fall color observations...

hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)October 18, 2013

Today driving to work...

Liriodendrons - showing some surprisingly strong color this year so far. Although a good percentage (30-40%) became mostly defoliated about a month ago, due to our now-ended short-term late summer drought (ended with last week's 6" of rain), those in moister areas that held most or all of their leaves are turning a nice bright yellow so far this fall, much better than last year.

Carya - I have trouble telling the different hickory species apart, but they're often a forgotten piece of the autumnal landscape. Gorgeous deep yellow, almost orange at times, with a touch of brown undertones. They're turning nicely now and should peak this weekend.

Acer - the Acer rubrums of course vary considerably. The earlier-changing specimens were weakly colored, at best, and defoliated fast, due to the dryness and heat of September through early October, but those that are just now showing color change look to be quite stunning this year. Peak will be from now through early Nov between cultivars and species/wild trees (normal).

The saccharums are weird. There are some sugar maples around here that have an almost pinkish-red tone starting to show, very intense, while others are barely even turning yellow - even those trees that usually color quite nicely. Again, I think it's the timing - the earlier coloring specimens got started by the cool clear nights and sunny days of September, but got too dry, and our week of 90s in early October dried them out too fast, while those that held their green a bit longer look to be quite nice. Overall the sugar maples will end up about average, but with extremes of very poor and very good color. Expect peak color in about 7-10 days on these.

Most other maples (Japanese, Norway, etc) are still solid green.

Nyssa - they're on FIRE around here, and mostly past peak already, but a few here and there are still peaking. Good color (as is usual in this are) on most of the tupelos (or blackgum if you prefer) this year. Peak was about 10/5.

Liquidambar: All over the map, but generally looking to have a good year. My sweetgum (a 12' volunteer sapling), which has been a dud until now, is showing yellow inner leaves and developing some nice purple-red on some of the upper leaves (the most sun-exposed). Peak around Nov 1-10?

Oaks:

Red Group:

Some sort of leaf scorch or blight is turning most of the red oaks (rubra, velutina, coccinea, palustris, phellos) brown & many are already half-bare. Those that still have nice canopies are mostly still all green, but some pin oaks are showing a little red or bronze.
Jury still out.

White Group:

Mostly green & leaves overall far healthier this year than the reds. Some of the Q. albas and Q. stellatas I see around are turning a nice maroon on some of the older, inner leaves, so they're looking promising. Expecting an above-average year for the white oaks. Peak after 11/1 most likely as is typical.

Just a summary of what I saw this morning at home and on my drive.

Pics to follow if I can snap some this weekend.

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Sequoiadendron4(6B)

Nice assessment! It surely has been an odd fall so far in our area. Our Liquidambar started losing inner leaves in September because of the drought, I only hope that we can get some good color out of it before they are all gone. Our Gleditsia triacanthos "Suncole" is usually defoliated by late September but still has about 35% of it's leaves, the Acer rubrum 'Red Sunset' hasn't really shown any color yet, which is also odd. Forget about the Gingko or Metasequoia doing any color as they are usually late turners

    Bookmark   October 18, 2013 at 11:24AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Gingkos are typically full green until after the first of November here, but then turn pretty quickly.

The Metasequoias and Taxodium are about the lushest green they've been all year right now and also will be one of the last to color.

The Acer rubrum 'Red Sunset' that lines the street here just has a hint of some red the last couple days. After a rainy, cloudy week, we have returned to the sunny mild days/chilly nights pattern that produces the best color just these last couple days, and the weather for the next week is expected to be highs in the 60s and lows in the 40s with lots of sunshine.

    Bookmark   October 18, 2013 at 11:35AM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Fall color is about done here. Same observations with the Sugar Maples.

The trees in my yard...another story. Too damn healthy and none of them have started to turn.

Damn 20s are rolling in this week so not going to be much this year except for the tough. I'll get nice color from my oaks.

    Bookmark   October 18, 2013 at 5:47PM
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beng(z6 western MD)

Here, there's two phases of color in the general forest. First, the sugar maples, basswoods, etc, that lose leaves early -- later, oaks, hickories, etc. Tuliptree color/timing depends on site and dryness, like Hair notes.

