when to apply wilf-pruf

tom_mn(z4b_MN)November 14, 2009

I do not live in an area where broadleaved evergreens are normally grown, so I do not have anyone locally to ask. When is the best time to apply wilt-pruf to hollies and rhododendrons, or is any time just fine?

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dorothyz6

I apply Wilt-pruf every year with great success. Protection lasts about 3 months, so I apply in early to mid December and one application usually does it for the season for my zone. The company says it can be applied any time, as long as the solution does not freeze on the foliage and has time to dry during daylight hours. Personally, I pick a 35 degree or more day, even though I've been assured by the company that it doesn't matter what the thermometer reads, as long as the product doesn't freeze on the foliage. Their suggestion was to throw a glass of water on the foliage, if the water freezes, Wilt-pruf should not be applied. Hope this helps.

Dorothy

    Bookmark   November 14, 2009 at 9:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tom_mn(z4b_MN)

Yes, that is very helpful, thank you. I am not sure that I can wait that long here in zone 4. Can you reuse the product next year, or does the sprayer clog up with gunk and it's just a one day deal?

    Bookmark   November 14, 2009 at 11:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dorothyz6

I would only measure out and use as much product as you think you'll need and clean out the sprayer thoroughly afterward for the best results. Wilt-pruf can be stored in its original container and used again next year if it doesn't freeze. Good luck.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 12:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

When? Probably never.

Here is a link that might be useful: Microsoft Word - B&B #25 - antitranspirants.doc - Powered by Google Docs

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 5:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tom_mn(z4b_MN)

I don't agree with the article, which quotes research done in a moist, mild winter climate (not mine). I am trying to push broadleaved evergreens beyond their normal range. I am not trying to cover up deficient soil moisture or cut other corners. Plants are not going to be actively growing while the product is on the leaves and it will wear off before spring growth, so no issues with heat build up or gas exchange.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 6:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

>I don't agree with the article, which quotes research done in a moist, mild winter climateI see no indication of that. I do see this statement:

The scientific literature on antitranspirants is robust; numerous antitranspirants have been tested for their
effect upon desiccation, disease control, fruit production, transplant establishment, and weed control.
Research has been conducted in the lab, greenhouse, nursery, and field on a variety of plants ranging from
vegetable crops to house plants to fruit and timber species

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 6:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dorothyz6

The research aside, the first year I used it, I did my own test: one fall planted rhoddie sprayed with Wilt-pruf -- one without. Here in eastern MA with drying winds, freezing temperatures and varying degrees of snow fall, the rhoddie sprayed with the Wilt-pruf came through the winter in much better shape than the one without. Both had received the same level of care prior to winter. I've never seen any adverse effects from it and the cost is well worth the potential of having to replace expensive broadleaf evergreens. Just my opinion.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 7:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WendyB(5A/MA)

I've used WiltPruf to try to protect some borderline hollies. Doesn't work. The only hollies that make it through here are Blue Princess and Blue Prince (no wilt pruf needed). Even though others claim to be Z5, they have just enough Z6 in them to not make it. side by side locations.

Doesn't mean Wilt Pruf might not help some in some situations, but it won't push a zone.

Also, most of the broadleaf evergreens seem to have their worst time in March and April. The soil is still frozen and the sun and the wind take a toll on the foliage because the roots can't send up moisture. I have seen plants flip from green to brown in a week at that time of year.

Maybe burlap?

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 8:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tom_mn(z4b_MN)

Yes, I am talking about Blue Prince and Princess, also Mikkeli and Minnetonka rhododendrons.

The hollies: for me, the Princess is a winner in zone 4, the Prince barely limps by. I came out of the winter of 2008 with NO leaves at all on the Prince. It was the first (and last) winter I did not wrap them in burlap, since I figured that after 5 years in the ground they could take a zone 4 winter. After the winter of 2009 they were much better, I used both burlap and wiltpruf applied in mid-Nov, and shoveled snow over them so they were under snow all winter. This is despite the winter being awful for winterburn (esp March and into April), unwrapped yews and boxwoods looked terrible. March/April seems to be the only time winterburn happens, but can't apply the wiltpruf in February-- it's too cold.

