Strange lawn

fo0hzyApril 1, 2012

My ex sent me these pictures... brand new house (as of 2010), she's the first owner & has paid dearly for lawn service. The looked fantastic until this year. Her neighbor's lawns still look great.

I've got a green hat but no green thumb... she said she was watering the lawn regularly last year, not so much this year.

What's it look like? Over/under watering? I know her 2011 water bills were HUGE (I helped cover them), but the difference in color of the grass doesn't make sense to me.

http://postimage.org/image/awdpml6hf

http://postimage.org/image/x9lg9e7f7

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fo0hzy

Bad sod, maybe?

    Bookmark   April 1, 2012 at 2:44PM
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dchall_san_antonio(8 San Antonio)

Here is your second picture

The grass type is Kentucky bluegrass. Had it been fescue most of it would be thin or thinning. The fact that it is so dense means it has to be KBG. With that in mind, the fact that it is not gray in color gives me confidence that it will be green soon enough.

She should be watering deeply and infrequently. Most people's inclination is to water shallow and frequently. Not sure why this is, but that's not right. I'm not convinced she's doing it wrong because I don't see any weeds. Can you comment on what her watering schedule is - frequency and duration?

She should be mowing at the first notch down from the top on the mower. Again, it looks good from down here in San Antonio!

I assume the lawn service did the fertilizer. Is she willing to pick up that load? It's not a huge area, at least not in the pix.

The evidence in the Internet forums is building that a modern organic program is the best thing you can do for your soil. You can read about the modern program in the GardenWeb Organic Gardening forum. Look for FAQs and find the Organic Lawn Care FAQ at the bottom of that list. In the old days organic lawn care meant using expensive compost. Quality varied from stanky to very good smelling with the majority of it being grossly stanky. Furthermore improper use often led to a dead lawn in just a few weeks. The modern approach uses relatively inexpensive grains you can find at most feed stores. They really work.

Here is a picture of a zoysia lawn that was fertilized with rabbit food (alfalfa pellets) 4 weeks prior to the photo. Note the improvement in density, color, and growth.

If you are interested there are a few minor adjustments to what is in the Organic Lawn Care FAQ regarding the amount to use.

    Bookmark   April 2, 2012 at 10:14PM
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