Some vivid yellows just upslope right now are bitternuts and tuliptrees. My little Shellbark hickories are golden yellow. Tiny sourwood is scarlet red.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 9:48AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

A few pics, with descriptions underneath:

Sweetgums - bad pic, I was driving.

Two sugar maples that started turning in mid-Sept. The one on the right in front of the pine was quite orange but is already bare (it has looked stressed and is probably on the way out), and the other, usually quite orange, is yellow this year, although a quite nice yellow.

A young sugar maple near Carraba's in Ellicott City, MD, I think it's a 'Legacy' but might also be 'Commemoration'. These trees are always more on the orange-yellow end of the spectrum vs. the red-orange end.

Near Outback Steakhouse (next door to the one above), same shopping center. Also sugar maple, probably 'Legacy' or 'Commemoration' but much more green still. The leaf shape of the trees in the last two pics is the smaller, thicker leaf typical of those two cultivars. Since 'Legacy' is generally less "red" than 'Commemoration' I'm leaning towards 'Legacy' as the cultivar.

Another young sugar maple, this one is near the one above, in the same shopping center, but I believe the cultivar is either 'Green Mountain' or possibly 'Bailsta' - MUCH deeper orange/red.

An ash of some sort, the deepest purple I've seen in one.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 8:42PM
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jdo053103(7b - NC)

Just my observations from my property
Red maples - nothing yet, still green and full. Jury still out.
Sweetgum - some yellowing, some red and some a deeper red, looking like its going to be a good year for them.
Elms - slippery elms already dropped leaves. winged elms not doing much, trying to turn a yellow brown. Not going to be a good year.
Black cherry - dropped all leaves last month. A dud.
White ash - terrible year, nothing showy, turned a dull yellow orange and dropped about 50%. Have one that is still green close to my lawn, so maybe that one will put on a show.
Red oaks - pin, shumard, northern red and willow - nothing really yet, a couple pins have some sort or leaf blight thing going that someone mentioned above.
Dogwoods - looking good, turning a nice redish color.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 10:43PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

The Dogwoods are stunning this year, but most have already dropped 75% of their leaves. Both florida and kousa,

As I said earlier, a few white oaks are showing a bit of red in the inner leaves but nothing I could get a good photo of from the car or ground. It's odd in that some areas, every white oak I see has those inner leaves reddening, and other areas, just a mile away, the inner leaves are more of a brown-yellow instead. Almost as if there is some genetic grouping to fall color, but I've never noticed it that specifically before this year. I'll have to keep an eye on it. Or, it could be soil texture, nutrient, or moisture conditions.

We drove to the western part of my county today, and went through some areas where trees were actually PAST peak in color with many trees bare!! The only thing I can think of is those areas have lighter or sandier soils, that were more adversely affected by our short flash-drought this summer.

I did see a pin oak today with some good color developing - at least around here they tend to color up the earliest of the oaks. Didn't have that scorch/blight thing on it, either.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 11:08PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Mentioning elms:

The slippery & American elms are trying to turn a decent yellow, but the leaves are dropping quickly as they turn, so it's hard to say if they'll make a nice display or not.

There is a planting of one of the "hybrid" elms, I think they're either 'Accolade' or 'Triumph' near my office that is turning a nice yellow.

The Zelkovas in my town are a nice orange this year & should peak in about a week.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 11:11PM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

I'm getting a little color from my Japanese Maples.

    Bookmark   October 19, 2013 at 11:32PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

As someone else mentioned, the Red maples aren't doing much here. There's a large one next door, I believe it's an October Glory, that has only the ever so slightest hint of reddish tinge in some of the leaves, but basically still looks lush and green.

Some of the street tree red maples are coloring, these are primarily 'Red Sunset' & should peak in about a week or so.

My seedling rubrum is turning orangish right now.

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 3:59PM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

Not allot going on here in way of color change. Sumac have just turned, and they are late. Dogwoods have turned, and are late. Autumn Blaze Maples are turning, but are late, but normal coloration. Some Sugar Maples are getting some color, and are a little late. At least the Sugar Maples are about typical in color. Already seeing tree defoliate without turning color, or much color. This way for Ash in particular, but also seeing some hickory not really doing much. Black Walnut was as yellow as you have ever seen last year (didn't know they could do that until last year), this year defoliated. Oaks aren't doing much, but some are defoliating. Was a warm early fall, but for the last 10 days or so we have had mostly cool nights and sunny days, but doesn't seem to have mattered much for whatever reason. Got the first frost (heavy at that) of the season yesterday morning with a temp probable right at 32, at my house yesterday (Sunday) morning. If that doesn't flip the color switch, then it's probable going to be a dud of a year for color locally.

