Wild Indigo Alliums?

blakrabMarch 17, 2014

These indigo flowers have root bulbs about the size of quarter. Are they some form of allium or something else? And are they edible?

Here is a link that might be useful:

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
fatamorgana2121(Zone 5/6)

Grape Hyacinths, Muscari

FataMorgana

    Bookmark   March 17, 2014 at 8:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blakrab

Interesting, thanks!

Grape Hyacinths are actually a part of the lily family; their name results from the fact that they look like hyacinths. From the genus Muscari, these easy to grow bulbs are winter hardy in zones 3-9. One bulb results in a single flower, which reaches about 10 inches in height. For maximum impact, consider planting a large grouping of grape hyacinths. In addition to a pretty landscape, youâÂÂll also enjoy the lovely musk-like scent each time you wander past.
http://www.ask.com/explore/how-grow-grape-hyacinths

There is some question over their toxicity if eaten?

Grape hyacinths, often grown for their fragrant smell, are not toxic. However, it is easy to confuse them with common hyacinths, which are.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grape-hyacinth-bulbs-poisonous-81618.html

Grape Hyacinth contains comisic acid which acts like a saponin, this can be poisonous to some species especially fish. It is poorly absorbed by the human body. Has been used with other species of Muscari, for its diuretic and stimulant properties. Conflicting information in sources list M. armeniacum as poisonous and non-poisonous, we have erred on the safe side and list it as poisonous.

Here is a link that might be useful: Muscari armeniacum

    Bookmark   March 17, 2014 at 8:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)(7b)

I doubt these are M. armeniacum, as those are quite rare in the States and have numerous flowers on long pedicels. They aren't M. comosum, because those have pedicels rising, instead of nodding. The two remaining, and our most common species are M. botryoides and M. neglectum. M. neglectum has perianth tubes that are oblong and blackish-blue, and 20-40 flowers per raceme. M. botryoides has perianth tubes that are globose, and sky blue. Your plant is likely Muscari botryoides, which is often called the Common Grape Hyacinth.

    Bookmark   March 17, 2014 at 9:22PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Who knows what type of orchid this is?
I keep getting these "Unusual Plant" emails....
Scooby D. Labbé
Please ID this plant
I think it came in an indoor pot of plants. It is...
elaineal
Late-blooming aster in a Colorado canyon
I shot this in late September in Cache la Poudre Canyon,...
Joe_Pye
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™