Where to buy Garden Way Cart tires?

catherinet(5 IN)May 21, 2007

Hi all,

I hope this is the right place to ask this.

Our Garden Way Cart is in need of new tires and inner tubes. I can't seem to find them locally. Where do you think I could find these kind of tires? Thanks.

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baymee(LehighValleyPA)

Try Johnny's selected seeds or google it. They can be had.

    Bookmark   May 21, 2007 at 2:46PM
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bas157

What size tires does it have?

    Bookmark   May 21, 2007 at 10:15PM
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bill_kapaun

I'd look in the Yellow pages for places that sell agricultural/trailer tires.
Look on the side of the tire for the size and let your fingers do the walking.

    Bookmark   May 22, 2007 at 1:35AM
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dirtdigging101(7 - NC)

i got mine at walmart in the bike department

    Bookmark   May 22, 2007 at 5:48AM
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baymee(LehighValleyPA)

I'm still using my two carts and the tires are 30 years old and stored outside in the weather. A wallmart tire might last 30 days if you're lucky.

    Bookmark   May 22, 2007 at 7:34AM
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dirtdigging101(7 - NC)

been 5 years now and always outside
go walmart

    Bookmark   May 22, 2007 at 9:59AM
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DrynDusty(z8 AZ)

Any 26 inch mountain bike tire should work. Why not splurge and get one or two from a Bike Shop? New Tubes would be lovely don't you think? Maybe some Slime to keep flats at bay?
Norm

    Bookmark   May 22, 2007 at 11:43PM
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bill_kapaun

I'd just assumed they were more like trailer tires.
If they're just bike tires (looks like 20"), just go to any xmart, krogers etc.
There should be a size listed on the side like 20x2.1 or 20x1.75. Could be also listed metric like 57-406 or 45-406.
As long as the new tire has the 406 part, it'll fit.
My experience with bike tires from these places are although they aren't the very best tires, they are a GOOD buy for the money. Typically $6-10 ea. and a Kevlar belt for thorn resistance. Tubes run about $3-4 ea. Slime filled for about $2 more.

    Bookmark   May 23, 2007 at 6:58AM
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dmullen(Southern CA)

I bought some at WalMart 10 or more years ago and they are still running. While there, I bought an inner tube made of foam or something solid. No more flat tires since then and this cart is used year around.

    Bookmark   May 23, 2007 at 11:06AM
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chesapeakebeach

Any 26" by 2.125" tire should work fine, as should an appropriate tube. You can get them at Kmart or similar stores or at a bike shop.

    Bookmark   April 4, 2010 at 5:22PM
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Ubique(Pac NW)

Go to a BIKE shop and try not to buy tires or tubes made in China, they're crap. After mounting the new tires and tubes use the recommended amount of slime sealer and keep the pressure as per the recommendations on the sidewall of the tire.

    Bookmark   April 6, 2010 at 12:54PM
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Eddie_T

I know this is an old thread but found it in my search for replacement tires. My cart is an old Garden Way 26 with Carlisle 26" x 2.25" Jet Flyte bike tires with tubes. Bike tires in those days were thicker and harder rubber. Today they are foldable and come in a box. I got a bright idea and went to a local bike and outfitter shop asking for "pull-offs" in that size range. Results were two free tires, one a 26" x 2.3" (which I installed" and the other a 26" x 2.1". I didn't readily spot any problems with the tires, it may have been a handling problem that doesn't show up at cart speed.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 11:16AM
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bill_kapaun

"Bike tires in those days were thicker and harder rubber"
????

You can find a vast array or bike tires from thin, supple slicks to gawd awful knobbies that are appropriate for a tractor.
You can even get studded tires.
Click the link to see what's available from just one dealer-

Here is a link that might be useful: Click me

This post was edited by bill_kapaun on Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 14:39

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 2:33PM
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Eddie_T

"Bike tires in those days were thicker and harder rubber"
????

Yes, I wasn't talking about the knob thickness. Maybe a better word would have been stiffer rubber as tires are more pliant now. The Tioga I picked up for free didn't require tools (only thumbs) except for the last 3" or so. It did have deep knobs though the carcass was thin and pliant.

The Tioga looked like new and free sure beat the advertised price. Cyclists tend to have money to spend and may have just wanted the latest and best reviewed tire. Whatever the reason, my gain and no new tires in my future for a garden cart.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2013 at 12:53AM
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bill_kapaun

Check out Schwalbe Marathons. Thick & hard!
I wrench on bikes and ride a couple (70 miles last July 31st on my hybrid)
As I said, tires come in a LOT of different types.
50+ years ago they had hard ones, soft ones.....Just not as many styles as today. Remember gum walls on your "English racers"?

    Bookmark   December 14, 2013 at 9:56AM
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Eddie_T

Were those gum walls the first attempt at a flexible side wall? They were not very ozone or UV friendly. Wards Riversides were common tires in my day and a bear for a kid to put on with spoon handles and screwdrivers as tire tools.

Mountain bikes only came into the picture around 1980. Prior to that fat tire bikes pretty much wore simple tires didn't they? The same plies for sidewall and tread as with the Carlisle which Garden Way chose.

We kind of hi-jacked the thread with trivia. My point is that free pull-offs are a good source for cart tires if your cart uses tubed bicycle tires.

This post was edited by Eddie_T on Mon, Dec 16, 13 at 12:03

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 11:24AM
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bill_kapaun

Well, it was a 6-1/2 year old thread....
Back in the late 50's-early 60's, my tires came out of the Sears & Roebuck catalog or Western Auto.
We had mostly gravel streets, so "cruiser" tires were out. Mostly because kids skid rear wheels and they didn't have a thick enough tread to last before the sharp, pointy gravel started puncturing things.
We usually ended up with some Heavy Duty Sears tires that lasted forever, but must have weighed 4 lbs. ea.
Since we lived at the top of a hill, it was always exhausting to get back home, pushing the bike the last 3 blocks. I gave up the bike when I was about 12 because it was easier to walk.
I got back into riding about 10? years ago.
I started wrenching on them shortly after and started flipping them on Craigslist about 5-6 years ago for a little extra income. When I quit buying $3 worth of tools for every $1 I make.....

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 3:46PM
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baymee(LehighValleyPA)

I had to replace the tires on one of my carts (I have 3) and I could only find a limited selection. The ones I bought were able to be folded up and put into a shot glass. And they look bad after one year.

The carts are built to carry 450# and my other two units still have tires on from 1980. I use them constantly for wood, all year long.

I'll have to keep this thread in case I need some more.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 7:03PM
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bill_kapaun

There are high quality folding tires and "lesser" quality such as found in the box stores. Ditto with wire bead tires.
You get the tire that's appropriate for your needs.
I use folders on my hybrid (622-26mm) & wire on my "grocery getter" converted mountain bike. (26x1.25" tires)
The folding tires weigh a bit under 8oz. each. It makes the bike much easier to accelerate, than using a much heavier, flat resistant tire. IF I was riding that bike in an area with goat head thorns or lots of broken glass, my tire choice would be different.
If I was getting tires for a yard cart, my choice would probably be different again.

Somebody must use some humongous sized shot glasses.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 7:32PM
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