Arktrees

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 4:28PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Interesting, Ark.

Most of the larger Black Walnuts are defoliated - due not to the fungal issues that typically plague them, but this "fall webworm" that ate them to nubs in August.

However, a few small Walnuts are a bright yellow - very nice.

We may get frost late this week. It was 38 this morning, and this next cold front is expected to be a good 7-10 degrees colder than the one that passed through Saturday.

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 4:52PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

If it makes anyone feel better I only have a few plants starting to color then only enjoyed some fall color from my red maples, the rest are completely green. Disappointing ecspeically when I focused all my decidious on fall color. Hey, but it happens.

I'm willing to bet this forecast will cause most plants to defoliate. Damn another year with no fall color on my Ginkgos!

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 5:48PM
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j0nd03

That is brutal with the plants still green, whaas =(

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 8:43PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Whaas, I remember one year when I lived in Akron, OH, we had low temps in the LOWER TEENS the first few days of November. While most of the really good color had passed, the oaks and Liriodendrons, as well as sweetgums, a few late-to-the-party sugar and red maples, & a few others, still looked great. Up to that point, it had been one of the longest-lasting and most vibrant fall color years I can remember.

The day after those temps the leaves were crispy, still sporting whatever color they were the night before.

Took them over a month to actually drop, though, even on trees that don't typically hold onto the dead leaves.

    Bookmark   October 21, 2013 at 11:17PM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

whaas, FWIW, we have gotten color out of our ginkgo 1 time (well into to November at that) since planting it May 2007. As of yesterday it was still a very dense dark green despite a heavy frost over the weekend. I definitely feel your pain on the Ginkgo.

As for the rest of your plants, it is my experience that few newly planted specimens will color properly for at least a year or two. The other thing is that I have noticed is late fertilizing of adjacent lawn seems to markedly inhibit color change.I fertilized our Bermuda lawn one year in August, as it had stopped growing, and was not very green. Late October rolls around, and everything around me has colored up...... but my trees are very green. Since then, I will not fertilize the lawn past mid June. Our trees have basically stopped growing by then anyway, so they would not benefit there either. Since doing so, my trees color change have timed as would be expected. This year, I fertilized in May, plus scattered compost, and that was all. Just beginning to get some color now, so will see what happens.

Arktrees

    Bookmark   October 22, 2013 at 12:09PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Saw a Quercus alba this morning that is already 80% turned in a nice deep red-pink. Quite early for an oak, and it's a fairly large tree.

I only hope it's not because the tree is dying or stressed. However, there aren't any dead branches I can see, and it's in an established neighborhood that hasn't had any construction for years.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2013 at 10:06AM
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aquilachrysaetos

Several of my Crapes are turning red. The one that typically shows the brightest red has not started to turn. My Columbia Plane turned gold and orange but has already dropped its leaves.

    Bookmark   October 25, 2013 at 2:48AM
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botann(z8 SEof Seattle)

Color is just starting in my garden. Seems a little late. We've had all day fog for days with the sun barely making an appearance in the late afternoon on some days.
Here's a Japanese Maple I grew from seed. I think it's now large enough to plant out next to some conifers. ;-)
Mike

    Bookmark   October 25, 2013 at 11:32AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Really popping the last few days.

Regarding my earlier post about oaks...an interesting development.

The white oaks are following through as expected overall, above-average color. The reds are better than I expected. While a lot did have a leaf scorch and defoliate early, there are a lot that did not. Not as many were affected by the scorch as I thought - when all the trees are green, you notice the ones turning brown more easily. The red oaks that did not lose leaves already look good. The Pins, Scarlets, Northern Reds all look good. Even a few Black oaks are showing color. The Willow Oaks are trending yellowish. Some of the Q. rubras have an almost Sugar Mapleesque coloration this year, red-orange outside, yellowish inside. The few Scarlets I've seen turning are so red they're almost PURPLE! The pins range from a nice bronze to red as well. There are definitely browns in the mix, and some still green, but it's looking better than I expected.

