Help with English Daisy

gardenluv(8)January 28, 2010

Okay, I am sooooo confused! The package of English Daisy Double Mixed Colors from Ferry Morse says perennial. I looked it up on line and have found info saying it is an annual, a biennial, a perennial, blooms first year, won't survive a winter, only hardy in z8-10 etc. etc. Does anyone have any experience with these? I am in zone 5 and would love to have these in my garden. Any info would be helpful.

Thanks!

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siichan(6)

I think Ferry Morse kind of categorized biennials into perennials. For example, they list hollyhock as perennials. This year, I got (and also ws'ed) English daisy seeds received from a trade. The lady I received it from said that it's biennial/annual. But I would also love to hear others' experience with this flower.

    Bookmark   January 28, 2010 at 9:24PM
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shinyalloy_5(5b IN)

I wintersowed some english daisies 'habenera red tips' last feb. and they were listed as both biennial and perennial depending which source I checked. Only one bloomed at all this first summer. At least they're supposed to be hardy to zone 5. I'm definitely looking forward to more blooms this summer, would be nice if they are indeed perennial but I'll collect seed just in case. Wish I could give you a straight forward answer, but I'm just as confused when it comes to these tiny gems.

MARY

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 6:05AM
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shemeows(6 ID)

I sowed those same seeds (Ferry Morse) back in April or May last year in small pots. They grew some, then in September, as the annuals were starting to look crummy, stuck them in the ground. They've made it so far, and one actually has a bud already. The bed is south-facing.
From Wintersowing 2010

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 10:53AM
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gardenluv(8)

Hmmm. Okay. I guess I will just cross my fingers and hope for the best knowing I may get blooms but I may not. I wish they put better info on the back of the package! They are so pretty though I could not help myself. Darn Home Depot for having seeds in!

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 11:24AM
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barbe_wa

I'm not sure if they're perennial or biennial or what, but they have self-sown all over my yard. They are really very pretty when they start peeking through the grass and mowing doesn't seem to hurt them. It takes the flowers off, but they rebloom quickly. I'm in Zone 8 which could make a difference in how long they live.

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 1:53PM
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courtcourt

I went ahead and winter sowed some of these a couple of weeks ago. One container has had sprouts for at least a week, and the other has nothing. Same packet of seeds.

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 9:25PM
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gardenluv(8)

Okay, so here's another question....if they do sprout (and I don't really doubt they will) what should I do? Plant them in a container which I can then move next winter, or do I go ahead and plant them in the ground knowing that they may not return the following spring?

    Bookmark   January 29, 2010 at 11:01PM
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SilkySappho(6a)

I potted six or so pots (small, cheap pots) INDOORS with the english daisies, which I intend to put in the ground (in full sun) after (I hope) sprout and are at least five inches high, sturdy, and frosts are past. But I, too, am confused with the bi-perennial-semi-annual rigmarole Ferry Morse is spewing. I also planted some ED's into a hanging pot along with six of my home harvested nasturtiums (nearly 95% of my seeds are harvested from my own yard; dried at least 30 days then packeted into envelopes with names, dates and where the seeds were taken from clearly marked), and intend to put that in a hanger that gets a lot of sun). I've got, quite literally, about 50,000 marigold seeds, from 4" to 4 FEET high, from my own garden. They lasted, and bloomed, from mid summer (I sowed them late and IN the ground or they'd have bloomed even longer!) to late autumn/early winter. If anyone wants some, just send me an email (skimmel666@comcast.com) and I will send you my home addy, and you can send ME an SASE (weight: about two ounces, send two stamps): they realy are amazingly hardy and gorgeous. (Also started some inside about a week ago.)
So much for asides: I'll let y'all know if the ED's sprout, or bloom, or perish, or take over the world. I LOVE the idea of sprinkling some in the lawn! (We have 1/4 acre of lawns and hate every blade. We've carved out five areas on the front lawn for bulbs and annuals, and look forward to doing many more. I hate mowing and strimming. Grrr.)

    Bookmark   January 22, 2014 at 1:44PM
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sandyslopes z5 n. UT

I wintersowed English Daisies several years ago. I thought they were perennials so I went to a lot of trouble to plant a lot of them on both sides of a walkway. The first year after planting I did get a few blooms on some of them. They came back the 2nd year and bloomed pretty nice. Year 3, nothing at all. Not a trace. No seeding around, either. Gone! So they were true biennials for me.

    Bookmark   January 23, 2014 at 2:03AM
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docmom_gw Zone 5 MI(5)

I've not grown ED, but I grew Canturbery Bells for the first time a few years ago and they are supposed to biennials. They bloomed the second year, as expected, and then again the next summer! I think the term biennial refers to plants that are especially short-lived and should only be counted on to bloom their second season, but they can surprise us if they are in a particularly good spot and the weather cooperates. The hard part is remembering to sow them every year, so you always have plants coming into their "good" season. It would be nice if they would self-sow themselves, but we'd still only have blooms every other year. I planted a larger patch of my Bells last year, so I'm hoping for a nice show this year. I may try sprinkling what seeds I have left around the plants to encourage seedlings. Good luck with the EDs!

Martha

    Bookmark   January 25, 2014 at 10:44AM
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