can you id this grub photo

anita55(zone 6 NY)September 16, 2008

Can anyone tell me what kind of insect this huge grub will become? I was adding compost to a few bare spots in my lawn when I found him. I dug up a square of earth and didn't find any others; I was happy to see many many earthworms. Could this grub be enjoying my organic fertilizers?

My lawn:

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
decklap(5IL)

The best way to ID a grub is by the chafer pattern on their rumps and even with a good hand lens it can be difficult. Organic ferts don't attract grubs anymore so than any other ferts do. Having a few here and there don't amount to any trouble and usually infestation levels hover around 10 per sq. ft. depending on the species.

    Bookmark   September 16, 2008 at 2:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anita55(zone 6 NY)

Hi thanks, ya , I thought maybe the size of him might tell you what he is. I've never seen such a big fat grub before.

    Bookmark   September 16, 2008 at 3:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dbw7(6a)

The term is Raster pattern and here is a link. decklap is right about # per sqft.

Here is a link that might be useful: OSU site

    Bookmark   September 16, 2008 at 3:06PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anita55(zone 6 NY)

That I'm supposed to be looking at? Does cooperative extension identify lawn pests or who else could I ask?

    Bookmark   September 17, 2008 at 3:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
decklap(5IL)

Yeah, regardless of what you call it you ID 'em by the hair on their butts. But it'd probably be easier to get an idea of what it is simply by checking to see what species are active in your area this time of year.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2008 at 3:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anita55(zone 6 NY)

Well, i live in the lower hudson valley of new york state. Where would I find that kind of information (about grub activity at this time of the year). Thank you!

    Bookmark   September 17, 2008 at 5:12PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardenfanatic(MO zone5b)

That's the type of grub that is commonly found in compost piles. It feeds on decomposing organic matter, not lawn roots.

Deanna

Here is a link that might be useful: Compost Grub

    Bookmark   September 17, 2008 at 10:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anita55(zone 6 NY)

Thanks, Deanna, then I guess this is not one to worry about in my lawn. I wonder what the adults are, and what they feed on. Do you know if they travel far because I don't have fruit or vegetables in my yard, except for apples. Interesting.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2008 at 7:22AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardenfanatic(MO zone5b)

You said you have apples in your yard? A beetle could have laid eggs in your yard because of the apple tree, knowing that when the grubs pupated into beetles, they'd have a food source right there.

Did you say you spread compost over your yard? It could have been that a beetle egg was in the compost, and it hatched after the compost had been spread in your yard. Or if you have a garden that you put compost in, or do lasagna gardening, the grub could have crawled over from that area. I found a big fat one where I had piled up lots of organic matter to decompose over the winter so I could plant some roses in the spring.

The fruit beetle isn't the only beetle that produces huge grubs that eat decomposing materials, so it could also be one of the other ones. The thing that really distinguishes these grubs from lawn grubs is the size. Lawn grubs are fairly small compared to the big fat composting type grubs.

Deanna

    Bookmark   September 18, 2008 at 4:35PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anita55(zone 6 NY)

Hi Deanna, I haven't spread compost over my whole lawn, ever. I just spot treat, and I've actually never seen such a large grub before! I sure have seen the other grubs and the Japanese Beetles that they turn into. I've been using organic products like cornmeal gluten, and fish emulsion, the Lazy Man products, and 2 treatments of Milorganite over the past couple of years. i'm trying to stay away from chemical and my lawn looks pretty good most of the time. It took some doing to convince my lawn mowing company to mow high, but since they've been cooperating I'm very happy with it. I've also stopped using my automatic sprinklers except for occasionally when it hasn't rained the whole week. I've gotten good advice here and it seems to be working.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2008 at 6:38PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
spreader settings not on fertilizer bags?
I recently had a soil test(s) on my yard and had a...
hc803
Artificial Grass Maintenance?
I'm newbie in gardening. I want to know what kind of...
kevin497
I need lawn renovation help in Zone 7/8
I want to renovate my 24,000 sq ft lawn. The problem...
tless195
I need a lawn "redo". More weeds than grass and more...
Here's the skinny. We live in Jacksonville, FL. Everybody...
Rich Possert
St Augustine grass problems
Hello all-- I live in Florida on the gulf coast with...
mike153
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™