Aftermarket Brakes for Garden Tractor

elkhorn88December 12, 2007

I've recently purchased a used Craftsman 18hp garden tractor, approximetly 10 years old. I removed the grass cutter because I have no need of it. I use the tractor to pull a trailer to haul up firewood from my property. My property is on a slope, the tractor has no brakes. Are there aftermarket brakes available for garden tractors?...Mine is a craftsman, model# 917.255980

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tomplum

Were parts taken off it? The thing was made with band style brakes. I don't recall aftermarket brakes for a garden tractor. Replacement parts are likely available. You can buy several brake kits for go carts. That would be interesting. Is it maybe the wrong vehicle for the terrain/ load?

    Bookmark   December 12, 2007 at 8:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
machiem(Z8 WA)

if you go to the sears parts webpage and enter your model number, you'll be able to find the parts for your tractor.

Select the bubble for "view parts list" or "view diagram" for ground drive. The brake band is item 11 (part number 101122M) and is $41.67 before tax and shipping.

As an alternative, you can search m-and-d.com and enter that same part number and you'll get this result

As a side note, I wouldn't put too much faith in the brakes on a garden tractor. They are meant for parking and even then, I would park sideways on hills just to make sure, especially if you're towing a trailer full of wood.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2007 at 10:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
johntommybob

machiem is right, and any farmer would tell you that you never depend on a tractor's brakes to hold you back going down a slope, especially while towing a load: tractor brakes were just not designed to do that. You put it in the lowest gear (before you start down the slope) and let the engine do the braking.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2007 at 9:13AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canguy(British Columbia)

Is it a hydro transmission? They depend on the transmission internals for brakes. The others are right, that is not the best machine for your intended purpose.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2007 at 9:19AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
elkhorn88

Thank you everyone for your quick answers...I do use the tractor in the lowest gear and let it idle down the hill, the path is sloped but at an angle. In one spot for only a few feet the slope is too much and the transmission won't hold it back. I never haul wood down, only up the hill. The tractor has plenty of power for that, but just a little light and sometimes the wheels spin for lack of weight. It was really a trial, got an exceptionally good deal on it so figured I would give it a try. If nothing else it's sure fun to drive...

    Bookmark   December 13, 2007 at 9:41AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
markmgm(ne OH)

How much weight are you hauling? I have a 95 22hp Craftsman I use for much the same as you. It's a six speed with HI-LO range. In Lo range I can haul some pretty heavy weight down hill. The same weight in Hi range and the tractor has a mind of its own on the same hill.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2007 at 4:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
butchs_hobby(s texas)

Your machine should have a brake, but it won't help more than the tranny if one of your tires are slipping. The brake on most garden tractors is attached to the trans and works through it not on the axles individually. In other words one wheel can spin backswards and the other forword and the brake is locked on. I'd fix the brake but you need to fill the rear tires with fluid. Night and day difference in traction, loss of traction is why the tranny is not holding the load in the one spot you mentioned.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2007 at 8:31PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
elkhorn88

MARKMGM, mine has 18 h.p. and I am hauling only a few hundred lbs. right now, I notice the engine doesn't even seem to know there's a load on it at all. There's no doubt that it can handle a lot more. It's also a six-speed, same as yours, I believe the thing could climb a tree if it could get good traction. BUTCHS HOBBY, fill tires with fluid?...Interesting, I've never even heard of that, I can see how it would ad to the weight and traction. How exactly do you fill the tire with fluid and have enough pressure for inflation?...I've read that you can also get tire weights. I did use a tie-down and put a log, approximetly 80 lbs or so on the hitch and it climbed up the hill a lot easier, so that tells me it's the weight distribution that's the biggest problem. The clutch pedal also says brake, but push it all the way down and it's like putting it in what I used to refer to as "Angel Gear" or, neutral, it's just cut loose. It seems all I can do is keep it in low gear, at the lowest idle and says a few prayers. Thank you guys for your help, you're all great!

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 2:34AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mownie(7)

elkhorn88, click on link below

Here is a link that might be useful: filling tires

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 11:05AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mownie(7)

If you want more, just click this

Here is a link that might be useful: fluid tire gauge ??

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 11:21AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
johntommybob

"The clutch pedal also says brake, but push it all the way down and it's like putting it in what I used to refer to as "Angel Gear" or, neutral, it's just cut loose."

That's exctly the problem with Garden tractor brakes - and why they are no good at all for using on a hill. As you said, pushing the brake takes it out of gear, and if you have a load pushing you, and, depending how big the load is, and how steep the hill is, one can wind up in a heap of trouble.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 3:26PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mith(South England)

put it in a low gear at the top of the hill and ease it down, shouldnt need to use the brakes.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 5:49PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
butchs_hobby(s texas)

Elkhorn88, our shop push tractor is a 1450MF with 10.50x23x12 rear tires. When we first started useing it(pushing disabled vehicles) it would spin the rear tires easy, filled them with fluid and no problems since, pushs 1 ton duallys withoput spinning! I bought the adopter to put fluid in the tires at TSC. Most any implement dealer or farm type store would probably have it. Depends on your weather but down here I just put in plain water. My 1855MF is going on 12 yrs with water in the rear ags.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2007 at 8:46PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
tow-behind spreaders
Hi Everyone, I am looking to start using a tow-behind...
fcarp63
John Deere 245 Won't Start (Kawasaki 14hp)
I have a ~15 year old John Deere 245 with a Kawasaki...
lawfires
Briggs and Stratton 25hp els OHV help!!!!
I got a this motor attached to a mover off a craigslist...
H&M Contractors
Briggs & Stratton OHV Intek Hard Starting
I am another of the seemingly many people fighting...
dreamoftheflood
Tuff Torq K46 Tranny
I've been reading many of the posts on this site and...
tuco
Sponsored Products
Ar Ruthiane Polished Copper 48-Inch Ceiling Fan with Mahogany Blades
Bellacor
Luxor Tub Cart - RDTC211RD
Beyond Stores
Fisher-Price Power Wheels Dune Racer ATV Battery Powered Riding Toy - Purple - B
$319.99 | Hayneedle
Glide Bikes 12 in. Go Glider Balance Bike - Green - MG12-G
$99.00 | Hayneedle
Luxor Tub Cart - RDTC221RD
Beyond Stores
Garage Flooring Accessories: Diamond Deck Garage Flooring Metallic Silver 2 Car
Home Depot
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™