Burning Bush Transplant

jparkins_ohio(5a OH)May 9, 2011

I have a neighbor who is redoing his beds. He has 3 burning bushes that he wants to get rid of because they are not getting enough sun and they don't display the dark color in the winter. As you can see from the photos they are very large and have grown into each other. I am debating on taking these and planting in them in a full sun location in my landscape bed - see picture. My question is, how hard can I cut these back? And if I cut them back hard, how long will they take to regain their foliage?

Here is where I want to place them...spaced out along the side of the house. Lilac will go in the corner near the fence and a weeping cheery tree is going in where the rock is at the front of the bed.

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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

they are invasive in many areas .. we dont like to encourage such ....

and probably available at the big box store for a few bucks ...

in my world ... warped as it is.. i would not waste a full day of back breaking labor to dig up a bunch of giant plants ... to save 30 bucks ...

otherwise.. dad had some like that.. that he basically butchered to 6 inches.. and in a few years.. they were back to height .... so you could take them down to a manageable size of say 3 feet ... for digging and transport ...

the problem is going to be the roots which will be as big.. if not bigger than the largest branches.. and that is going to be some hardcore digging ...

its just not worth it .. there is usually a big difference between what CAN be done.. and what SHOULD be done ....

work smart.. not hard ... is my motto ....

ken

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 8:49AM
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esh_ga

Yes, it is considered invasive in Ohio.

Here is a link that might be useful: Ohio - weed of the month

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 10:59AM
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jparkins_ohio(5a OH)

Can you explain "invasive". does that mean they will take over that area and not let anything else grow around it?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 11:24AM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

it means birds eat the berries.. and spread them far and wide ... and they out compete natives and the good stuff ... even though you may never see another on your property ...

regardless.. you are thinking of putting a $8 plant next to a very nice looking house.. you can do better ... AND NOT WORK THAT HARD ....

ken

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 11:57AM
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esh_ga

It means they can do things like this to natural areas:

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 9:57PM
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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

Invasives significantly displace native flora and/or fauna. In some ways, planting an invasive plant is kind of like throwing trash out the window that could multiply exponentially over time (invasives = exponentially-reproducing biological litter).

    Bookmark   May 10, 2011 at 11:57PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

check out the link

how about something fragrant that will knock your socks off for a few weeks in late spring

where are you in OH .... if NE... you ought to check out girards in saybrook ...

if NW.. let me know ....

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: link

    Bookmark   May 11, 2011 at 4:27PM
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jparkins_ohio(5a OH)

Ken - I live in NW Ohio (Lima).

thanks for everyone's comments. I think I'm going to not go the burning bush direction.

What do you think of these two options? Both will give great fall color and also spring blooms.

Choice 1: Fothergilla
Option 2: Diablo Ninebark

    Bookmark   May 12, 2011 at 10:56AM
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esh_ga

Both are good full-sun native shrubs. Fothergilla will give you a more upright look with early spring blooms while Ninebark has an arching habit (very nice if left unpruned which you should) and it flowers later in the spring.

All the new Ninebark cultivars have spectacular year-round foliage color when sited in full-sun. I think for that reason, it would the one to consider (and you have plenty of space for it). I like 'Coppertina' and 'Center Glow' which are not as dark colored as Diablo.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2011 at 12:59PM
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marymd7

I like both fothergilla and physocarpus (ninebark). Of the two, I lean more towards fothergilla. The fall color is outstanding with enough sun. Great shrub. The Mt. Airy cultivar is great and reasonably readily available.

Here is a link that might be useful: UConn Plant Database on fothergilla major

    Bookmark   May 12, 2011 at 1:01PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

you have room for more than one plant..

but never plant more than one of anything ... just in case some plague comes along ...

one of each of the above.. plus i highly recommend a fragrant viburnam ... they should be blooming right now at any good nursery.. go take a whiff and see if you can walk away.. lol ...

ken

    Bookmark   May 12, 2011 at 1:06PM
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