Fuseables by Pan Am seeds

Susanne27(5a Ontario Canada)February 25, 2013

I will be starting seeds soon for my summer containers. This year I am going to try some of the new fuseables - 2 varieties in a single pellet. Has anyone tried starting these yet? If so how did they turn out and how hard were they to germinate. Thank you, Sue

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dirtguy50 SW MO z6a(6a)

What is "new fuseables - 2 varieties in a single pellet"?

    Bookmark   February 25, 2013 at 7:35PM
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goblugal(7)

Most of the "Fuseables" actually have 3 varieties in a multipellet. Most of them are single species mixes: 3 petunia varieties, 3 coleus varieties. Some are multi-species, and will have 2 petunias and a bacopa. As a professional grower, we find them easy to germinate, but I do have some issues with the concept. They finish out "ok"...but I think individual plants in a mixed container is much more effective

    Bookmark   February 27, 2013 at 1:27PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Check the Pam-Am (Ballhort) site. Multi-seed pellets produce competitive plants in a tight space that retards growth of the plants.
Makes sense to me.
IMHO, single seeds are better for the home garden.
I am disolving my pellets and planting the seeds individually.
I want strong growth, not retarded growth because of unnecessary competition.

This post was edited by bugbite on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 11:35

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 9:09AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Bob - hope you don't mind if I address your question. I'm sure globugal will have more to add.

Many things are not normally "single seeded" by either commercial or amateur growers. This includes many of the low-growing flowers, herbs, and even a few of the leafy green vegetables.

Have you ever direct seeded any garden flowers or herbs? They are often cluster sown and no, thinning is not needed. Like petunias, bacopa, alyssum, coleus, etc. portulaca is one of those and grows quite well in small clusters. The same approach works fine in cell packs too as long as the cluster won't be in the small cell for long. So when we seed we put several seeds in each cell if using cell packs. If using flats you can just scatter seed them.

Then when it comes time to make up containers/hanging baskets for sale they are planted using those individual cells that have been multi-seeded.

dave

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 11:06AM
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goblugal(7)

Bob,
Dave pretty much covered it. Most things that are sold in a multi-seeded pellet are produced that way because a single plant of that variety doesn't make a very attractive finished product. Alyssum, Portulaca, Lobelia are typically multi-seeded due to growth habit - singles are straggly looking, and take a long time to fill out. Even if we are using raw seed. we still multisow those crops to make a better end product.

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 1:47PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Pam Am produces fusables with highly competitive petunias.
I certainly can see that some plants with tiny root systems could work.
Thanks,
Bob

This post was edited by bugbite on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 11:11

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 1:51PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

They perform just fine even months down the road assuming they have been properly transplanted.

I think what may be confusing you is the old adage of "1 seed=1 stem" and that is true for the most part but it isn't meant to mean you can ONLY plant 1 seed.

Lots of things are not normally grown as single stem plants.- even in nature - so why would you want to grow them that way?

A 1" square cell in a 6 pack seeded with 6-8 alyssum seeds form a perfect cluster when can then be transplanted into a large container mixed with other flower clumps of differing heights or into a flower bed and continue to grow beautifully. You wouldn't get nearly the same appearance trying to plant individual stems of the plant into the container.

Obviously this can't be done with everything. You'd never do it with tomatoes or peppers or sunflowers or maybe the big geraniums . But marigolds, poppies, and petunias, plus all the ones listed above as well as hundreds of others are all normally sown using multiple seeds. In the vegetable garden one commonly finds multi-seeded cukes, melons, squash, lettuce, spinach, and bunching onions.

A very general guideline is it is done with the tiny seeds but there are clearly exceptions to that guideline.

If you have a local nursery why not visit early in the season and browse all their trays and note which cell pack contain multiple plants vs those with only single plants.

Dave

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 4:13PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

My typical Marigold root system. Hmm.... four of these in one hole, how would that work?

This post was edited by bugbite on Fri, Mar 1, 13 at 10:45

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 6:33PM
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715rose

I'm glad to see this addressed but I'm still not sure I "get" it. I like the look of 2 different color petunias in a pot.If they are in the same pellet aren't they too close together?Can I just plant 2 different ones close together in my container ? Actually ,I did this last spring.But they weren't as close as if in same pellet.

rose

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 6:37PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Rose,
Please click the link below. It will tell you why not to plant petunias too close.
Thanks,
Bob

Here is a link that might be useful: The fight for the nutrients

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 6:49PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

If they are in the same pellet aren't they too close together?

That's the whole point of the discussion Rose. They are not.

Bob - let me try it this way. Have you ever bought a big hanging basket of petunias or examined one closely? How many plants do you think are in the hanging basket?

