Patmore Green Ash question

katrina1(OK)July 5, 2007

Has anyone grown the Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Patmore'?

I especially would like to know what kinds of debris it drops when it is at the age where the female green ash cultivars would be fruiting.

In my research the thing that confuses me is the way I've so often seen its seedless characteristic listed.

Usually I see the 'Patmore' seedless indication listed as follows:

Fruit: seedless

What does this mean? Does it mean that the tree produces a seedless fruit that will become debris which drops off the tree later? Why would a male tree cultivar ever produce fruit?

Please explain, I am confused. If it is a fruitless male tree; why isn't the tree simply listed as fruitless or none on the Fruit indicator; instead it being listed as "seedless"?

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wisconsitom

Katrina, your question has me feeling a bit embarrased. Why? Because we've got thousands of that cultivar on our streets, many of which I planted, and I don't know the answer to your question!

Generally, green ash cultivars have tended to produce some nasty surprises once they get old enough to flower/fruit. One thinks of the old "Marshals Seedless" to know what I'm talking about.

Yes, I think Patmore is considered a male clone but even then I suppose there could be some litter from the pollen-bearing flowers. Do you have ash flower gall in your area? Then you get crunchberries.

+oM

    Bookmark   July 6, 2007 at 10:29AM
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quirkyquercus

Can you elaborate a little more on the surprises with marshall's seedlesh ash please tom?

    Bookmark   July 6, 2007 at 4:16PM
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wisconsitom

Sure Quirky. Lots of seeds on some plants. Not to neglect mentioning a generally crappy structure (I think).

+oM

    Bookmark   July 6, 2007 at 6:22PM
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katrina1(OK)

There are reports that The male 'Marshall's seedless' ash cultivar is intermixed with female ash trees labeled with the same cultivar name.

I also read that the newer male 'Patmore' ash cultivar grows into a much better form. I was also wondering if the Bayer brand systemic product for trees could prevent the gull mites and other common pest which like to attack ash trees? The advice given me was to apply that systemic treatment to the trees if they were not already treated at the nursery. Then a tree would only need the Bayer Systemic treatment given again in the Fall each following year.

Does anyone think that Bayer product and advice on how to use it will be effective to prevent the 'Patmore' Green Ash tree from being so attacked and producing gulls or being harmed worse by other bugs?

Wisconsitom, Do you like the branching patterns of your neighborhood ash trees that are not the Marshall's seedless cultivar?

    Bookmark   July 6, 2007 at 10:41PM
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wisconsitom

Kat, all the green ash cultivars that we've used look better than "Marshall" except for the cultivar "Summit". That one's a mess too. Patmore really looks good so far, with the oldest trees of that type having been planted in the 80's.

Without a Bayer Systemic label in front of me, can't really comment on that part of your question. We're in the expected tragectory of Emerald Ash Borer, so definitely not worrying about flower gall mite!

+oM

    Bookmark   July 8, 2007 at 12:04PM
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katrina1(OK)

I think the the Bayer Systemic product is reported to be very effective against borer infestations, especially if the product is applied early enough so that the tree has time to take up the product before the first phase of Borer invasion begins. That is why in Zones which experience the spring, summer, fall, winter seasons each year, fall is usually the recommended yearly application time for the product, even if the tree was treated in a different season at the nursery or when the tree was first planted.

    Bookmark   July 9, 2007 at 12:21AM
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quirkyquercus

Thanks it is highly unusual to find ashes planted here in GA so I am not familiar with these.

    Bookmark   July 9, 2007 at 11:01AM
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wisconsitom

You're on the right track, Kat. A memory bubble just came up-isn't the Bayer Systemic equivalent to Merit insecticide? If so then yes, fall apps are often best for the reasons you've stated.

+oM

    Bookmark   July 9, 2007 at 10:10PM
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katrina1(OK)

Wisconsitom, do your area 20 year old Patmore trees drop fruit; even though that would not normally be expected, since they are males?

Also, can you describe for me what its male flowers look like on the tree and after they drop to the ground as a humus contribution debris?

    Bookmark   July 10, 2007 at 4:28PM
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wisconsitom

Kat, to the best of my knowledge, there have been no flowers/fruitings on any of our Patmores. Just nice glossy green foliage. A good tree but we have completely stopped planting them, or any other ash variety. The emerald ash borer is just too close by, with known presence in N. Illinois. That's only 200 miles from here.

+oM

    Bookmark   July 10, 2007 at 9:42PM
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katrina1(OK)

Thanks for the info.

    Bookmark   July 11, 2007 at 1:14AM
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