The Red maples, and to a lesser extent, some Sugars, are actually LATE to color, while the oaks are a bit early...so it's looking good.

I'll try to get some pics this weekend.

    Bookmark   October 31, 2013 at 1:30PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

To reply to some other posts:

We had a nice good freeze this past weekend - hit 30 at the airport, I think it was 29 at the nearest weatherbug station. Singed a few of the Catalpa and Paulownia leaves & knocked down a lot of annuals and veggies, but nothing else.

The Sweetgums are slowly moving along, but still looking good.

The cherries are nice orange this year - both the wild P. serotinas as well as a lot of the flowering/ornamentals.

Zelkovas are a nice burnt orange, but they're pretty consistently good here for color.

Most of the deciduous conifers are still green, but a Metasequoia on my street does have some color in the inner part of the canopy, just showing up the last few days.

A lot of the little elms along the roadsides are a decent yellow.

There's a Chestnut Oak I drive by every day that is about as yellow this year as the hickories, fairly unusual from my recollection.

My little Sweetgum is sloooooooowly turning, still don't know if it will end up with good color or not.

    Bookmark   October 31, 2013 at 1:41PM
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beng(z6 western MD)

Drove some the other day. Actually it was only slightly past peak of the general oak/hickory forest & still impressive. Lots of reds, oranges, orange-yellows, yellows and yellow-browns on the slopes and valleys.

Perhaps holding on to color alittle later than usual here -- first freezing spell came & went & now having some nice mild weather.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 9:04AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Some of the trees that have been turned a while dropped most leaves last night with the wind. Several of the sugar maples in my neighborhood, that were just past peak, but still looked good as recently as yesterday morning, are nearly bare today.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 9:21AM
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beng(z6 western MD)

***
Posted by arktrees 6b NW Arkansas (My Page) on
Mon, Oct 21, 13 at 16:28

Black Walnut was as yellow as you have ever seen last year (didn't know they could do that until last year), this year defoliated.
***

Seen this too (2002?) -- a rare yr when B walnuts hold their leaves & turn a gorgeous yellow. IIRC a dry second half of the summer is needed to prevent the late-summer anthracnose that usually defoliates it.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 11:18AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Yup - we had a dry late summer. A lot of the walnuts were defoliated by some webworm caterpillar, but the ones that weren't are a nice yellow.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 11:31AM
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Sequoiadendron4(6B)

The place I work has about 20 or so Acer Rubrums and they all look like they are on fire. Absolutely gorgeous right now. You can almost look out the window and watch them change. Earlier this week on Monday they barely had any color.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 12:24PM
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j0nd03

A couple lookers I saw while driving around at lunch today. Saw a humongous pistache that looked like a painting but traffic wouldn't allow a pic...

Sugar maple - saw some even prettier but couldn't get pics

Sweetgum

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 1:50PM
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j0nd03

Forgot one I took at home a couple days ago...

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 2:19PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Gorgeous sweetgum. I hate that it appears to have been 'topped' though. Granted, it could be storm damage, I've seen the leaders snap off in storms halfway down the trunk.

That sugar maple looks like a marketing photo from a nursery - amazing!

Our Sugars are mostly past peak here, but a few holdouts are just now turning nicely. The ones I presume to be seedling trees turn last, the cultivars (at least the most common, Legacy, Green Mountain especially) are generally mostly a bit earlier.

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 11:06PM
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deltaohio

Autumn Blaze Maple

    Bookmark   November 2, 2013 at 6:34AM
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gazania_gw

My October Glory Red Maple went from total green to this in 7 days.

    Bookmark   November 2, 2013 at 7:50AM
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subtropix

It is near peak color here now. Not so good in recent years though--freak snows, drought, too warm, monsoon rains, hurricanes, etc.. Here is my Dawn Red earlier.

    Bookmark   November 2, 2013 at 5:07PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

It seems the later a tree starts to turn, the faster it happens when it does.

Some of the earlier ones take MONTHS to fully change over, while the later arrivals take under a week.

