Spring planting help, is EAB near you?

toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)January 30, 2014

This is the newest map I have seen.

I love Fraxinus family ash trees and am even applying preventative treatment to two of mine, but I sure am not planting any more.

Just looking to make some folks aware of the lifetime of "maybe it will work" treatment they are signing themselves up for if they plant an ash anywhere near an infection zone. It amazes me that nurseries still sell these.

Stay warm.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://extension.missouri.edu/emeraldashborer/kansascity.aspx

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saccharum(z9 FL)

That's actually a little out of date already - last year it was found in the Atlanta, GA area and in Boulder, CO.

Here is a link that might be useful: Emerald Ash Borer US Distribution (PDF)

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 4:40PM
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olreader

yes I think here in Boulder/Denver area we have as high a percentage of ash plantings in residental areas as anywhere in the country. Time to start my lifetime of maybe it will work treatments for my one ash tree I guess

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 4:56PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Sad to see.

OH pretty much has no ash trees left alive in many areas. Here in MD damage is spotty if visible at all.

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 5:21PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Its crazy how much its spread in NY

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 6:01PM
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alabamatreehugger(8)

I have 5 Green Ash and 3 White Ash that I planted several years ago. I live near the FL panhandle and Ash trees only occur near rivers here, so I really never even see any besides mine. Only time will tell if my trees are isolated enough.

If EAB gets this far south I do believe it will be because they have followed the rivers. Pumpkin Ash may get hit harder here than other types, since it seems to be more abundant in swamps.

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 8:15PM
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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

The cold up north may help kill at least some of the larvae there. From a Minnesota study:

"From our simple model that related the coldest temperature experienced by emerald ash borer larvae to the extent of mortality, we predicted that when larvae reach -17.8ðC (0ðF), 5% will die; at -23ðC (-10ðF), 34% will die; at -29ðC (-20ðF), 79% will die; and at -34ðC (-30ðF), 98% will die."

Problem is, it needs to get that cold inside the tree and the trees warm up in sunlight above the ambient temps.

tj

Here is a link that might be useful: The whole article

    Bookmark   January 30, 2014 at 10:46PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

I love Fraxinus family ash trees and am even applying preventative treatment to two of mine,

===>>> does DeNile river run thru your area ...

be done with them ... who cares what you love .. its not like you cant find some other trees to love ...

crikey man .... free your love ...

ken

ps: yeah.. i treated mine.. when it cost 5 to 10 bucks per tree ... systemic drench .. then the damn weed trees got on 8 to 12 inches thick.. and 20 feet tall .. or whatever.. and it became clear it was going to start costing 50 bucks a tree... and the trees just happened to be at that point in their lives.. where i either cut them down for free ... or the following season had to pay MORE MONEY to have them professionally taken down ... i lost my love for the ash ... as i fired up the chainsaw.. and ran around the yard yelling.. TIMBER!!! .... they burned just fine.. and i think i heard these small little voices screaming about the inhumanity ... lol .. GET RID OF THEM ...

    Bookmark   January 31, 2014 at 8:11AM
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arbordave (SE MI)

For those who don't want to "throw in the towel" on Fraxinus ... why not plant one of the resistant species? Manchurian ash is known to be resistant, and it is likely that other Asian species will prove to be. Research has begun on developing resistant hybrids of Asian and North American species. Also, the native blue ash has apparently been able to persist in certain areas here in Michigan.

    Bookmark   February 1, 2014 at 10:39AM
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