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Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Posted by lmadsen10 (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 17, 07 at 16:14

Hi,
I have posted before on the juniper bonsai tree that I got over Christmas. For right now I have to keep it indoors, but it is getting pretty good sunlight right next to a window. I hope to eventually move it outdoors once I get out of my apartment. My question now is about watering. When I first got the tree, I was watering it basically everyday since that's what the instruction sheet said to do. I have since read on these message boards that I should not water it that much. So, I cut back to watering it 1-2 times a week. I would let the soil get dry and then water it. I have recently begun to notice though that there are a few spots of browning needles and branches so I started to water it a little more (2-3 times a week). When I was trimming off some of the browning branches I also noticed that there were a lot of loose and dry needles within the tree that would fall off when I gently moved them. The majority of my tree however looks green and healthy. My question is, how often should I water my bonsai? I've been paying attention to the moisture in the soil and it always seems moist. I was thinking about perhaps getting new soil and repotting the plant as well. Would that help? Thanks a lot for any advice.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

The browning needles are telling you the soil is staying soggy below the surface between waterings (it's probably mostly peaty potting soil and death to junipers even though they're all planted in it unless you bought it at a nursery in a regular nursery pot). Your mix needs to be just about soil-less, certainly peat-less, and mostly grit, bark and a little perlite. And even in that fast draining mix you need to let it almost all get dry between waterings, though if you're in the SW and it's summer, you'd do it more often. And yes, give it every ounce of light you can dredge up!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I think I may have discovered why my Juniper Bonsai is loosing needles. I was looking through a Bonsai book that I had and it talked about a fungal disease called "rust". Except in the book it talked about rust on the leaves of a deciduous type bonsai not a conifer one. Also, my rust appears to be on the top of the soil and on the roots that are exposed from the soil (the root ball is it called?). What I have on my roots appears to be exactly what is in the book shown on leaves. Has anyone ever heard of rust on the roots of a bonsai and what is the best way to remedy it? Thanks a lot for your help!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

It is highly unlikely that the little juniper 'mall-sai' you got in a store has rust. What you're seeing is classic for them - sold with one-size-fits-all care tags, covered with glued on pebbles and/or moss, instructions to water by immersing them in the sink once a week or more, and to keep them in indirect lighting. They might as well just sell them with little tree coffins! Juniper belong in a proper mix, outdoors in full sun (what seems bright indoors is very dull to a plant compared to outdoors even in what looks to be dull to us there), and to be watered when more than less of the mix is dry, though even if it rains your tree will survive because the right mix drains immediately and only a very little bit of water is held by the particles, but evenly throughout. A browning juniper with rigid foliage sold as above is almost certainly a victim of indoor lighting, a bad 'soil' mix and much too frequent watering, and will look rusty, but has probably been treated with chemicals prior to sale which would make 'rust' almost impossible under the conditions it's been grown in or in your home.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Hi Lucy, thanks for your response(s). The bonsai that I have is one that was ordered online from joebonsai.com. It is a really nice looking, large (not to mention expensive) bonsai that seems to be planted in a very good mix of soil. It said in the pamphlet I got with it that the soil is a special mix which drains very quickly. So, does that change any of your thoughts on the possible rust around the roots? I think you're exactly right that it needs to be outdoors so just yesterday I moved it to my girlfriend's deck where it should get plenty of sunshine. Are there any other considerations that I should be wary of now that I have moved it outdoors? It has been planted in the same soil ever since we got it in the mail last Christmas (and probably for a while before that while it was at Joe Bonsai's). Should I think about re-potting it? A local nursery has a bonsai tree mix that they sell. Also, the deck is not covered at all so I was wondering if it should be brought indoors during one of the many severe storms (heavy downpours) that we get in here in Nebraska. Thanks again for your advice!

-Lars


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Lars:

Junipers LOOOVE full sun, but I would be wary of having it get shocked/sunburned after having been in a dim indoors, and suddenly get a complete OD of sunshine. I would introduce it slowly - an hour outdoors in the sun the first day, two the next, 3 the day after that, etc until it is fine outdoors all day.

If the mix is fast draining, you shouldn't have to worry about your downpours, just back off a bit on your manual watering if it has gotten rained upon.

Is your plant putting out bright new growth? (It should be at this time of year). Any dead foliage should be pinched out without harming these new growths.

The way to tell if you need to repot is to gently lift the tree and its roots out of the pot. If you can see only roots going round and round, it is in need of a repotting, if you can see soil and the roots don't fill the pot its probably OK where it is for now. The main repotting season is over in most of the US, so unless it is absolutely chock full of roots, I would wait until next year in the late winter to repot.

There are other opinions out there, just putting in my two cents :-) Best of Luck with the Juniper. BTW could you share a photo (that helps in assessing it's status too)??

Bruce


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Thanks for the tips and info Bruce, I really appreciate it. I will try to post a picture soon. There is just a little bright new growth but that happened a month ago or so. After it has been outside for a while, I am going to re-asses the health of some of its branches and prune/pinch out where I see fit. Thanks again!

