hoop house.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2012 at 6:26AM
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pnbrown

I have a greenhouse dug into a south slope that heats itself and will produce some small growth even around the winter solstice. I am in 7a, in a colder zone the set-up would have to be more elaborate, and in a warmer one the winter growth would be more.

    Bookmark   October 15, 2012 at 8:01AM
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japus

Here's what I have going on now, not sure if I'll have it finished by winter

    Bookmark   October 15, 2012 at 9:26PM
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pnbrown

What will you glaze it with?

    Bookmark   October 15, 2012 at 9:55PM
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TreeDoor

I have good results growing peas in the winter provided there is enough light and of course you can plant flower bulbs for wintering so they bloom in the spring. In that same vein planting garlic is great in the winter because you also get an early spring harvest faster than even quick to produce vegetables. http://www.plantdex.com/index.php/plant-pulp-monthly/284-what-vegetables-to-plant-in-late-fall-and-winter

    Bookmark   October 16, 2012 at 12:54AM
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defrost49

This is my current subject. DH constructed a wood-framed plastic covered high tunnel this summer. I had hoped to have green beans until Thanksgiving but Friday night's frost here in NH was too cold for the protection I have them. I have Eliot Coleman's books and I'm intrigued by the idea of vegetable gardening as much of the winter as possible.
Last year, we had a warm winter and very little snow cover but spinach started growing again in the very early spring.
Parsnips stay in the ground all winter. We don't harvest until spring when the ground thaws.
Kale should last quite a while without protection.
I have young lettuce plants in the garden as well as in the tunnel. Those in the tunnel are growing faster due to the extra warmth. I also have beets, broccoli and Chinese green planted in the tunnel. The zucchini collapsed with the cold but up until then, we had new, fresh zucchini. Sugar Snap peas are growing, slowly, doing better since it got colder and were slightly touched by the frost. We've only had a handful harvested so far. Both zucchini and sugar snap peas are not on the Coleman list for winter hardiness but I'm experimenting to see how long I could keep them going.

I also expect to start some things sooner next spring. We also have a small, fabric covered (Agribon) low tunnel that I was using to protect a bean patch. Looks like I should have moved it into the high tunnel for extra protection.

I have carrots and beets in the garden still. I have read about mulching them so the ground doesn't freeze so they can be harvested thru the winter. We will probably eat all our small crop before the ground freezes.

Good luck to everyone working on extending their growing season. There's a lot for me to learn and some of it is going to be thru trial and error.

    Bookmark   October 16, 2012 at 7:29AM
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