Hollyhock in container?

katefisher(Z7_NorthernCA)November 2, 2008

Last year I planted hollyhocks in our back yard and this year they bloomed wonderfully. However as soon as they became heavy with blooms the spider mites moved in and they started flopping. I suspect the major flopping was due to limited sun and water runoff from the lawn. Also I have roses planted relatively close by so the spider mite issue was a real problem.

I want to move them in the spring. My choices are plant them in various large containers or a really hot, dry spot with kind of iffy soil along the fence. If neither of those will work I'll probably give them away.

Thank you.

Kate

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gardengal48

My choice would be the hot, dry location with iffy soil :-)) Hollyhocks are pretty tough plants that seem to thrive with minimal attention - too lush growing conditions tend to make them more vulnerable to problems, like the spider mites and rust.

    Bookmark   November 2, 2008 at 9:54AM
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christinmk z5b eastern WA

Hi Kate! I too would go with the hot/dry situation instead of the pot. Hollyhocks have long tap-roots that do not like to be disturbed. I have gotten a few to transplant though. Just make sure to water them for awhile after.
Even with the largest of pots I don't think they would like it much.
They will likely get yellowed leaves in the dry spot, so consider planting something in front of them.
Hope this helps.
CMK

    Bookmark   November 2, 2008 at 7:28PM
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katefisher(Z7_NorthernCA)

Thank you both very much.

Well that's what I needed:) I suspect you are both correct, that the container thing would not work out well. GardenGal what you said was interesting about the spider mites especially. I noticed that one of my neighbors who has let his hollyhocks and CA poppies take over his side yard and does not water still has hollyhocks blooming and did not seem troubled by bugs at all.

I think next year my husband and I will build a simple, shallow wood planter and put it on the top of the ground with the iffy soil. That way it will have some amended soil in the planter itself but they can still grow down into the ground. CMK, good suggestion about keeping them watered until I see new growth. I hope to do this early in Spring of 2009. I've been thinking of planting California poppy seeds in with them. Not sure what else might make it in a dry space like that which would also look pretty. It could be an annual or perennial and would have to love being hot and miserable all summer:)

Appreciate the help, thanks again.

Kate

    Bookmark   November 3, 2008 at 9:01AM
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albert_135(Sunset 2 or 3)

Out here in the high deserts of the Great Basin hollyhocks are a favorite because the grow so well in iffy soil along the fences.

    Bookmark   November 3, 2008 at 1:56PM
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katefisher(Z7_NorthernCA)

Albert:

We aren't terribly far away from one another. I'm in Northern California specifically the town of Quincy, CA. We get more moisture than you folks though I suspect. Although this summer it rained exactly only for about five minutes.

I'll definitely go for planting in the iffy soil option. Thanks.

Kate

    Bookmark   November 3, 2008 at 3:22PM
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