Because the whole western side of Blue Princess was winterburned in 2009 (not the top or other sides), I am considering lining the burlap on that side with aluminum foil to block the hideous west winter wind.

Mikkeli is perfectly hardy, but only holds leaves two years so is very leggy. I want a more full plant but it is too big to wrap easily (5' tall) in burlap, wiltpruf takes 3 minutes.

Minnetonka is on its first winter.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2009 at 8:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Two test subjects one time is not much of a trial.

    Bookmark   November 22, 2009 at 8:09PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dorothyz6

To bboy: I never suggested that I was doing a scientific trial...I simply shared my experience. With all due respect, postings like yours don't really further the conversation -- and frankly, you seem more interested in being disagreeable and right than helpful.

dorothy

    Bookmark   November 22, 2009 at 11:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

I mention what I believe to be reliable information, so that others will be tipped off and benefit from it - when their minds are open to it. There is nothing useful or helpful about repeating falsehoods. This amounts to giving bad advice.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2009 at 2:37PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
steve1young(7A)

Good for you, Dorothy. Very well put. Know that others support you.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2009 at 5:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Book burnings draw crowds, too.

Go ahead and buy and apply your snake oil folks, it's no skin off my nose!

    Bookmark   November 24, 2009 at 8:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mainegrower(Z5b ME)

I know of too many commercial rhododendron growers in the east who swear by Wilt Pruf to discount its effectiveness. No, this product will not enable you grow any plant not hardy in your horticultural zone. (Careful siting and micro-climates, may, however).

The literature cited in bboy's original post does not say that Wilt Pruf and other anti-dessicants are ineffective against wind damage. Practical experience has demonstrated time and time again that these products do bring broad-leafed evergreens through winter in much better shape than they would have been without it. It may well be that they do this in ways not tested in the study cited by bboy.

In regard to dorothy's second post: there is something about the internet that seems to encourage rudeness and a know-it-all attitude on the part of too many people. This is mercifully absent in most posts on gardenweb. Bboy performed a valuable service in providing a link to the anti-dessicant study. This one study, however, does not negate the experience of growers, botanical gardens, nurseries or individual gardeners. To pretend it does is inaccurate; to do so in bboy's manner is offensive and disrespectful.

    Bookmark   November 25, 2009 at 6:46AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

bboy,
I have followed your posts for years and have to say for the first time I am extremely disappointed in your response to dorothy, particularly There is nothing useful or helpful about repeating falsehoods. This amounts to giving bad advice. and especially the blast from the past, over used GW condescending response Book burnings draw crowds, too I really want to believe is below you.
As I know you are aware but may have temporarily forgotten this form is not strictly for professionals. One of GW's best assets is the regional contributions from homeownerÂs trial and error. I happen to live in a climate of contradictions (zone 7a Massachusetts) and have come to terms through trial and error in my own landscape that anti-desiccants regardless of their inflated cost are a valuable tool in protecting some evergreens.
I wonder if you have ever sat down to consider that comments as abrasive as yours contribute to the overall ever shrinking GW population. Now please don't feel you can run to the patronizing opinion that dorothy and anyone in defense of her is just posting with the overall intention of receiving hugs and kisses, because the only one you would be fooling is yourself.
There are times in all of our lives where we need to/should swallow hard and say out loud those two simple words I am sorry and bboy I think this is your time.

Your GW groupie Katy

    Bookmark   November 25, 2009 at 6:07PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Whereas I'm supposed to embrace

>you seem more interested in being disagreeable and right than helpful>

with open arms and fondness?

Don't need it, get nothing out of it, have already spent too much time and energy on it.

    Bookmark   November 28, 2009 at 2:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
duncanmsu

I did some wilt proof trials while in college and the results were inconclusive. Upon examinination under a microscope it appears that the wilt proof protective layer cracked extensively within a short period of time rendering it useless.

