Another buried-pet question

PeasherFebruary 20, 2014

Hi, noob here.

Asher, my blue heeler, will never suffer again after next Thursday. I can't bring myself to say it any other way.

We plan to bring her home in a box (no way I'll be able to bear carrying her carcass) and bury her. I've read about depth and preventing disturbance from scavengers & other animals, and plan to cover her grave site temporarily with pavers.

In honor and remembrance of her wonderful ability to soothe me when my heart is troubled, I have decided to plant chamomile seeds indoors and transplant them over her when the seedlings are ready.

She is not diseased or on medication, just old and her body is giving up on her. Is there any reason, once the chamomile is ready, it could not be harvested for tea?

Thank you in advance for any input, suggestions, advice, etc.

(This picture is several years old. It's Asher in her prime.)

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poaky1

Poor pooch, I had to put my Brandy down after she couldn't walk anymore. She couldn't stand up to make poo in the yard anymore. She was about 15 yrs old. Not sure what your vet can do to make it most peaceful or okay for you. But My vet put my Brandy in a compostable zip up bag. I would say from the name, DUH, the remains go back to the earth. I put my Brandy in an area that I may have to add soil to in a couple years. It really sucks when you have to make the decision to end their life, vs. them going on their own.

    Bookmark   February 20, 2014 at 11:23PM
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poaky1

My Brandy was a Chow Chow German shepherd mix. Nobody may care, but I wanted to add that.

    Bookmark   February 20, 2014 at 11:26PM
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mckenziek(9CA)

So sorry for your loss. I don't know the answer to your question, but I can't see why it would be a problem to harvest the chamomile. At my property there is a concrete tomb marked "He was our friend." I can only assume it is a dog of a previous owner. I think I will plant some flowers around it. Maybe some poppies.

    Bookmark   February 20, 2014 at 11:30PM
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lazy_gardens

Tips on composting/burying larger animals - dig the hole about 3x or more deeper than the torso. Replace all the soil, mounding it over the excavated area. Place a heavy slab or rocks over the mound. They will settle as the body decomposes, and can be removed in a couple of years if you want to.

There's no reason you shouldn't be able to use the chamomile. It's not a cow with anthrax.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 10:32AM
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robertz6

I put my 70 pounder buddy under my compost pile. Dug into the clay soil with a pick and rounded shovel. Put wood chips below and above. Placed several layers of newspapers down, then put the regular compost material back.

This way there is no concerns about odors, and space is saved.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 3:06PM
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toxcrusadr

So sorry to hear. We had to say goodbye to our gardening helper kitty, Tiger Stripe, last fall. She really loved the outdoors and she will rest under the St. Francis statue in the shady bed where she lived when we first found her (or she found us?).

I don't know about chamomile, but most plant roots (excluding large shrubs and trees) are within the first 6-12" of soil anyway.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 5:14PM
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Peasher

Thank you for the responses. And poaky1, I don't see why it wouldn't be important that Brandy was a Shepher/Chow mix. She must have been big!

Asher is 40 pounds. I have her grave site picked out and will start digging over the weekend. I have concrete pavers ready to cover the mound with, and have made a small marker with her paw print and name. I will paint it to look like her fur as well as I can, and waterproof it. I don't know how long it will stand up to the elements but she kept me company while I worked on it so it's another memory of her I will be able to cherish.

lazygardens, thanks for the tips. Figuring out the logistics ahead of time will (should) make "the day" go more smoothly, and is helping me prepare mentally for the reality we're facing. I don't know that there is any way to prepare emotionally, I'll cross that bridge when Asher crosses hers.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 7:13PM
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kathy9norcal

Animals bring us so much joy and that is why it is so heart-rending when we have to say goodby to them. I am sorry you are going through this right now. We had a previous dog put down--it was such a peaceful procedure. My last two dogs that left me--I had them cremated and they are sitting in boxes near the mantle. I didn't want to leave them in a yard I may not have for ever. It brings me comfort.

However, our cat is in the ground and I planted a beautiful vine over her recently. It has wonderful purple flowers blooming right now.

I know I didn't answer your question. Someone else will, I am sure. Your post just touched my heart.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 8:22PM
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jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

The chamomile will be okay to harvest.

    Bookmark   February 21, 2014 at 9:07PM
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ernie85017

Wow, you all got me teary thinking of the animals I have had to put in the ground.

No concerns over anything that grows over your friend's grave. DO put the pavers over the grave. My little dog managed to smell one of the cats and dug down to her
. They decompose rather quickly if laid to rest in their natural state. I was digging a new bed the other day and unearthed both chicken and cat bones that were buried in the last couple of years, at least the cat was. I had already forgotten where I had put her. The ferals seem to come to me when they need help leaving their sick bodies.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 2:25PM
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farmerkevin(USDA 9)

I had to respond because reading the op, brought tear to my eyes. I had a German shepherd that lived to be about 14. She was with me from when my brother died when I was 10 to when I was 22. She was already a couple/few years old, but she was with me through the hardest parts of my life. From when I lost my brother, to when I was an akward teenager, to when I hated the world. She loved me no matter what.

When the time came to put her down, I cried and cried and cried. I guess when she passed, it was like my brother was passing all over again.

I was living at a place I knew I wasn't going to be at forever, and barely had a place to stay. I didn't want to bury her there, and I didn't think to get her ashes. I was too upset. It took me hours to make a 30 minute drive.

Anyways, sounds like Asher is well loved. She was lucky to have found a wonderful family.

After my pup passed, I almost immediately got another pup. No to replace moonlight, but to give another pup a home.

Oh and it sounds like if Asher is buried deep enough, the chamomile should be ok. I have an avocado planted above the previous owner of the houses dog, buddy. Should be fine.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 3:50PM
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poaky1

Although not garden related, it gives you an opportunity to save another shelter animal. Although you will still miss the dog who was sick and is now gone, it seems like saving another animal helps, unless you can't for whatever reason. I haven't because I have a Newfie with diabetes, so I couldn't afford to anyway, insulin for a 135 lb dog isn't cheap, the Newfie is really attention giving and wanting, so I can't imagine adopting another while he is around. My mom who I live with has 3 dogs so no lack of canine love here. Plus many cats here.

    Bookmark   February 23, 2014 at 6:59PM
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