    Bookmark   November 2, 2013 at 11:16PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

A few pics for your viewing pleasure, taken in Howard County, MD Nov 2 & 3 unless indicated otherwise:

First, some Sugar Maples:

Some Red Maples:

A nice laceleaf Acer palmatum of some sort:

Some Oaks (mostly Q. alba):


(couple Hickories and Tuliptrees in this one too)


(Love this one - I think it's a Q. rubra sapling)

Sweetgums:

Crapemyrtle:

Some more at my Photobucket page. Click on any pic & you can scroll the whole album.

There are some nice Scarlet oaks around, but I couldn't get a decent picture today or yesterday, either due to lighting or that I'd have had to park the car and stroll onto private property to get a good picture.

    Bookmark   November 3, 2013 at 9:41PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Ginkgos:

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 7:40AM
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beng(z6 western MD)

hair, nice pics. The "Q rubra sapling" looks like scarlet oak. Not sure Q rubra ever gets that scarlet-red -- more pure red at most.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 8:24AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Thanks, beng.

I'm pretty sure it's rubra, or maybe velutina, despite the color. The leaves are larger & don't have the deep lobes of Q. coccinea.

To be fair, I didn't get out of the car, this stand of trees was in the back of an industrial park, and I was able to drive all the way back, open the window, and snap the pic. However, the leaves were shaped like "textbook" Northern Red Oak.

I did see some nice, deep scarlet LARGE scarlet oaks, but none I could get a good picture of. There are even more I see on my drive to work, as well as some better White Oak specimens, but again, I'm driving on the highway, and can't really get pics in the morning on the way to work, as I never have the extra time to take detours or stop...and with the end of DST, it's now going to be too dark when I drive home.

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 9:16AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Here's a White Oak I saw today at lunch - hacked by the power company, but still nice - not the reddest I've seen by far, but the best close-up I could get:

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 1:53PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Let's try that again:

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 2:01PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)


Hickory


Better one of the Ginkgos

White Oak - love the rootflare on this tree!


Baldcypress

    Bookmark   November 4, 2013 at 11:05PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

I like the maples that show variation in their color. A little more interesting than one shade.
This one is a selected seedling of mine.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 11:15AM
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j0nd03

Mike, you need a blog. Seriously. =)

And why the name change?

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 11:25AM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

The name change is a result of me being hacked. Caused me all sorts of problems. I'm in favor of the death penalty for hackers.;-)

A blog sounds good. I will look into it.
I used to have my pictures on Webshots, but since they shot themselves in the foot I've been trying to find the time to get on another picture hosting site.
I'm retired and busier than ever. Time management is not one of my skills. I figure I have the time to do it all, and at the end of the day, all I've done is a lot of little things without the main goal being accomplished. Well, there's always tomorrow.
Mike.....

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 11:47AM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

All, thanks for taking the time to post some pics. There are plenty of beauties there.

I might post some but its be a combination of not getting pics in time or just general poor fall color, mainly due to a string of low 20s a couple weeks back.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 1:21PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

That deep scarlet little oak may indeed be a Quercus coccinea, Scarlet Oak - I've looked at more online pictures, and there seems to be enough variation in leaf morphology among the species that it could fit. I always presume Scarlet Oak leaves to look like slightly larger Pin Oak leaves with slightly different sinuses, but some pics online look intermediate between Pin and Northern Red oak, so this tree could, indeed, be a Scarlet. Maybe I'll try this week to go again and get some closeup leaf pics.

Theoretically, since Q. rubra does hybridize with Q. coccinea, it would be possible it could be a natural hybrid, too.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 2:32PM
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hortster(6a, southcentral KS)

Don't forget Nyssa! Dependable every single year...
hortster

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 3:24PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Gorgeous!

Our Nyssas for the most part have defoliated.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 3:47PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

I wish I had one.
What conditions do they like?
I may hafta order one.
Mike.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2013 at 6:50PM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

Mike,
Blackgum Nyssa sylvatica (the species seen most often) is a very adaptable tree. It is very common in the Ozark Plateau where I live. It grows wild on fairly wet sites (i.e.next to but not in a stream or pond etc), but it also grows on fairly dry upland sites as well. Dry tolerance is probable due to the production of a tap root. Might need a couple deep waterings in your dry summer climate, over a high water table, or plant near consistent water. Doesn't have serious pest of insect problems, but can get leaf spot late in the year. The cultivar Red Rage is denser green and has much less leaf spot. Red color is enhanced by more sun, but the tree is happy with partial sun. Our seed grown tree grows approx 18"/year in poor soil. Oh and they are later to leaf out in spring. Moderate sized at full maturity. Typically ~40' locally. Some smaller, some larger.

