Tree rec's for building new house

jayhawkfan56May 16, 2013

Hey all,
I am currently building a house in eastern Kansas (Overland Park, suburb of Kansas City). Going to be on a moderate sized lot ~.3 acres or so. So, looking for any shade tree recommendations you all have. Soil is very clay and climate out here in KS isn't exactly perfect (100's in the summer and brutal winters). I'd say rainfall average is in low to mid 30". I don't have soil specifics, but sent a sample off to KSU to get some numbers and quality, will be getting those results in 2-3 weeks. The spot in the yard where the trees will be going will have full sun and be facing south.
Currently looking at sugar maple, red maple, black tupelo, and linden trees, am open to any other suggestions by the experts though!
Any input would be greatly appreciated
Dave

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greenthumbzdude

you can never go wrong with an oak...bur oak would be the best in your area

    Bookmark   May 16, 2013 at 1:25PM
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toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)

I like some of your choices. Sugar maple, I think they are ok in K.C., you can just grab any ol one. Red maple is pretty variable so grab a named cultivar. Nyssa sylvatica is neat as can be. Main species is probably the way to go. I do not know any cultivars I would wish to expose to harser winters than mine.

Um....red maple and nyssa (tupelo, sorry) can tolerate damp spots. Sugar maple prefers no swampy soils and does not like road salt.

Planted alone the red maple cultivars generally look great. If everyone on your street has one the identicalness of the clones just bothers me for some reason lol, but that is a personal thing.

My vote is for A sugar maple and a tupelo lol with a slight preference to the sugar maple as it is an easier transplant.

Oh, and with the tupelo, everyone I meet has a different name for them. The scientific name of what I am referring to is Nyssa sylvatica.

Good luck with that new construction compacted soil!

Here is a link that might be useful: nyssa and other tree info.

    Bookmark   May 16, 2013 at 1:33PM
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scotjute

Bur Oak would be a great choice. They have potential to get big, so do not plant to close to house.
Eastern Red Cedar (medium) would be dependable choice, however there are probably some nicer conifer choices others can recommend.
Red Bud - small tree, possibly Ok. variety. Drought resistant.

    Bookmark   May 16, 2013 at 3:33PM
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jayhawkfan56

Thanks for the follow ups folks. Sounds like everybody is pretty high on oaks. I'm looking specifically at a shingle oak, any experiences with that tree? Do people find falling acorns to be an issue?
Thanks
Dave

    Bookmark   May 17, 2013 at 8:32AM
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lucky_p

You'd be OK with Shingle oak, especially if its of local provenance.
My own preference would be, like others, the bur oak - but if shingle is what you want...

Here is a link that might be useful: Native range for Q.imbricaria

    Bookmark   May 17, 2013 at 1:27PM
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toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)

Jayhawk, I have a large Shingle oak. It is a nice tree. A bit huge for some lots. Bur does the same thing here. Shingle has I suppose slightly smaller than average acorns. Bur has huge ones.

Here the Bur oak seems to grow into a huge round upside down bowl of a tree. Shingle more upright. My neighbor has a bur oak, I love it.

I might have a slight preference for the Bur, maybe because the grass is always greener lol. If I had to park under the falling acorns shingle would be the choice lol.

Do white or scarlet oak do well in your area?

    Bookmark   May 17, 2013 at 5:40PM
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lannegreene(5b)

Hi, I'm in your area. We purchased an older home where the mature trees had been removed. I've planted a red oak, red bud, swamp white oak and purple ash. All but the ash are doing well. The ash broke and died due to emerald ash borer. Note the oaks get large. Contrary to what you may hear the oaks grow quickly. The red oak was purchased at about 4' tall (potted), 7 years later it is 25' tall an about half as wide. The white oak purchased at the same size is about twice as all 2 years later. I do water my trees as needed for the first three years. Our neighbor has a large fine maple, but it has shallow roots and seeds everywhere. I recommend planting a variety of species as insurance against bug and disease issues. Personally I am looking at adding a Kentucky coffee tree to our yard. Do consider native or almost native trees, they are easy care. We have many fine nurseries in the area (Family Tree and Soil Service are my favorites), speak with them about your needs and proper tree care.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2013 at 10:10AM
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toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)

Lannegreene, are you in Kansas with EAB or up north?

    Bookmark   May 18, 2013 at 7:47PM
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fmart322(Z6SNJ)

How about a purple or copper beech tree. You hardly ever see any, when you do they are very nice looking ans stately.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2013 at 1:40PM
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