cheap worm-bag bin

mendopeteMarch 25, 2014

About a year ago I purchased 10 "grow-bags" at the flea market for $1 each. These 12 gallon fabric bags allow air flow to roots when used as a planting pot. I thought they would make nice worm bins to give away.

After soaking in some water, about a pound of squirm and bedrun was added to 4 of these. Three were given away and one was left outside on a block in full shade. The top folds in to keep out unwanted visiters, weighted by a brick.

This bin got occasional fed until July, and the bag was quite active. After that it only got meager additions about once a month. It required very little water.

Last week , the nearly full bag was split into 6 bags. The material was uniformly damp, and worms were scattered throughout, but the top was most active. To my surprise, the bag was still sound with no rot present on the bottom.

This bag is similar in principle to a wormy inn. Lots of air. I often see inn users complain about moisture retention. This bag held moisture VERY well.

I will soon try a sandbag wormery with a couple bags sitting in the garage. I suspect moisture retention will not be as good, but we will see.

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mendopete

Sorry, wrong forum! Does anyone know if a post can be moved to another forum?

    Bookmark   March 25, 2014 at 11:48AM
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