Arktrees

    Bookmark   November 7, 2013 at 10:12AM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

Thank you Ark. The information is much appreciated.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 7, 2013 at 10:25PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Mike are you sure you didn't plant one and forget about it? You have everything in that retreat of yours!

Nyssa must really dislike neutral sandy soils. I've actually had better luck with Japanese Maples.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2013 at 11:02PM
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mikebotann(8a SE of Seattle)

Naw, I've never even seen one for sale around here. I don't haunt the nurseries like I used to though. bboy or GardenGirl might have some info as far as local availability.
I do have a couple of Oxydendrum arboreums though. One grew big and busted off at the stump from ice and the other never has done well. Time for it to move....again. I see them around once in awhile, but not very often.
Mike

    Bookmark   November 8, 2013 at 12:30AM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

Mike,
Got to recommend you give Blackgum a try. Not hard to come by online, and our native Blackgum at peak color are absolutely amazingly bright red. We also have native as well as cultivated Sugar Maples (they are every bit as colorful here as the Northest, just not as many), and the Blackgums are every bit a match.

Arktrees

    Bookmark   November 8, 2013 at 9:49AM
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j0nd03

Also, blackgums have a very long fall show that can last for a couple weeks. There are a couple near my work that have been colored up for about that long and are still intense =)

    Bookmark   November 8, 2013 at 1:53PM
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hortster(6a, southcentral KS)

This one is 'Autumn Brilliance.' Someone chose the right name! It has been a beautiful fall in this area.
hortster

    Bookmark   November 8, 2013 at 2:21PM
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j0nd03

Lucky you hortster! The two at my house turned a pale yellow orange and quickly dropped afterwards. Our fall has been a big bust with a few exceptions.

This post was edited by j0nd03 on Fri, Nov 8, 13 at 14:39

    Bookmark   November 8, 2013 at 2:29PM
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j0nd03

Sugar maple in NWA this weekend below. Boy is it a shame GW po'd Arktrees. It may have been past peak, but man o man where there some stunners up there begging to be photographed and posted here!

Don't forget to right click and "view image" as with all my pics =)

    Bookmark   November 11, 2013 at 3:42PM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

It's those dam* principles getting in the way again. ;-)

Arktrees

    Bookmark   November 12, 2013 at 8:33AM
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toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)

Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip tree at my neighbor's. Most years it has pretty similar fall color. If space allows it is going to be a sight to behold at 80 foot across.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2013 at 12:48AM
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toronado3800 Zone 6 StLouis(6)

My Metasequoia Ogon and the neighbor's Acer saccharum , sugar maple.

I can almost never set up a good shot there, too much clutter, whatever that purple seeded bean vine is frosted to death, it just seems busy. Looks better reflected from the roof of my mustang.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2013 at 12:57AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Our sugars are all defoliated save for just a few. The A. rubrums in the woods are mostly bare, but the cultivars (esp. October Glory) are hanging on to some nice color. The Liriodendrons are bare. Even some of the oaks are now dropping - the color was good but short lived this year on the oaks.

Some Sweetgums are holding on nicely, but this morning, I noticed they (as well as some maples and others) seem to have some freeze damage to the leaves now after 2 mornings in the low to mid 20s.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2013 at 9:19AM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

Was an excellent year for fall color of Tulip Trees locally. The nicest yellow that I have seen from them in several years. This is one tree that I personally think very highly of whether it colors well in the fall or not. Probable because it's a bit different than most other large trees. There are lots of Oaks, Maples, etc, but only one Tulip Tree.

Side note. It has long been thought that Tulip Tree was a member of the Magnolia family. Some recent genetic analysis shows that they have been distinct for a very long time. Turns out they are not a Magnolia at all.

Arktrees

    Bookmark   November 14, 2013 at 9:29AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

I love Tuliptree/Yellow Poplar/etc.

So HUGE, so outstanding. Most of the tallest trees in our woods locally are Lirodendrons. Usually a good 10-20 feet taller than the oaks that typically accompany them. There are several around here that are easily 130 feet tall.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2013 at 2:42PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

A casual glance outdoors reveals a much more winter-like scene now, as we're 90% defoliated overall.

