Should I seed now?

pmf17July 26, 2014

Just cleared a large area of 1400sf. Added some field loam from a farm near by.

I bought som Jonathan Green Black Beauty Ultra. I have lime a starter fertilize.

80% of the lawn sees sun from 10am to 2pm...

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morpheuspa

It's a little too early at this point. Optimum seeding time is when the evenings cool off and aren't going to get hot again--which is probably mid-August for you. That gives more than enough in the way of warm days to germinate the seed, but by the time it's growing it's cooled off.

Grasses, particularly young ones, don't like hot weather at all.

Also, hold off on the lime unless you have a recent soil test saying you need it. Even so, liming at seeding time isn't a good idea. It's very slow to work in (even fast lime is slow), and creates a zone of high pH around the tiny, baby plant roots.

They really prefer a lower pH than you'd be giving them.

    Bookmark   July 26, 2014 at 4:11PM
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pmf17

Thanks. Should I put down any weed killer in the time being to prevent weeds...

    Bookmark   July 26, 2014 at 8:54PM
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gardengal48

"Also, hold off on the lime unless you have a recent soil test saying you need it. Even so, liming at seeding time isn't a good idea. It's very slow to work in (even fast lime is slow), and creates a zone of high pH around the tiny, baby plant roots.

They really prefer a lower pH than you'd be giving them."

OMG!! You are the first person I think I have ever encountered (other than myself) who has not spoken strongly to liming when planting a new lawn (at least in cool season lawn areas). That seems to be almost a given when anyone is giving suggestions for either seeding a new lawn or rejuvenating an existing lawn. Also usually presented as a given for dealing with moss --- got lawn moss?? Lime!! One has very little to do with the other :-))

Thank you for being knowledgeable enough to go against conventional practices and suggest liming only when soil tests indicate the need

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 6:16PM
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pmf17

I have moss on various spots of the existing lawn. Note that the loam I have is not native to my property...

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 6:34PM
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morpheuspa

>>OMG!! You are the first person I think I have ever encountered (other than myself) who has not spoken strongly to liming when planting a new lawn (at least in cool season lawn areas). That seems to be almost a given when anyone is giving suggestions for either seeding a new lawn or rejuvenating an existing lawn. Also usually presented as a given for dealing with moss --- got lawn moss?? Lime!! One has very little to do with the other :-))

>>Thank you for being knowledgeable enough to go against conventional practices and suggest liming only when soil tests indicate the need

Tell me about it. Every lawn problem seems to be solved by "add lime." Even my grandfather--raised on a farm--added lime twice yearly because "the fertilizer works better."

Uh, I adore you Pop-pop, but no. No, it doesn't. It does if the pH was too low and you're moving it up into a more optimal range, but twice a year?

I tap my pH once yearly, more often than not, but by very measured and carefully calculated amounts based off the calcium saturation percentage and calcium numbers off my soil test.

Lime is wonderful...if you need it. Lime sets off problems caused by alkaline soils if you don't.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 7:24PM
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morpheuspa

>>Thanks. Should I put down any weed killer in the time being to prevent weeds...

Certainly. Spot spray weeds as required to control them right up to seeding time. Don't spray new grass until it's been mowed three times--because it needed to be mowed, not just because the rest of the lawn needs mowed. :-)

Usually that means the first weed control is in October or early November on new lawn. Sometimes it's not until spring.

>>I have moss on various spots of the existing lawn. Note that the loam I have is not native to my property...

Moss indicates open space plus ample water. Sometimes it means you're watering too often, sometimes it just means that portion of your soil is a low point and stays damp.

Really, it's not an indicator of pH, and only an indirect indicator of resource availability. If the resources were perfect, it's unlikely there'd be a hole for the moss to grow.

It's also not invasive, extremely delicate, and will disappear on its own once grass shades it out or the area goes dry.

    Bookmark   July 27, 2014 at 7:30PM
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gardengal48

Moss can also denote excessive shade, low soil fertility and compaction. IOW, all the issues that discourage turf grasses encourage moss development :-)) Correct these issues and you will have a healthy lawn and a healthy lawn successfully out-competes moss.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2014 at 6:00PM
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