Will Beetles/Boers/Etc Attack fresh cut Pecan wood

loger_gwDecember 24, 2013

Will Beetles/Borers/Etc Attack fresh cut Pecan wood as I know they will Mesquite wood? In the past I have noticed fresh cut Mesquite would end up with Grub Looking Borers after it is cut (vs before and leaving mounds of dust). My past Pecan held 2-3 seasons with good weight and no sign of borers.

As IâÂÂm rotating to older wood to burn and noticing same Pecan is being attacked and seasoning/aging faster. It appears as all round wood vs split blocks. Could breathing from stacking too tight contribute due to the moisture/mildew appearance (plus bore appearances in attachments)?

I am on my predicted two cords pace or over due to burning older than seasoned wood. Loosing more value in the two cords I planed to save will cause this to continue. My body is not too happy with this loss. A new goal will be to split all wood smaller. Such as: quarter 12â dia wood and no round wood over approx 6â in dia. My Body Is Talking/Rehabbing from too much overhead lifting of wood too large. Pics at the links below if they do not open but IâÂÂll attach one as a summary.

This post was edited by loger on Wed, Dec 25, 13 at 11:26

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loger_gw

Text w/o attachments hopefully w/o graphics over text:

Will Beetles/Borers/Etc Attack fresh cut Pecan wood as I know they will Mesquite wood? In the past I have noticed fresh cut Mesquite would end up with Grub Looking Borers after it is cut (vs before and leaving mounds of dust). My past Pecan held 2-3 seasons with good weight and no sign of borers.

As IâÂÂm rotating to older wood to burn and noticing same Pecan is being attacked and seasoning/aging faster. It appears as all round wood vs split blocks. Could breathing from stacking too tight contribute due to the moisture/mildew appearance (plus borer appearances in attachments)?

I am on my predicted two cords pace or over due to burning older than seasoned wood. Loosing more value in the two cords I planed to save will cause this to continue. My body is not too happy with this loss. A new goal will be to split all wood smaller. Such as: quarter 12â dia wood and no round wood over approx 6â in dia. My Body Is Talking/Rehabbing from too much overhead lifting of wood too large.

    Bookmark   December 25, 2013 at 1:15PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
TXSkeeter

All cut wood will eventually be attacked by borers and small buggy critters if left long enough although my personal opinion is that mesquite will hold out longer than most due to the high natural volatiles contained in the species.
From the wording in your post and the attached image, I get the feeling that you tend to stack wood as you obtain and cut it, putting all on the same stack regardless of age. The best way I've found is to start a separate stack for "new" (this year's cutting) wood, leaving the old or last year's wood stack to burn first. That older wood is burned first regardless of appearance or condition which will remediate some of the borer issues you're having.
As to stacking loose or tight, regardless of how you stack it, there will nearly always be enough airflow to allow the wood to season properly although possibly not enough airflow for the wood surfaces to dry out quickly after a rain, snow event, etc. Unless you keep your wood piles covered, this is a natural occurrence and doesn't actually mean much other than visual appearance.
I think at some point, all of us who cut or have cut our own firewood have actually cut far more than we can use within a reasonable time. While "too much wood" may seem contrary to the idea of having plenty of wood on hand for winter burning or perhaps even just bar-b-queuing, accumulating more than you can use in perhaps one and a half seasons is a waste of effort since once dried, you're just providing a home for borers, termites, and other small nasties who take advantage of the wood buffet you've set up for them.
My recommendation to you would be to burn up all the older wood you already have before you start on the fresher stock you've accumulated. Secondly, try to estimate how much wood you burn a season and then accumulate only as much as you can get rid of easily.
Steve

    Bookmark   December 31, 2013 at 4:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loger_gw

Thanks Steve! I understand and agree with all you are suggesting or saying. My source of wood is my problem since I depend on what I can find free for the removal vs having a source. Before the recent old neighborhood tree removal trend and 2010 ice storm (since 1983âÂÂs storm surplus) I was almost bare and started donating some racks vs purchasing wood when we have gas.

Then come age's challenging splitting/working until I was given a splitter. My confining, 120â X 70â lot + home challenge separating loads of wood but I know the need. My challenges were good source of exercise that IâÂÂll have to evaluate and reduce.

    Bookmark   December 31, 2013 at 11:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ewalk

Loger , Happy New year Bro ! I agree 100% with Steves advice. As for your Moisture and moss or fungus issues I have a suggestion. I have found over 40 yrs of fire would cutting / splitting and storing that the 12 inch thru 16 inch logs are the best in the long haul . As you I quarter my 16 to 18 inch long butts , but suggest you stagger the stacking face to face and bark to face and bark to bark to ensure better air circulation . I also place the last top row with bark up for water and snow protection . Usually stack my face cords double row . I like to separately stack dirty old knotty 20 inch or larger unsplit butt ends for the garage and utility shed and smaller knotty 16 to 18 inch for the house use. As for selection of mesquite wood you have the best overall wood available in the world other than perhaps Iron Wood for efficient burning. I have Maple and Oak and on occasion , when I travel deep into my back acreage by the Red Ceder Swamps I will fell a few Ironwood with 12 to 14 inch sizing . These species due not grow to the 20 inch range as they mature very slowly , but what a dense &hot burning tree. I wish they grew in more abundance however the ceder seem to rule more abundant within this area lol. I have finished my annually cutting with my New Dolmar and Echo saws and split the remanents of the ironwood just prior to Xmas. So I will have plenty of wood for the next 2 yrs . I season for 2 yrs and normally ensure that I begin early in the fall each yr prior to Bow Deer Season . The Cedar I do last for kindling usage in the late fall early winter since the swamps have firmed up by then. I agree as we get older the 8=10 cord wood processing get a little more challenging , but with the price of Heating Oil I have an incentive , since I have plenty of wood resources on my property and selective harvest passionately. All the Best to You and yours during this festive season !