4 portulaca seedlings can excel when planted in 1/32"

You keep stressing the 1/32" but it isn't applicable. The roots of the plants can expand to whatever amount of space is provided to them be that into a container of some size or into the ground. Those 2 seedlings may begin in a flat of 50 or in a 1" cell which is quickly transplanted to either a 4" pot or mixed with 10-12 others to fill a 12" basket or mixed with many others to fill a 16" or a 20" container.

Does that help?

Dave

    Bookmark   February 28, 2013 at 8:07PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Dave,
I am sure your baskets are great. You know perfectly which 10-12 plants can create the perfectly full look at the retail level. Your expertise and knowledge is commendable.

But my experience is clear to me. It took a lot of wasted time and money to get there.
I achieve best performance when I follow the seed developers guidelines for a variety. I try to follow their spacing and care directions for optimum plant performance in the garden.
I will call on the Park Seeds catalog for an example of how space requirements can vary by variety. Re: petunias... Merlin Blue Morn should be spaced 30" apart for best performance; Aladdin, 18" apart. Many plants; many different needs. I try to understand the space requirement for each plant. It pays off. I learned my lessons over the years, spacing plants too close may get a nice full look, but spacing according to the needs of the variety will get me a much better, healthy, robust plant which will branch better and be easier to care for and a plant that performs longer.
We function in two different gardening worlds; I do well in mine, you in yours. And that's a good thing.

This post was edited by bugbite on Fri, Mar 1, 13 at 17:01

    Bookmark   March 1, 2013 at 10:40AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

No problem at all. There is no one "right" way to do anything, just alternatives to consider. :)

Dave

    Bookmark   March 1, 2013 at 12:25PM
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Susanne27(5a Ontario Canada)

Thank you to goblugal for answering my question. As a professional you find that it is more effective to just use a variety of single plants. I've bought the seed already so will have to do with them this year. Others years I have chosen my container combination by growing a variety of single plants and then planting them mixed in barrels etc. I guess I will find out for myself and will have a good basis of comparison from other years. Thanks again. Sue

    Bookmark   March 1, 2013 at 3:29PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Susanne,
Let us know how it turns out.
Thanks,
Bob

This post was edited by bugbite on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 11:13

    Bookmark   March 2, 2013 at 10:57AM
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Susanne27(5a Ontario Canada)

I will follow up with results on Pan Am Fuseables. I might also add that I started a new seed starting regime last year that worked out better than ever for me and will be using this method this year with all my seeds including the fuseables. I used to start my seeds by planting several seeds in a 3 inch pot and then thinning to one strong plant. Last year I tried something different. I planted one seed only in a plug and planted plenty to make up for the ones that won't germinate. They came up and thrived showing after a while a really vigorous root growth. At that point, I then planted the plug and all into a 3 inch pot with good seed starting soil. The results were amazing and the plants shot up so well that I decided to delay seed starting by three weeks this year. I should also mention that I start my plants in a warm sunny area on a heat mat and covered with a clear top. As soon as they individually germinate I remove them from the cover. After a few days they go down in the basement under lights and in a cool environment. This way they grow slowly, thickly and strongly. I harden off my plants for a few weeks outside in the spring - bringing them inside at night if it threatens to be too cold.

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 4:23PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Susanne,
I am always experimenting and would like to know about the plugs. What type do you use? I would like to look them up since they were successful for you.
There would be many benefits to a plug senario.
Thanks,
Bob

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 4:35PM
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Susanne27(5a Ontario Canada)

Yes I just realized that I didn't mean plugs but meant the small peat pellets that swell up tremendously when you soak them with warn water. You can then just press the seed on top if it is not to be covered or cover it lightly with a small amount of lightweight seeding soil. If a pellet does not produce a seed, then the pellet can be reseeded with something else. I used to have to do a lot of spraying to keep my seedlings moist. I find with the pellets I just add water to the container and the pellets take it right up to the seedlings - a much safer way of watering I think.

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 4:58PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Thanks Susanne,
I have plenty of those; should get them out of storage and try them again.
I am getting interested in the 200 or 288 cell plug trays, but may never find them in non-case quantities to try them.
Thanks for your reply,
Bob

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 5:07PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Bob- plug flats can be bought in packs of 10 for $15 at link below.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: Plug flats

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 5:26PM
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bugbite(z9a FL)

Thanks Dave!

    Bookmark   March 3, 2013 at 9:12PM
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nisinj(7a)

Susanne27, how did the fuseables turn out for you? I am about to start some in 3" pots, planning to combine the contents of 3 pots into a hanging basket later. I would like to know your experience last year.

    Bookmark   February 9, 2014 at 10:49PM
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