What tree would you put in place of the Bradford Pear?

jess2132000(PA)June 22, 2011

We would like to have the biggest bradford pear taking down in the fall. We will probably have the other one done in a year or two as well. The front and biggest one is going first and we want to replace it with another smaller tree. I am considering Japanese White Lilac ir Purple Plum. Any sugguestions which one would look best out front of the house?

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billydoo

Cleveland pear! ;-)

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 8:32PM
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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

Billy, I sure hope you are just kidding. Maybe that's what the winking smiley was for, but I can't tell.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 8:35PM
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jamiedolan(4/5)

Are you afraid it is going to break and fall on your house / car? That does happen. It is a pretty tree and it's giving you some shade.

Are you looking to just put in something ornamental that doesn't get more than about 10' x 10'?

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 9:38PM
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jess2132000(PA)

Well i was thinking White lilac tree which gets 20 ft high or something not as tall as this. Yes it scares me to think of this breaking onto the cars and also the roots are starting to crack the driveway. im gonna miss the shade but want to replace it with a smaller tree with less agressive roots. May move it over a foot or two to the right more as well.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 9:43PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Your Japanese Lilac tree is a good choice. They are quite drought tolerant once established and you definitely need that for that location. I really like the 'Summer Snow' cultivar. Blooms on't brown as much as they fade compared to 'Ivory Silk'.

'Sundak' also looks like a promising cultivar. Leaves are smaller so it gives a finer texture, which may be more desirable based on the close proximity to the house. I believe it is crossed with Prunus maackii so it has a peely, more vibrant bark compared to the the other Lilacs.

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 10:35PM
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jamiedolan(4/5)

Just some ideas....

You could also look at a large slow growing tree that doesn't tend to have the aggressive root problems. Such as a sugar maple.

A Korean maple looks similar to a Japanese Maple, but may be a bit tougher. It would not be very aggressive and would get to around 15 feet.

Jamie

    Bookmark   June 22, 2011 at 10:57PM
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laceyvail(6A, WV)

Consider a Halesia if you want a flowering tree, very beautiful, some types taller than others. Japanese tree lilacs don't smell very good in flower.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 6:24AM
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lou_midlothian_tx(z8 DFW, Tx)

Trident Maple or Shantung Maple. Medium size.

Hopefully, that large bradford pear won't split in half and fall on your car or the house. I've seen that happen a few times over the years whenever a very strong storm blew through.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 7:24AM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

I think Koelreuteria paniculata would look nice.

Dax

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 9:18AM
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esh_ga

Koelreuteria paniculata - excessive seedlings can be a problem.

How does Crape Myrtle do in Pennsylvania? (And as long as you don't try to keep it pruned because that makes it ugly.)

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 9:22AM
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billydoo

yes, i am very much kidding. i learned of their viral habit after mine was planted.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 9:38AM
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gardener365(5b Illinois USA)

Laburnum anagyroides or Styrax japonicus: options

Dax

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 5:15PM
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drrich2(6)

Would a paperbark maple survive there? Not familiar with that locality.

Richard.

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 7:25PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Sure it would but not the right spot in opinion. Too exposed, too dry, too much concrete, plenty of pitch so most water will run off unless you have slow soakers. Not to mention if its a busy road might get some salt spray too.

Drought tolerance is key!

    Bookmark   June 23, 2011 at 10:02PM
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