Some color still remains though. A lot of the street trees are Acer rubrum 'October Glory' & various Pyrus calleryana, both of which mostly still have leaves, but past-peak in color. There are also some Scarlet Oaks that still look outstanding - one in particular I'll try to get a picture of tomorrow morning (I go into work at 10:30 so should have good lighting for a pic) - it's a youngish tree, still pyramidal shaped & branched to the ground, but has a very intense, and late developing color every year. From the car I'd guess it's about 10" caliper, so it's no sapling, but not big enough to develop the spreading, mature form yet.

Some of the later-coloring Acer rubrum cultivars (some Red Sunset but mostly October Glory) still look great, but the seedling rubrums (wild or planted) are long bare at this point. A few sweetgums are holding on, but mostly drying out and dropping. The white oaks have some leaves, but mostly the browned, dried up ones that hang on most of the winter. Same for the pins. The N. Red oaks are mostly bare or nearly so. Beeches are bare. Liriodendrons are bare. The deciduous conifers are peaking or a bit past now - I'll try to snap some pics of a couple nice Metasequoia tomorrow as well. The Callery pears are average this year. Sugar Maples pretty much defoliated.

Some of the Sawtooth Oaks have a nice yellow that is just now developing - these typically stay green until sometime between Nov. 15 & December 1, then normally just turn a weak chartreuse & drop, but this year some actually seem to be turning a good yellow. We'll see what happens -they're my least favorite oak (invasive, not particuarly attractive) but this might redeem them for me temporarily.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 9:26AM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Larch in protected areas are the only plant hanging onto a small bit of color. Pear in some cases as well.

Sugar maples and ash defoliated well over a month ago. Most oak defoliated a couple weeks ago.

There was that one week in mid October that just ruined fall color, ecspecially in my garden. 75% of my plants held on to brown leaves until the other day when those 50+mph winds whipped through.

This is the first year in 8 years I have nothing to show for with the expection of my Fall Fiesta Sugar Maple.

Til next year!

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 10:13AM
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arktrees(6b NW Arkansas)

Ok whaas,
JUST FOR YOU. :-)

This is our Fall Fiesta Sugar Maple near peak color. Just before hitting absolute peak, dry high winds took some of the color from drying out leaves, and then took some of the leaves. I will leave these pics up for a few days, then break the links just like I have done with my posted pics from the past.

Arktrees

Leaf close up on the north shady side of the tree.

Near peak color on a sunny day.

Just past peak color after the high dry win had worked on it a while.

For comparison sake. This is the very same tree a few minutes before I planted it 6 (six) years before almost to the exact date. It has grown well.

This post was edited by arktrees on Tue, Nov 19, 13 at 13:20

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 1:06PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Nice color, Ark. That's turning into quite the nice tree.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 2:09PM
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whaas_5a(5A SE WI)

Real nice, sometimes you have bend your own rules!

This is all I have!

Massive Katsura that was just beginning to turn very late. Typically they defoliate early here. I still can't believe how big this thing is for my area.

Another Katsura in the same park same time.

This sugar maple near a lake turned very very late compared to all other sugar maples in the area.

An unknown Red Maple cultivar in my yard. Turned super early since its a dry spot.

My Fall Fiesta Sugar Maple. Stood up to a week long of low 20s to then peak late October. A truly amazing cultivar. The Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum next to it stood up well too. Very very dark burgundy this year.
Maple is ~20' tall. Took the pic from inside so I had to zoom.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 7:48PM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)

Posting from work...let's hope this works. I got some pics this morning. THE Scarlet Oak was obstructed by a big truck, but the one I did get was pretty nice. Some browning near the lower branches, but still pretty nice-the pics do not do it justice.


A decent Quercus coccinea (Scarlet Oak)...was better a few days ago.


Nice Acer rubrum hanging on to strong color


Nice Specimen of Metasequoia

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 10:59AM
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hairmetal4ever(Z7 MD)



Quercus acutissima-Sawtooth Oaks-nice color for them


The deepest purple Sweetgum I have ever seen

    Bookmark   November 20, 2013 at 3:51PM
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ttonk(OH 6A)

Loving this thread.

    Bookmark   November 26, 2013 at 12:23AM
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