California Redwood Cuttings

Edymnion(7a)February 23, 2012

Got a question that probably cannot be definitively answered right now, but hopefully someone will know enough about related species to be able to answer it.

I have three rooted cuttings of california redwood trees potted up right now that are doing well. New growth, all that stuff.

My question is, will these cuttings actually grow into a full sized redwood, given proper time and conditions? Granted, it will take a couple hundred years for them to reach full size, so I doubt anyone has actually done it, but what about with faster growing species? If you rooted a pine branch, would it grow into a full sized pine, or would it stay stunted it's entire life?

I guess my basic question is "Should I keep babying these cuttings, or is it just not worth it?"

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taxo_man

The cuttings you took will eventually grow into a clone of the parent tree you took the cuttings from.
So, yes, these will grow to a full sized redwood given the proper time.
Same thing with the pine branch.
Yes, you should keep the cuttings. They will start to look more like a tree, (rather than just a branch) in a few years..
J

    Bookmark   February 23, 2012 at 2:51PM
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Edymnion(7a)

Excellent, thank you. I figured they would, but with my luck I would tend the things for a few years and then find out "Oh yeah, redwood branches are determinate. Hope you enjoy your bonsai."

So yeah, when your grandkids hear about the monster trees in Tennessee, you know where they came from. =D

    Bookmark   February 23, 2012 at 8:01PM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

Pines are propagated by seeds or by grafting. Rooting a Pine branch is almost impossible.
What type of Redwood do you have? Does the foliage have needles, or does it look like a Juniper?
If it has needles it's a Coast Redwood, Sequoia sempervirens, and is easy to root. If the cuttings were taken from a branch, they will grow as a branch for a long time and will need staking for several years.
Sequoiadendendron gigantea, the Juniper foliage one, is more difficult to root and I doubt you have that one if started by cuttings.
Yes, cuttings will grow to full size,....eventually.
Mike

    Bookmark   February 24, 2012 at 12:20PM
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ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

hi

very few conifers... [there is a forum for such.. but conifers are trees] ... anyway ... very few conifers and trees.. will root from cuttings..

redwood is one of the exceptions ...

pine will not ...

taxo said: The cuttings you took will eventually grow into a clone

==>> and that means it is .. and i will yell ... THE SAME TREE ... not something new.. not a new unknown tree.. an absolute copy of what you cut from .... in other words.. the DNA is exactly the same ... even with species seed.. you might not get exact duplication ...

so.. its potential is exactly what you took the cutting from ...

we need more facts.. if you want to know when to plant them in mother earth.. cuz its going to be real hard to find a pot for a 350 foot redwood.. lol ...

more info about:

when seed planted
how big now.
full ID
soil in garden.. etc ...

there is a pic floating around the web where some nut planted one 5 feet from his house.. and the state took the house for the tree ...

we can ID it here or in the conifer forum.. with a pic of the whole.. the leaves/needles.. and the bark .... well actually .. they can.. i cant.. lol ..

ken

    Bookmark   February 24, 2012 at 1:39PM
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j0nd03

"there is a pic floating around the web where some nut planted one 5 feet from his house.. and the state took the house for the tree ... "

Hoo boy, I need a link to see this...

As to your question, it has been answered and covered pretty well already. Enjoy your clones :)

John

    Bookmark   February 24, 2012 at 2:27PM
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yugoslava

We need trees that will live for a long time. Can't grow a redwood, too far north. I live in the city and always have to keep in mind the mature size of the tree. I have two 60 plus years old black ash trees. They are not doing so well and 8 years ago I planted a Kentucky Coffee tree. It's growing well. It has a beautiful straight trunk and in August of last year a windstorm broke one of the branches. I was rejoicing at the lovely crown it was developing. Now, the broken branches have changed the appearance. Despite that, I love trees and I'm thinking when I'm no longer alive to enjoy them I will ask my sons to plant metasequoia (right spelling?) instead of any other crap. I'd rather have birds do it.

    Bookmark   February 26, 2012 at 11:50AM
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Edymnion(7a)

For the record, I did not make the cuttings, I bought them from a nursery already rooted.

They're Sequoia Sempervirens, and they're probably about 15 inches tall right now. There are three of them, each staked in their own gallon containers. Got them late last year, so they've been chilling out under grow lights all winter indoors.

They're getting acclimated to the outdoors now, and I'll be up-potting them into bigger containers by late spring or early summer. I plan on keeping them in containers until they're at least a couple feet tall, then I'll transplant them out into my woods (I've got about 20 acres out here).

    Bookmark   February 26, 2012 at 10:02PM
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