Will the Brassicas Take some freezes?

MickEmeryOctober 21, 2013

It hit 32 last night. Supposed to freeze a couple more times this week. I still have cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower & brussels sprouts in my beds. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Mick

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susanzone5(z5NY)

They can handle some frost. Brussels sprouts taste better after frost.

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 8:19PM
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susanzone5(z5NY)

They can handle some frost. Brussels sprouts taste better after frost.

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 8:21PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Brasica can take temperatures down 20F, according to my own experience.

Here is a quote:

CAN withstand HARD FROST >>> Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collards, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, onions, parsley, peas, radishes, spinach, turnips, leeks, and sorrel.

HARD FROST: Temperatures below 28F

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 10:19PM
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laceyvail(6A, WV)

My savoy cabbages have survived totally unharmed after 10 degrees.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2013 at 6:45AM
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planatus(6)

Except for b sprouts, kale and collards, I find that the brassicas lose quality after hard freezing (below 26 for 6 hours), which is expected later this week. I will harvest my remaining cabbage and turnips before then.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2013 at 7:54AM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

I find that the brassicas lose quality after hard freezing (below 26 for 6 hours),
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planatus

I have experienced that overwintering vegetables becomes drier dring the winter with much less juice/moisture. Because the plant does not want to freeze and therefore minimizes water uptake. This might be a plus for(for example) cabbage but not radish.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2013 at 8:04AM
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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

I'm very surprised to see parsley and peas in a list which can take hard frost. Parsley goes dormant in the winter for me unless under a cloche. Peas can only survive as very small (i.e. a couple of inches tall) seedlings, and even then they're touch and go. And that's in my climate where freezes are seldom deep or long.

    Bookmark   October 22, 2013 at 10:37AM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Flora ... They said that parsley "CAN withstand HARD FROST", meaning that the very first frost is not going to kill it. I have seen my existing parsley survive hard freeze. In other words they were not killed. But if you harvest them, you are going to see any new growth. The same goes for peas in the spring. They will survive. I don't think parsley goes dormant but It stays live.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2013 at 6:33AM
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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

When I say it goes dormant that doesn't preclude it's being alive. My parsley, if not protected, reduces down to a few tiny unusable stems close to the ground. Our climate is very wet in winter and sometimes it just rots right out. It doesn't survive in good condition the way the brassicas do. We can harvest those in mid winter whereas the parsley has all but disappeared.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2013 at 1:17PM
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