What is this and how do I get rid of it?

dland2000March 19, 2014

I have a tough weed or grass of some sort growing in the cracks between my curb and the street. I suspect it's Bermuda grass, which is popular in my neighborhood (though I have St. Augustine).

It's extremely resilient and can survive cold, heat, and being trimmed/pulled out. I've done my best to pull it up but it's really hard to get the roots out. I've cut it back several times and it always returns.

I've tried a spray weed killer I got at Home Depot but it had no effect. Is there a stronger herbicide I can use?

Btw, I'm in Austin.

Thanks,
Dave

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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

Fusilade or Fusilade II are listed for control of Bermuda grass.
It is a multi-year project in all likelihood.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 12:21AM
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alisonoz_gw

You might not like to be using a herbicide that will be flushed by rain into a stormwater system?
I've had reasonably good success with driveway weeds here using a home-made mix spot-sprayed on a sunny day. Apply liberally and repeat a week later if need be. You usually see results of wilting in a day or less.
2 litres of cheap white vinegar mixed with 1/2 cup of cheap table salt - shake container a few times will dissolve a lot. Add tablespoon of dishwashing liquid at the end, and then gently shake. I also add a couple of drops of any food colouring concentrate from the pantry - helps temporarily to show where you've been.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 1:40AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

No thanks. We don't want salt added to our aquifers here in Austin.
Vinegar won't have any appreciable effect on Bermuda.

Here is a link that might be useful: increased threat of high salinity in Texas groundwater

This post was edited by saltcedar on Wed, Mar 19, 14 at 8:45

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 8:35AM
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Olychick

You could pretend you planted it in the cracks to soften the edges where they meet. It looks pretty as is, not sure it's worth poison to eliminate something so determined to find a spot to grow, that, if it were deliberate, would look quite nice.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:22AM
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lazy_gardens

It's Bermuda.

Glyphosate (plain glyphosate, diluted according to label) applied to it, wait a few days, then pull out top growth. Repeat as needed.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 10:36AM
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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

RoundUp on a warm, sunny day should do the trick. No need to soak the soil....just mist the grass and wait for a few days. After the foliage dies back, take the weedeater to it. Spray again if you see any new growth.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 11:05AM
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Suzi AKA DesertDance

You can always try pouring boiling water on it. That will cook the roots. These things just aren't fun, but we all face them.

We were tearing out our hair over some liquidamber suckers! Finally, the manager at HD told us NEVER to buy Round up premixed. Buy the concentrate... much cheaper, and mix it stronger than suggested. That did the trick!

Good luck to you!

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 11:08AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

The 3 above will just make it mad! ;-)

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 11:33AM
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dland2000

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions. I definitely don't want to flush anything harmful into the drainage system. There is a storm drain about 30 feet away from where I took that picture. There is no shortage of scary information related to the health effects of Roundup (glyphosate) to be read about. Who knows how much of it is true. I haven't looked into fusilade so maybe that's a good option.

Unfortunately pulling that stuff up is really really hard and usually ends up eroding some of the surrounding asphalt, which leads to a larger surface area for the grass to grow. The streets were just repaved and I was hoping that will kill it, but it found a way to survive. Maybe I should replant my lawn with bermuda since it's apparently indestructible.

I'd like out of the box suggestions of letting it grow as if I intended for it to be there, but I doubt it will ever look intentional unless I planted it everywhere else and I don't need any more grass to take care of. In any case, it's against the HOA.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 12:55PM
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gardengal48

Try acetic acid (vinegar) - it is most effective in the 20% horticultural formulation but regular table vinegar should work too ( but may need a reapplication or two). Just make sure it is a clear sunny day.

I wonder if the HD manager knew they were breaking federal regulations by suggesting RoundUp be used in that manner......the labels and directions printed on any pesticide are legal documents registered under the EPA and using the product any way other than by specified method or dosage is in violation of the law.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 3:11PM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

That (Vinegar) might work in the PNW, but here Bermudagrass is unstoppable.

Yes, you'll burn off the top growth but it'll be right back with the next rain, and the
next, and the next, and the next. Been "eradicating" it for over a decade now.

Here is a link that might be useful: Exotic Invader OR Excellent Lawngrass?

This post was edited by saltcedar on Wed, Mar 19, 14 at 17:58

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 4:54PM
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zzackey(8b GA)

I wish people wouldn't tell you to mix a chemical stronger. The label is the law.

    Bookmark   March 19, 2014 at 6:05PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

There is no shortage of scary information related to the health effects of Roundup (glyphosate) to be read about.

==>>> yes .. and most of it is not true ...

besides.. i simply can not comprehend.. how PROPER use would result in any runoff ... to kill that in your picture... you need about one teardrop of properly diluted product applied to the leaves.. NOT THE DRIVEWAY ... to create runoff.. you will have to be talking about application of gallons of material ...

regardless ... that plant is not your problem... and no matter what grows there... killing it will never solve your problem ...

if it is not apparent.. your problem is... wait for it ... THE CRACK IN THE DRIVEWAY ...

pull out the plant.. best as you can ... doesnt matter if you get it all ... we will be suffocating the roots below ....

AND SEAL THE CRACK ...

all plants need to touch soil ... and there must either be soil [or some kind of compost] in the interface between the two paving materials ... or access to the soil under such ... [ants are happy to do that for me.. on my blacktop driveway ....]

ergo.. ipso .... presto ... cap off access to such.. and you will not get plants growing there ...

ken

    Bookmark   March 21, 2014 at 7:48AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

"pull out the plant.. best as you can ... doesnt matter if you get it all ... we will be suffocating the roots below"

You've clearly never dealt with Bermuda grass. It's rhizomes can be up to four feet into the soil. ANY scrap of which can and will re-sprout. No suffocation will occur if covered or sealed.

Here is a link that might be useful: Devil's Grass! (on a lighter note).

This post was edited by saltcedar on Fri, Mar 21, 14 at 10:48

    Bookmark   March 21, 2014 at 8:45AM
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sheilajoyce_gw

I pour boiling water on my driveway weeds, and it cooks them good.

    Bookmark   March 22, 2014 at 2:55AM
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galinas

Did you try mechanical approach? Have ready tough black plastic bags and some bricks. Cut bags into strips wide enough to cover all the green and the crack itself. Water the crack first, then cover the grass with plastic and use the bricks to hold it in place. Make sure it is as tight as possible. It should kill the grass in several days, especially when it is hot and sunny. No plants can't leave without sun. And wet hit will help them to go faster. BUT... You crack will not stay vacant for long( New seeds from another yard will make to it soon and all will start over again. So may be you need some how permanently fill the crack.

    Bookmark   March 24, 2014 at 1:28PM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

Bermuda rhizomes can survive at a minimum four months without light. I imagine the homeowners association would take a dim view of it being there that long or longer.

    Bookmark   March 24, 2014 at 1:39PM
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