    Bookmark   January 1, 2014 at 10:12AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loger_gw

Hello, Ewalk, Happy New Year!
I have noticed since my mid- late 70s of working and burning wood some of the suggestions mentioned. Most noticeable has been the larger/wood has basically no insect issues and hold a few seasons while round or split. Basically I season 1 yr in this North TX Heat.

I will avoid any dead trees with any signs of insectâÂÂs damage or period when healthy green wood is plentiful. IâÂÂll start splitting my wood smaller Per My BodyâÂÂs Request (LOL). Due to the extra handling I plan to stay with 12â dia or 16-18â with help (splitting 4-6 times and 16â long.

Due to not knowing when I will see a load of wood, I will make most small loads or some close loads in my SUV in a truckâÂÂs bed shell. Next, I use my utility trailer with truck quality axle and springs. Attached is a load of Red Oak that a tree trimmer loaded that was more than I w/h loaded. I feel that was possible too heavy for 2 slow miles home. What is your opinion? I have not loaded that heavy since vs þ full about 400 yards from my yard. My usual load is below the rear windowâÂÂs tops (for traction and seeing back left/right) in the 07 v6 2WD SR5 4Runner and 2-3â high in my 4âÂÂX7â utility trailer (calling it 1/2-3/4 face cord, staying off the Fwy to drive slow).

Red Oak =

Trailer =

Pecan =

    Bookmark   January 1, 2014 at 6:40PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loger_gw

The above message w/o the graphics due to not being able to control the textâÂÂs border into the adds graphics. What am I doing wrong or is the software not compatible?

Hello, Ewalk, Happy New Year!
I have noticed since my mid- late 70s of working and burning wood some of the suggestions mentioned. Most noticeable has been the larger/wood has basically no insect issues and hold a few seasons while round or split. Basically I season 1 yr in this North TX Heat.

I will avoid any dead trees with any signs of insectâÂÂs damage or period when healthy green wood is plentiful. IâÂÂll start splitting my wood smaller Per My BodyâÂÂs Request (LOL). Due to the extra handling I plan to stay with 12â dia or 16-18â with help (splitting 4-6 times and 16â long.

Due to not knowing when I will see a load of wood, I will make most small loads or some close loads in my SUV in a truckâÂÂs bed shell. Next, I use my utility trailer with truck quality axle and springs. Attached is a load of Red Oak that a tree trimmer loaded that was more than I w/h loaded. I feel that was possible too heavy for 2 slow miles home. What is your opinion? I have not loaded that heavy since vs þ full about 400 yards from my yard. My usual load is below the rear windowâÂÂs tops (for traction and seeing back left/right) in the 07 v6 2WD SR5 4Runner and 2-3â high in my 4âÂÂX7â utility trailer (calling it 1/2-3/4 face cord, staying off the Fwy to drive slow).

    Bookmark   January 1, 2014 at 6:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ewalk

Loger can't help you with the graphics issues lol . As for the 4-Runner owned a 1991 , the most weight I ever put in it was 16 4x8 dry wall sheets and the front end was floating lol. Great vehicle had the V-6 had it for 5 yrs , great fuel economy. Your probably right with your heat and the insect issues. The Extreme cold up North here reduces this infestation issue , since they are killed off or at least reduced. Air circulation is the big help in reducing the fugus and mould etc. I wish we had Mesquite firewood available up North , anyhow you take care Bro All the Best !

    Bookmark   January 2, 2014 at 5:25PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Are you finding Insert Pic Attachments to work as printed on this Site
Are you finding Insert Pic Attachments to work as printed...
loger_gw
cultivator or tiller or both
In the past I've manually tilled and cultivated my...
Bushwhacker Blood
Mantis Tiller purge bulb
I cannot get gasoline to come into the purge bulb....
Alice40
What locked my Neighbor’s 6.5 Briggs Quantum Edge Engine?
I wanted to see what locked my Neighbor’s 6.5 Briggs...
loger_gw
Harbor Freight small utility tralier question
I just purchased this harbor freight trailer. http://www.harborfreight.com/1090-lb-capacity-40-1-2-half-inch-x-48-inch-mini-utility-trailer-with-12-inch-four-lug-wheels-and-tires-90153.html I...
rlmunsey
Sponsored Products
Two-stage Under-counter Water Filter
Overstock.com
Mini Star Chrome Six-Light Bath Fixture with Royal Cut Rosaline Pink and Clear C
$900.00 | Bellacor
Currey and Company Renaissance Table Lamp
Lamps Plus
Armen Living Igloo Counter Stool - LCIGBAVIBR26
$249.30 | Hayneedle
Fitzgerald Bench - Key Largo Grass Green
Joybird Furniture
'Teach, Inspire, Grow' Personalized Pen Holder
$21.99 | zulily
Peer Chaise Outdoor Patio Set of 2 in Brown Peridot
$558.00 | LexMod
Area Rug: Painted Desert Butter Pecan 8' x 11'
Home Depot
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™