Perennial Vegetables

dee2000_tx7(DFW 7b)May 12, 2006

Can anyone tell me what are the only perennial vegetables?

I understand there are only 2. All others have to be replanted every year.

Thanks

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barefootinct(6a)

Asparagus is one.
Patty

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 2:00PM
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dee2000_tx7(DFW 7b)

Oh thank you! Would onions be one?

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 2:30PM
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barefootinct(6a)

Nope, not onions. Rhubarb is perennial, but is it a vegetable, a fruit, a wierd stem that somehow tastes good with berries?

Patty

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 2:48PM
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janetr(Ottawa USDA 4a)

Radicchio is another. Jerusalem artichokes yet another. Now we're up to three... ;o)

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 3:20PM
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saypoint(6b CT)

Horseradish.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 5:53PM
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oldroser(z5)

Egyptian onion, bunching onions, garlic.......

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 6:23PM
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chills71(Zone 6b Mi)

Not in my climate, but I have heard that Artichokes are another.

~Chills

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 7:32PM
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triciae(Zone 7 Coastal SE CT)

Sweet potatoes/yams are perennial..but, alas not for me!

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 7:37PM
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dee2000_tx7(DFW 7b)

Oh my goodness! Thank you. I had no idea there were this many.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2006 at 8:46PM
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lindac(Iowa Z 5/4)

Radicchio a perennial???
Linda C

    Bookmark   May 13, 2006 at 12:38AM
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janetr(Ottawa USDA 4a)

Yes, radicchio is a perennial if it's not dug up for the blanching process. My Italian FIL has a corner in his vast vegetable garden reserved for them. They aren't as pretty with the green pigmentation mixed in, but I don't think he cares...

    Bookmark   May 13, 2006 at 1:23AM
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roseyt(z8 TX)

I just started researching perennial vegetables and came across this.

Here is a link that might be useful: Perennial Foods

    Bookmark   June 18, 2006 at 11:22AM
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jenny_in_se_pa(USDA7 Sunset 32)

Peppers are perennial, becoming good-sized shrubs over time. But you would need to be in a zone where they survive winter.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2006 at 1:19PM
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lindac(Iowa Z 5/4)

In my world, radicchio is a salad vegetable, grown like head lettuce or a cabbage. I suppose that if you don't pull the whole plant when harvesting but just cut the head, the stem will create another head, as will romaine lettuce...but it's really not a plant that you leave to produce another crop the following year.
And sweet potatoes ( or even regular potatoes) may be "perennial" in that if you don't dig them and they don't freeze they would continue to grow.
By that thinking winter onions, carrots, parsnips are perennials....unless you don't eat them.
The OP asked which don't need to be planted every year.....and so far we have artichokes and asparagus.
Is there any place in the world where peppers are grown as a perennial and picked from the shrub?
But I guess that peppers are really a fruit, in that the seed is contained in the edible part.
Linda C

    Bookmark   June 18, 2006 at 3:44PM
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donn_(7b-8a)

Radicchio (Cichorium intybus) is most certainly a perennial vegetable, hardy to zone 3 and not at all frost tender. While I grow some for heads, I also grow some which are not allowed to go to heads. I harvest 2-3" leaves all season, which is well past first frost and into early winter, and have a few plants that are 5 years old and still producing nicely. I find the winter leaves to be tastier and much less bitter than during warmer seasons.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2006 at 4:07PM
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janetr(Ottawa USDA 4a)

And I will repeat Jerusalem artichokes, which despite the name, are totally unrelated to artichokes. They produce tubers and can apparently, even be quite invasive. Nice flowers too, although by the time you get to Zone 3 or 4, getting flowers is iffy, although they'll grow and spread anyway.

And my FIL does indeed use his radicchio as a salad vegetable and he does indeed leave it to produce another crop the following year. I keep getting sent home with bags of it.

Janet's Garden

    Bookmark   June 20, 2006 at 8:45AM
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jenny_in_se_pa(USDA7 Sunset 32)

Many capsicum species (the most common that we consume are C. annum and C. frutescens) are hardy from Zone 9 - 11, which last time I checked, includes much of the deep south and Hawaii. There is a pepper industry in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.

The technicality here is what one defines as a "vegetable" - ie., whether you go by the definition of it being some part of the plant that is consumed as part of a meal and not as a dessert. Technically, all plants can eventually form a "fruit" (via flowering), which is part of a normal reproductive cycle beyond any natural colonization that the plant might be able to carry out, etc.

Here is a link that might be useful: Some perennial vegetables

    Bookmark   June 22, 2006 at 1:48PM
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jennie(8 WA)

Cardoon, at least here; I don't know how hardy it is. I vote to keep rhubarb on the list, stems are vegetables even if you eat them as sweets.

