Zone 6 hardy lagerstroemia's? Crape Myrtle

toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)July 12, 2013

Folks around here sure like their Crapes this time of year. The mother in law wants me to take a couple cuttings of a unnamed pink Crapemyrtle a neighbor has growing well in the warm protected suburbs.

Naturally no one knows which cultivar it is though.

The box stores list Sioux as zone 6 hardy and my Dynamite as zone 7. Given the die back I see on Dynamite zone 7 seems right..

This and other posts have me thinking, what is the most cold hardy cultivar?

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subtropix

Supposedly, the hardiest are the 'Fauriei' hybrids. How do you know which they are? Well, they were all given names of Native American tribes (Zuni, Hopi, etc.). You will note from the listing below, that 'Dynamite' is not one of the hybrids ('Catawba' is, if you read further). I am in Zone 7a/b, so I see no real difference comparing the Dynamites to the hybrid series.

Here is a link that might be useful: Some Crape Myrtle varieties

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 6:48AM
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rogerzone6

This is the second summer for our 2 Dynamites in zone 6a/b. They seem to remain shrubby, but so far no real dieback. Keep them mulched.

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 9:57AM
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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

"Supposedly, the hardiest are the 'Fauriei' hybrids. How do you know which they are? Well, they were all given names of Native American tribes (Zuni, Hopi, etc.)."

The crape myrtles with native american tribe names are releases from the USNA (at least in all cases I can think of). The tribe names have nothing do do with their parentage, and as a matter of fact, âÂÂCatawbaâÂÂ, âÂÂCherokeeâÂÂ, âÂÂConestogaâÂÂ, âÂÂPotomacâÂÂ, âÂÂPowhatanâÂÂ, and âÂÂSeminoleâ are all examples of native american tribe names for cultivars with no fauriei parentage. Cultivars from other hybridizers with fauriei parentage never (that I can think of) have native american tribe names.

The L indica cultivars (no fauriei parentage), 'Filli Red', 'Filli Coral', 'Filli Violet' are supposedly hardy to zone 4 (at least in certain conditions). 'Sarahs Favorite' is reported hardy to -12F. L. indica 'Whit III' (Pink Velour) is reportedly hardy to -8F.

This post was edited by brandon7 on Fri, Jul 12, 13 at 13:04

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 12:34PM
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subtropix

So, the information in the attached source is erroneous (similarly reported in multiple references).

Now I'm confused.

Here is a link that might be useful: Indian series Crapes

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 3:03PM
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bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Essential flowering shrub and small tree in Zone 6 to 9, but now becoming common further North. I observed healthy flowering plants in St. Louis, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, and on Long Island....

....The Filligree⢠Series, from FlemingâÂÂs, Nebraska, coral, red, violet, were touted as cold hardy to -30ðF. Absolutely not true. Tested in Athens and so-so. Flower colors not particularly rich. All susceptible to Cercospora leaf spot, particularly âÂÂRed FilliâÂÂ

Here is a link that might be useful: Lagerstroemia- Crapemyrtle: Advances in Crapemyrtle Breeding

This post was edited by bboy on Fri, Jul 12, 13 at 17:22

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 5:18PM
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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

"So, the information in (Floridata) is erroneous."

Yep, I'd say, at least the way it's written, it's wrong. Many of the USNA cultivars were as stated, but not all.
__________________

"....The Filligree⢠Series, from FlemingâÂÂs..."

As stated above, they "are supposedly hardy to zone 4 (at least in certain conditions)." I think there is little doubt that the Filli cultivars survived successfully, in zone 4, for the hybridizers. Not all zone 4 conditions are the same, as we all know.

    Bookmark   July 12, 2013 at 5:40PM
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beng(z6 western MD)

Even white-flowered Natchez here is a decided multi-stemmed shrub w/a fair amount of winterkill.

    Bookmark   July 13, 2013 at 9:29AM
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bboy(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

The first point to establish in such discussions is what somebody is calling hardy. Some appear to think if a specimen does not die completely then it can be called hardy. The Flemings claims need to be substantiated with specific information about how the plants tested were handled and what condition the plants were in after -30F - maybe this is available, I haven't looked. Meanwhile, M Dirr stating flatly that it is false that they are that hardy is not a good sign.

This post was edited by bboy on Sat, Jul 13, 13 at 18:24

    Bookmark   July 13, 2013 at 2:02PM
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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

"The first point to establish in such discussions is what somebody is calling hardy."

Not necessarily. Since Toronado lives in zone 6, I'd expect the Filli series to survive if given decent conditions.

Now, if we were seeking to give a general rating to these plants, that might be a different story. But, that's not the point of this thread.

    Bookmark   July 13, 2013 at 8:13PM
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