    Bookmark   November 30, 2009 at 9:56AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dorothyz6

Still no scientific trials done on my end....just years of trial and error and conversations with other gardeners. Just to clarify -- contrary to bboy's assertion, I am open minded to differences in opinion and had absolutely no problem with the link posted. What disappointed me (and prompted me to reply the way I did) was the snarky one-liner postings from bboy that followed. I have read these boards for a while and find them extremely informative, but as Katy stated so well, it's those kinds of replies that I would have to believe make people hesitant to post -- thereby not broadening the conversation.

Well enough about that....a happy holiday season to everyone.

Dorothy

    Bookmark   November 30, 2009 at 11:43AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tom_mn(z4b_MN)

I'd forgotten to check back and say what I did. Saturday it was about 40 and I sprayed the four plants with a generic Wiltpruf. I think that it was $3 well spent.

About the zones issue: Realize that a plant may be "hardy" in zone 4, but isn't it preferable to have that plant carry its leaves through the winter than drop them? Not really pushing zones, but that is what I meant.

    Bookmark   November 30, 2009 at 1:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
runktrun(z7a MA)

Bboy,

Simply your post was unintelligible.

Whereas I'm supposed to embrace
>you seem more interested in being disagreeable and right than helpful>
with open arms and fondness?
Don't need it, get nothing out of it, have already spent too much time and energy on it.

Please shoot me an email if you need someone to talk to. Katy

    Bookmark   November 30, 2009 at 5:49PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
woodinvirginia

Apply to my Rhododendrons mid-DECEMBER ON A 45 DEGREE DAY IF I can catch one that is sunny and not windy, spray plants [both sides of leaves] till dripping wet. Have had such good results I even spray the Rhodies at my church at the same time to keep them going in full health through winter.

Normally I buy the gallon concentrate bottle [AMAZON] and mix per the directions with WARM water in an hand held sprayer if only doing 1-2 plants. Can also make mix in gallon sprayer if you have to spray at least 3 plants or more. Make batches with 1//5 concentration for wind protection.

Also I spray the Live Holiday Wreath we get each year on the door and it helps to make that last at least a month without browning.These are exposed to a lot of wind when placed outside. Some people even use this as a foliar spray on their Xmas tree and allowed to dry 4 hours before bring items into the house. YMMV.

    Bookmark   December 23, 2012 at 12:04AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brandon7 TN_zone(7)

It seems to me that Bboy got unjustly targeted for providing good information that some may just not have wanted to accept. What a shame that more information couldn't have been discussed and explained, rather than the messenger being attacked. Anecdotal evidence is great and should always be welcomed, but should seldom be depended upon to trump scientific research.

Below is a link to what I think is a helpful overview of what the research indicates about much of this topic.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Myth of Antitranspirants

    Bookmark   December 23, 2012 at 12:48AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Coppicing Red Twig Dogwood Best Method?
Do you cut all of your red twig dogwood stems down...
jackbe1
Pruning Young Loropetalum
I planted a 5 gallon last summer, and it is starting...
misterleadfoot_z9
Screen behind basketball goal
Hello. We just moved into a new house. I'd like to...
bcurrey
Converting Mature Escallonia Bush to Large In-ground Bonsai Tree Form
I have two Escallonia shrubs that are 20 years old....
misterleadfoot_z9
Transplanting a lilac bush
I need some advice on transplanting a 7 foot tall European...
Ashleylovesgreen
Sponsored Products
Safavieh Indoor/Outdoor Area Rug: Safavieh Rugs Wyndham Silver 8 ft. x 10 ft.
Home Depot
Out on a Limb Table
| Dot & Bo
Emblem Black 14-Inch Outdoor Wall Light
$228.95 | Bellacor
Linden Cool Gray Border Duvet- Queen / Full
Crane and Canopy
Koncept | Equo Gen 3 LED Desk Lamp
$198.00 | YLighting
Flowered Granite Garden Ornament with Light
Signature Hardware
Hooker Beaufort Ladderback Counter Stool - Black - Set of 2 - HOOK2381
$710.00 | Hayneedle
Henri Studio Nebbia Grande Kensington 3-Tier Fountain
Lamps Plus
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™