Replanting after RRD

lainey2(7a)November 17, 2012

I dug out two RRD infected rose shrubs in July, digging deep and wide to get out all the roots. They were huge shrubs, 5X5, at least. I did not remove all the soil because that would have been more than I could handle. Is there anyway to sterilize the soil so that I can replant this year? They were centerpiece plants and I miss them so much.

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dublinbay z6 (KS)

I don't think you need to worry about the soil. That is not how RRD is passed on. Instead, it is transmitted by a tiny mite blown in the wind which, by chance, deposits it on your shrub--purely a chance event as far as we know. In the US, there is no "replant disease" as such.

As long as you did such a thorough job digging up the roots, you should be fine--unless more mites get blown into your yard because neighbors have infected plants or you are near the outskirts of town so that the wind blows in mites from infected wild roses.

At least, that is how I have understood it.

My sympathies--I had 2 cases of RRD earlier this summer. One of the roses I lost was an old established climber--that really hurt!

Kate

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 9:39AM
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michaelg(7a NC Mts)

Kate is right--it isn't a soil disease.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 11:08AM
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lainey2(7a)

Thanks, Kate and michaelg. One interesting note. The two big shrubs I had planted five years ago with great care, all the soil ammendments, wide hole, etc. I also lost a lovely Lowes shrub that I had just dumped in a small hole. It thrived and bloomed also. The two I had planted with care had relatively shallow roots, the soil still loose and friable after five years. The one I planted on a day I was tired, had huge deep roots and went down so far I couldn't get them all out. The soil was still pretty much clay. All three shrubs were healthy and beautiful until RRD.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 10:01PM
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Terry Crawford

I had to take out my huge 'Autumn Sunset' climber yesterday that was absolutely covered in RRD. I suspect the mites blew in on the rain and wind that came with Hurricane Issac. It is amazing how quickly a rose can get infected and show those classic witches brooms.

I've tried to grow climbers across this huge pergola twice now and each time I've had to take them out due to RRD. What this tells me is that this pergola is in a prime location for dropping the mites, so I'm going to plant clematis.

Lainey, I know how you feel when you have to take out part of your beautiful garden. I feel like at some point I'm going to be losing all my roses to RRD and putting in shrubs and conifers.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 10:48AM
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dublinbay z6 (KS)

terry, you have my sympathy. The wind currents must aim directly for your pergola--unfortunately. The only consolation is that clematis are lovely also!

Kate

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 10:35PM
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lainey2(7a)

It heartbreaking. I'll replant two of the four in the spring, I guess, until I get too old, sick, or tired to keep replanting. Nothing I could replace them with is as beautiful as the rose. Sigh.

    Bookmark   November 22, 2012 at 11:09PM
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