Huge Shrub W/Fragrant White Flower Clusters

blakrabOctober 25, 2013

These tiny flowers are very fragrant, noticeably within a few feet. They are approximately the size of small BBs. The shrubs may be ~10'-15' tall with gray trunks and are buzzing with bees feeding on them.

Here is a link that might be useful:

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thedecoguy

Baccharis salicifolia.

    Bookmark   October 26, 2013 at 12:33AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

I don't think someone from the UK is in a position to ID our native plants.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2013 at 8:23PM
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blakrab

Ah, so this is probably also Poverty Weed (Baccharis neglecta)...just with the flowers in bloom rather than the "paintbrush" seeds that appear after..?
http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/namegal/msg1023095216418.html

Or is it a Groundsel Tree (Baccharis halimifolia)?
http://www.biosurvey.ou.edu/okwild/gstree.html
Ugh, they all look basically the same??? :o

Here is a link that might be useful: Baccharis neglecta

This post was edited by blakrab on Sun, Dec 22, 13 at 21:08

    Bookmark   December 22, 2013 at 9:03PM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

Yes, seedheads versus flowers.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2013 at 9:19PM
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esh_ga

Doesn't Baccharis has different looking male and female flowers? These look like the male flowers.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2013 at 10:03PM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

True but by now the seedheads should be fully formed.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2013 at 10:23PM
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thedecoguy

Sorry, I didn't realise this was exclusively a site for US residents!

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 12:30AM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Yeah, the British don't know anything about plants and have never imported and grown plants from outside of Britain.

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 1:32AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

Merely stating we know our species better just as the Brits know theirs.
5 minutes of research would have borne out that Baccharis salicifolia isn't found in central Texas.

This post was edited by saltcedar on Mon, Dec 23, 13 at 1:46

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 1:40AM
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TulsaRose z7a, Tulsa OK(7a)

So, doing a Google search for Baccharis salicifolia in Texas, one should ignore the results?

I guess the point of my post is, there is absolutely no need to be rude to a member that at least responded to a query made two months ago.

Happy Holidays!

Here is a link that might be useful: Baccharis salicifolia in Texas

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 6:33AM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

That response was meant for another post on the same subject and came off as rude and terse. I didn't mean to offend anyone, I was just saying what the OP suggested was unlikely.

This post was edited by saltcedar on Mon, Dec 23, 13 at 7:37

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 7:35AM
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blakrab

Well, thanks for all the valuable input everyone, local and non! Obviously local expertise is very valuable for natives...but that certainly doesn't preclude remote analysis either! I always appreciate anyone who simply even bothers to reply! :)
http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/namegal/msg1212553829322.html

And this particular ID does seem rather complex. There appears to be some very similar species here and possibly even different male/female flowers in the same ones? So, what are the distinguishing differences and what exactly is the plant in question, then?

Baccharis salicifolia "Mule's Fat"
Baccharis neglecta "Poverty Weed"
Baccharis halimifolia "Groundsel Tree"

Baccharis is a genus of perennials and shrubs in the aster family (Asteraceae). They are commonly known as baccharises but sometimes referred to as "brooms", because many members have small thin leaves resembling the true brooms. Baccharis, with over 500 species, is the largest genus in the Compositae. It is found throughout the Americas

Here is a link that might be useful: Baccharis

This post was edited by blakrab on Mon, Dec 23, 13 at 12:08

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 12:05PM
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jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)(7b)

This one made me curious, so I checked BONAP. Their maps confirm11 Baccharis species in Texas. Five of those (bigelovii, brachyphylla, havardii, pteronioides, and sarothroides) are known only in the extreme southwest corner of the state. B. halimifolia is common in east Texas, but has rhombic leaves. The five species more common in the central portion are neglecta, salicifolia, salicina, texana, and wrightii.

I used the FNA (Flora of North America) key for Baccaris species to check properties. B. texana and B. wrightii are subshrubs that typically range from 10 to 80 cm tall. Since the OP said the plants are much taller than that, the last three species are more likely.

B. neglecta has very narrow leaves that are linear to narrowly elliptic, and usually 30 to 80 mm long by just 1 to 2 mm wide. The leaves in the photo seem to be much wider than that.

B. salicina has leaves that are oblong to narrowly oblanceolate, entire margins, or with 2-3 pairs of coarsely and irregularly serrate teeth toward the ends. Typical leaves are 25 to 70 mm long by 5 to 10 mm wide.

B. salicifolia has leaves that are lanceolate to oblong, usually with finely serrate margins and resinous faces. Typical leaves are 30 to 150 mm long by 3 to 20 mm wide.

It isn't possible to determine species without a sample in hand. However, it does seem that B. salicifolia is a strong candidate. If you want to investigate further, the BONAP maps for Baccharis are here http://www.bonap.org/BONAPmaps2010/Baccharis.html and the FNA key is at the site below.

Here is a link that might be useful: FNA US Baccharis key

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 5:53PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Oh get Bach

Get Bach

Get Baccharis to where it once belonged

    Bookmark   December 23, 2013 at 9:37PM
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jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)(7b)

Somebody has spiked the eggnog.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 9:09AM
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blakrab

..."oblanceolate???"

Wow, damn jekeesl, you really did your homework here. I'm going to go with your expert analysis and...Baccharis salicifolia "Mule's Fat" it is, then!

Many, many Thanks & Happy Holidays everyone!!

Here is a link that might be useful: Baccharis US map

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 1:13PM
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saltcedar(Sunset zn 30/usda 8b)

Baccharis salicina would be my guess.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 2:25PM
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jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)(7b)

Saltcedar is probably right. B. salicina is more plentiful across the state. It should be easy to determine species if you have a sample in hand.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 3:00PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

I don't drink, you'll have to blame it on something else.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 5:18PM
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jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)(7b)

Yeah, well I've been humming that all evening.

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 9:12PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Good!

    Bookmark   December 24, 2013 at 10:29PM
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