ammonium sulfate lower soil ph

bkg73May 14, 2008

Hello,

My soil PH (kaleechee and clay)is apprx 8.

I just planted zoysia plugs and want to give them the best chance possible. I read that zoysia likes 6-7 ph level. I would like to get my soil ph to 6.5. From what I read ammonium sulfate is the quickest way. I need to know how much ammonium sulfate to add per square foot and the method of application. It seems to be that sprinkling the granuals on the soil and watering them in is the best way.

Additionally, if anyone has a better suggestion please tell.

But also please address my request for how much ammonium sulfate is required for a 1.5 ph drop.

Thank You!!!!

Brandon

Austin, Texas

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bpgreen(5UT)

"My soil PH (kaleechee and clay)is apprx 8.
. . .
I would like to get my soil ph to 6.5."

Good luck.

I don't think you can accomplish that with ammonium sulfate. First of all, ammonium sulfate doesn't affect soil pH much. And the effect is temporary. The amount of ammonium sulfate you'd need would supply enough nitrogen that it would kill everything around.

It's very difficult to significantly lower pH on a large scale (like a lawn). Adding lots of organic matter will lower the pH some and also buffer it. But trying to lower the pH of a lawn by 1.5 is probably something that can only be accomplished with a wand, so we Muggles are out of luck.

Is there any way you can plant a grass that is adapted to your soil?

    Bookmark   May 14, 2008 at 1:40AM
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bkg73

The most popular grasses around here are Burmuda and St. Augustine. We hate both of those. Zoysia supposedly grows well any many different soils so it will probably do fine
with a 7.5-8 ph , but I just wanted to make it the best I could to give it the best possible chance of getting establised. Also, to speed up the growth rate.

Would Iron or elemental sulfur be a better solution?
By the way I will be fertilizing with Nutri20 every 2 weeks until the zoysia gets established so I wouldn't think nutrients would be a problem. Since I will be fertilizing so much should I just forget about the ph level for now?

Thanks!!!!

    Bookmark   May 14, 2008 at 12:06PM
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Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

Ammonium Sulfate is a synthetic fertilzier used most often to lower a soils pH as well as supply Nitrogen. It is made by reacting ammonia (a Nitrogen source) with sulfuric acid and in soils the Sulfuric Acid will help lower a soils pH. The best place to find out just how much is needed is your local office of the Texas A & M USDA Cooperative Extension Service.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2008 at 12:57PM
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dchall_san_antonio(8 San Antonio)

I am growing zoysia just fine in San Antonio's limestone soil, pH = 8. Iron doesn't do anything in our soil except immediately bind itself to the calcium.

Growing adapted plants is one of the key tenants of gardening. Since you live on limestone soil and use water from a limestone aquifer, nothing you can do will permanently change the pH. You can temporarily change the first inch or so but you must understand that the first rainstorm will wash that acidity away and you will have limestone soil again.

    Bookmark   May 16, 2008 at 10:00AM
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pmichel4_optimum_net

I am planning to plant blueberries in my garden, in one corner
The present PH of the soil is 6.8, ineed to lower it to 4.5-5.0 I need to know how amonium sulfate to add per square foot in order to get the PH I need to plant the blueberries in.
I am also adding sand for aeration and sulfur.

Please advise as it is now February and I plan to plant this season.
Thank You in Advance

P.Michel

    Bookmark   February 20, 2011 at 9:06AM
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will335

I live in south Texas and we have a high soil PH. I would strongly recommend planting blueberries in a planter using a mixture of mostly peat moss and sand. It would be very hard to lower your soils PH that much.Don't forget to get netting, birds will scavenge your berries before they are ripe. Good luck!

    Bookmark   October 24, 2011 at 1:27PM
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