I Hate Plants That Spread

yardenman(z7 MD)April 18, 2011

What are your best recommendations for Zone 7 for perennial plants that stay put but give good flowering in sun to half-sunny light?

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
echinaceamaniac(7)

Coreopsis "Jethro Tull"
Penstemon "Dark Towers"
Penstemon "Mystica"
Amsonia "Blue Ice"

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 12:50AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

A nearly infinite list of plants could be generated by your question, especially in lovely zone 7. Most plants will increase their size in some way. As a general rule, though, plants to avoid are those that produce runners or copious amounts of seeds. Do you have a bloom color preference? Height preference? Any issues with drainage, rabbits, deer? Do you prefer fragrant flowers? With the number of plants that fit your initial request, you can afford to be much more specific.

I might recommend getting your own personal copy of "the bible" - The Well-Tended Perennial Garden by Track DiSabato-Aust, or at least check it out of your library. My other favorite book is Botanica's Annuals & Perennials. This is the most comprehensive list of flowering (2,000) plants I've ever seen, with pictures of most.

In the past, I've never had the results I wanted by starting my planning with the question "what do I want?" The chances of finding those particular plants in a store near you are not always good. Lots of people do it, but I'm not comfortable ordering plants from faraway places by mail or internet. So I find it's best to shop around, see what's available, then decide "which of these plants do I like?" From there, you can determine which of those would perform to your satisfaction in your garden.

    Bookmark   April 19, 2011 at 10:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
yardenman(z7 MD)

Well, I guess that was a rather open-ended question. What I meant was that I want only groups of individual plants like astilbe or mums and it is difficult to tell that from plant descriptions in catalogs. For some reason, they don't like to say "invasive", LOL!

I seem to have bad luck and end up with perennials that want to spread all over the garden I had to dig up all the Knautia last year because of self-seeding up to 10' away. I am going to dig up the Teucrium because it just keeps creepin over its neighbors. The Salvia Purple Knockout ends up everywhere (and in the lawn). The last straw was the Lysimachia Firecracker I received mislabelled as Coreopsis Golden Gain and is now threatening to take over my garden.

So I thought suggestions of nice polite perennials from people who have them seemed like a good idea.

Basically, my garden has (of the polite plants) Coneflower, Astilbe, Stella D'Oro, Aquilegia, Trollius, Autumn Joy Sedum, Veronica, Stokesia, Aster, Mum, Hostas, Ferns, Heuchera, Liatris, and Oriental Daylilies.

Any other types I should explore?

    Bookmark   April 20, 2011 at 6:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

You're talking yourself through your own answer (smiles!) Almost anything suggested as a ground cover, anything "creeping" and heavy seed producers are going to displease you. Here's a few to consider...

Delphinium
Iris
bulbs for earlier
Baptisia
Thalictrum
Brunnera
Bergenia
Polemonium
Dianthus (will spread politely)
Creeping Phlox (will spread politely)
some of the fragrant, tall garden Phlox (selection varies by geographical area)

Any interest in bigger plants like roses, peony, beauty berry, hydrangea, butterfly bushes? All extremely polite, non-fussy residents.

    Bookmark   April 20, 2011 at 7:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
yardenman(z7 MD)

Sorry, I should have mentioned shrubs. The background is butterfly bushes, nandina, euonymous, and spring flowering almond shrub.

And I forgot the baptisia, which make a great backdrop to the deck. But the others, those are suggestions I will look up. And THANK YOU so much for them!

    Bookmark   April 21, 2011 at 12:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wieslaw59

I'd like to warn you : Polemonium caeruleum is a terrible seeder. You will regret it bitterly. Tall garden phloxes do not stay put. Many varieties send runners, David being the worst of all. Brunnera is a seeder as well as Thalictrum, especially aquilegifolium, but you can cut the spent flower stalks of.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 6:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
laceyvail(6A, WV)

Well, folks, if you don't want plants to reseed, don't let them!!! Just cut them back before the seed is set. It's simple and it's what gardeners do! It's called tending your garden.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 6:17AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wieslaw59

Basically I agree with laceyvail. But in cases like Polemonium caeruleum or Tradescantia it would be too much work. It would involve removing individual flowers, and I don't think they are worth the trouble.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 6:30AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
I love wood Anemones...
Or Anemone nemorosa. They are just starting to poke...
christinmk z5b eastern WA
Need help with Chrysanthemum please?
Last fall I purchased a nice mum from my local nursery....
gardenbug
Trillium 2015
This thread is for anyone who wants to post pics of...
gardenprincethenetherlandsZ7/8
Elk in Dogs for mrtulin
The link is in here scroll down and have fun. Some...
Patty W. zone 5a Illinois
Sponsored Products
Emberglow Botanical Arrangement
$699.00 | FRONTGATE
Juuyo Peach Flowers Pendant
Lightology
Roosters Area Rug
Home Decorators Collection
4D Concepts Espresso Bathroom Storage Tower with Hamper - 87623
$176.00 | Hayneedle
Mandarin Area Rug
Home Decorators Collection
Heavenly Peonies Faux Floral Arrangement
$260.00 | Horchow
Fosters Point Vase With Hydrangearangea Queen Anne's Lace Garland F9083
Beyond Stores
Anderson Teak Montebello Patio Dining Set - SR-048-TERRACOTTA
Hayneedle
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™