Sterilizing with horseradish

woohoomanNovember 3, 2012

I've read about using horseradish and peroxide to sterilize garden soil to rid it of harmful virii, bacteria, and fungi.

Has anybody tried this method and was it effective?

Any feedback is welcome.

Thanks.

Kevin

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

Where did you read that? Sounds like someone's wishful thinking.

Also need to know what you're trying to get rid of. Rotating crops is a good strategy to reduce or get rid of some organisms.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 12:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
woohooman

I think I originally read it here.

Here is a link that might be useful: click here

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 12:42AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

Hydrogen peroxide in large enough quantities could sterilize your soil but I'd think that would get too expensive before it was effective. Since horseradish grows in our soils why would anyone think it might be an effective anti biotic in soil?

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 6:29AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jean001a(Portland OR 7b)

The site you linked states in part, based on research from 1995 "minced horseradish combined with hydrogen peroxide can completely remove chlorinated phenols and other contaminants found in industrial wastes."

So, even if subsequent research found that to be effective, how can it be useful for home gardens & landscapes?

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 2:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardengal48

If you read that link, it says nothing about horseradish in relation to soil bacteria, fungi or viruses or any other soil microorganisms. That it may have some insecticidal properties is quite likely - a good many plants do as natural defense mechanisms against predation - but that is a far cry from any sort of "soil sterilization" action.

And unless you have some very serious soil pathogenic problems, sterilization via any method is NOT the route to go! A "sterile" soil is by definition not a healthy soil. The best way to rid your soil of harmful organisms is to encourage the beneficial organisms. And there are far more of them and in much greater populations anyway. The best way to encourage even more beneficial activity and numbers is by liberal applications of organic matter. Compost - which is used to remediate contaminated soils - would be my OM of choice.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 2:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

In the words of a great philosopher...."Good grief".

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 3:49PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jean001a(Portland OR 7b)
    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 7:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
RpR_(3-4)

Horseradish (preventative for fungal disease)
Penn State University announced in 1995 that minced horseradish holds promise in decontaminating wastewater and now says it may clean contaminated soils as well!
Penn State's center for Bioremediation and Detoxification reports that minced horseradish combined with hydrogen peroxide can completely remove chlorinated phenols and other contaminants found in industrial wastes.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2012 at 9:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

From that Golden Harvest web site, "Having healthy soil and a good eco-balance in your yard allows nature to take care of itself. Keeping the soil in top condition is the number one way to have healthy, strong plants! Plants have naturally inherent abilities to ward off adverse conditions when living in healthy soil."

    Bookmark   November 5, 2012 at 6:21AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toxcrusadr

I haven't read the links, but if your garden soil is contaminated with industrial chemicals, you're probably going to need more than horseradish to fix it. :-]

    Bookmark   November 5, 2012 at 1:25PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toxcrusadr

OK I couldn't help looking at the GHOrganics link. So Penn State did a study that showed horseradish and peroxide would degrade chlorinated phenols in wastewater. The idea that it would also treat 'contaminated soil' most likely was related to soil contaminated with those same chemicals. It's completely bogus to quote this as evidence that it will treat insect or disease problems in the garden.

"Hey, Compound W worked on my warts, maybe I'll buy a drum of it and rid my garden of pests!"

    Bookmark   November 5, 2012 at 1:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
RpR_(3-4)

What ever it does, to make it work you have plants Horseradish and apply Hydrogen Peroxide right after you till the roots.
Could be expensive.

    Bookmark   November 5, 2012 at 1:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
woohooman

Jean:

The reason I posted in 2 different forums is because I noticed different forums have more traffic that others and I'd like to get as much feedback as possible.

I apologize if that's a no-no.

:)

Kevin

    Bookmark   November 5, 2012 at 5:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
toxcrusadr

I've done the same thing once or twice, I don't think it's punishable by death. :-]

    Bookmark   November 6, 2012 at 10:07AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

Jean is just reminding you of your other post so that you don't overlook the other responses.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2012 at 2:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
woohooman

Here's another area. That's a rectangular raised area that has the brick wall forming one "L" and the stackable brick forming the other "L". I'm thinking that the stackable sides "breathe" too much -- which would possibly not allow the soil to heat up to optimum temps.

Kevin

    Bookmark   November 8, 2012 at 2:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
woohooman

Sorry. I meant to post this post PRIOR to the last.

Ok -- I said I'd try to get a couple pics to show why solarization is difficult for the areas I garden. So, here they are.

It would be easier if the fence wasn't there so I could just walk along that edge, tuck the plastic, and the cover with soil. But I end up trying to straddle the whole width with my feet. I'm sure it looks pretty funny while I do it.

Kevin

    Bookmark   November 8, 2012 at 3:03PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Weeds and pollinators
Spring is just around the corner, uh huh yes it is,...
kimmq
How quickly can I lower pH of soil in order to plant acidic plants?
I'm hoping someone can help me with my dilemma! I...
stillasprout
Fungus in compost
This pile was started about 3 weeks ago. It is overun...
jon2412
Frozen compost
Ok so the deep freeze here in nj is not letting up...
jrupjr
No till garden/no weeds?
Is there a good way to keep weeds down in an established...
hummersteve
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™