Daylilies are edible too.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 12:47AM
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cloud_9(z5 CT)

Sorrel is perennial.

I have a feeling that dee2000 was looking for the answer to a quiz "for people that know everything" that erroneously states that "Of all vegetables, only two can live to produce on their own for several growing seasons. All other vegetables must be replanted every year. What are the only two perennial vegetables?". If you get the email quiz with the answers, it states that they are asparagus and rhubarb. Guess the quiz-masters didnÂt know everything, huh?

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 10:05AM
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jennie(8 WA)

Bamboo shoots are another vegetable that you don't have to replant every year, though I don't know that it's really a perennial.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 11:45AM
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paulacat(Z8 Coastal SC)

As others have said, peppers definitely can be perennials. In fact, I've read that they will live 5 years or longer. My husband had a tabasco pepper in a pot, moved it into the greenhouse during the coldest of weather and it lived for several years, producing bountiful crops.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 4:17PM
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jenny_in_se_pa(USDA7 Sunset 32)

My 3 habanero pepper plants are 4 years old this year!

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 11:07PM
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miller2440(z7AL)

I planted artichokes 5 years ago, and they come back every year. They spread but not invasively. They make a beautiful plant, and we've gotten about a dozen large delicious artichokes from them this year.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2006 at 11:36PM
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Marie of Roumania(z6 MA)

leeks are a perennial vegetable.

i'm letting some blue solaise go to seed because they're beautiful -- left 6 of them in over the winter & they've shot flower stalks 6' high & ready to pop.

if i can get some of this seed to germinate, i'm going to plant seedlings in with the delphiniums next year & let 'em go to town.

    Bookmark   June 24, 2006 at 8:56PM
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whinberry

hello all, I just joined.
I am interested in perennial vegetables also because of the saving of work in the garden. No one has mentioned Sea Kale which grows over here in the UK. I tried raising some plants but it takes a few years to get established. If you can raise the plants you have the leaf as a vegetable but also after a while the root is very good too.
There are a couple of other plants such as Samphire, Asparagus and certain wild roots. I am doing my own research and if anyone has any other information I would be glad to hear it.
God bless! Whinberry

    Bookmark   January 10, 2007 at 5:04PM
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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

Fiddleheads (ostrich fern)
Watercress

    Bookmark   January 15, 2007 at 10:31AM
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nzanderl

there are millons of Perennial Vegetables and Eric Toensmeier wrote a couple hundred pages on them.

chayote, new zealand spinach, cardoon and sweet potato are a few he mentions. i would be happy to answer any questions about sources etc.

    Bookmark   January 13, 2009 at 9:24PM
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lnm03

Perennial Vegetables and Greens

Arrowhead, Sagittaria sagittifolia
Arugula, rocket, Diplotaxis erucoides
Asparagus, Asparagus officinalis
Chicory, Cichorium sp.
Comfrey, Symphytum sp.
Earth Pea, Lathyrus tuberosa
Elephant Garlic, Allium ampeloprasum
Galangal, Thai ginger, Alpinia galangal
Garlic, Allium sativum
Ginger, Zingiber officinale
Globe artichoke, Cynara scolymus
Golden shallots, Allium cepa var. aggregatum
Ground nut, Agrios americana
Horseradish, Amoracia sp.
Jerusalem artichokes, sunchoke, Helianthus tuberosus
New Zealand Spinach, Tetragonia
Oca, New Zealand yam, Oxalis tuberosa
Peruvian parsnip, Arracacia xanthorrhiza
Rhubarb, Rhuem rhabarbarum
Sea beet, Beta vulgaris ssp.maritima
Sea kale, Crambe maritima
Sorrel, Rumex acetosa
Sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas
Taro, Colocasia esculenta
Turmeric, Indian saffron, Curcuma domestica
Waterchestnuts, Eleocharis dulcis
Welsh onion, Allium sp.
Yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius
Yam, Dioscorea batat

    Bookmark   January 19, 2009 at 10:01PM
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hemnancy(z8 PNW)

My elephant garlic comes up every year and blooms, whereas my ornamental alliums mostly died after a season or two.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2009 at 2:20AM
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chills71(Zone 6b Mi)

My Brussel Sprouts survived the winter and look pretty good already.

We'll see if the "sprouts" are good sometime in June or sooner!

~Chills

    Bookmark   March 24, 2010 at 9:29PM
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deborah_speakeasy_net

Swiss chard, if you grow as "cut-and-come again," I've been mooching the leaves of my plants for about 18 months. Also strawberries. http://garden.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Perennial_Foods

    Bookmark   March 31, 2010 at 1:08AM
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