-Lars


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Hi

Just searching online for some help with my bonsai. Looks like our trees have the same thing. I got mine from Joebonsai and im finding the same thing. I am just starting to introduce my bonsai to the fertilizer provided by the starter kit and am starting to see new growth (weirdly, on the side facing away from the window). However, the rest of the tree is very dry, with pieces breaking off even with a light touch, and i water it everyday. I even have started putting it in a sink with a couple inches in water to ensure its not drying out. The soil looks moist most of the time.

I live in northern Canada, so outside isnt an option right now (were getting hail as we speak), but are there any other options?

Thanks,
Diane


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Dozer... your tree is likely dead. Once pieces break off, unless the rest of the foliage is green, soft and very pliable, it's probably gone. Even if you couldn't put it outdoors, a cool and very well ventilated place with good light would have been a good idea, but your daily watering is what did it in (if it's gone). Read the rest of this thread (and the thousands of others all over the web about J. procumbens) and see that watering too often is what kills them all the time. They are not house plants. They are trees native to high, dry, windy places and they grow in sandy gritty stuff that water runs right through - when it rains, which may not be for a long time. The soil looking moist most of the time is not a good thing - it's probably crummy potting stuff full of water hogging peat, and that just never dries well once wet and roots just rot and rot.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Well that totally sucks. I wish I had found this site sooner. I guess my bonsai is dead too. On the paper I got with it said to water it daily. The foliage on mine isnt really brown but its falling out and very dry feeling, unless I spray it up to 3 times a day. I live in TX so its pretty hot here. Have Any tip on how to save my bonsai? Oh and I have been keeping mine indoors because it was drying out so fast when I would put it outside. I moved it back outside today though. Any help? Thanks.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

what seems bright indoors is very dull to a plant compared to outdoors even in what looks to be dull to us there

Lucy, you are absolutely right. I've told tons of people that just because it "looks bright" doesn't mean it is - I usually show them with a footcandle reader that their "bright spot" indoors that doesn't get direct sun registers maybe 300 foot-candles and a north facing wall outdoors is 2200 on a sunny day and 800 even on a cloudy day!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

yea well i serached for many web sites to help me with my juniper bonsai and none helped andd now i found this one at first my bonsai tree was fine i sprayed on it every day so it get's humidity and it was inside and it was on the sun, tehn it started to get worse it started to dry up so later i placed it outside it seemed to get better but then it just got worse a big part id say started to dry up so i watered it and the soil was never dry like in the one it would die so later i repoted it with some soil from the forest that my mom had in the basement. The soil was realy good and broken up by the worms inside the bag and before i repoted it i checked for any insect that may harm my tree so there werent any later it started to sprout new branches but they kept on daying of and i dont know waht to do please help me im just 14 and my mom knows alot about plants but not about this tree and tell my how i can post the pictures of it from before and after.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Junipers need... to live outside where you live, all year round. They also need to be planted either in the ground (best bet), or in a proper 'bonsai' mix, which means forget 'soil' as you know it, and think grit... whether chicken grit from a farm 'Feed' store, or crushed lava rock (only a bonsai or good gardening store would have that), or smallish gravel for aquariums (good bet and easier to find) making up about 60-70% of the whole mix, along with a little Perlite (comes in a bag at Wal-Mart, a lot of supermarkets, any garden centre), and some small bark bits (1/16") or bark mulch. All mixed up well, with no separate layer of anything on the bottom, but 1-2 good sized (at least 1/2") drain holes on the bottom, which you cover with 'plastic canvas' from either Wal-Mart (craft section) or anywhere that sells needlework/tapestry supplies. Then you will have a fast draining mix that won't rot roots when you water your tree, or if it rains. You may THINK your tree is 'drying' because it browns and foliage gets brittle, but in fact watering too often for the crappy soil it came in originally is the problem. Either plant your tree in the ground for now (1-2 yrs) or plant it properly in a mix like the above one, and then only water when more of the mix is dry than less of it. It's NOT a house plant that needs watering 'every Friday" or anything like it.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

K thanku but i still dont get what gritle means waht its like sand


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Grit, for our purposes, is bigger than sand.
Imagine the small bits of crushed gravel that you'd see on the roadside...1/16 to 1/8 of an inch.

Josh


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

k thanku but how do u post pictures here


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

The easiest way to post pics is to use a free online photo-hosting service, such as photobucket. If you search these Forums - "How to post pictures" - you'll find many helpful threads.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

k thanks


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need help on planting my juniper bonsai into the ground

can i get a pot with soil and put the tree in it and then plant it into the ground with the pot so the roots dont spread to far or should i hjust plant it normaly and can i just plant it into the ground for 3 moths while i go to ukraine and then when i come back plant it into my pot


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Plant it normally (no pot) and dig it up NEXT SPRING (it'll have gotten a fatter trunk by then, and be in the right season for digging - summer is the worst time).


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

o okay thanks but how do i dig it up with out cuting the roots


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will it freze during winter

my mom is woring that it might freze during the winter and is there some special things that i have to do before planting it into the ground and what about the insects can they do something to my tree while its in the ground my mom plant alot of floweres and roses around so should i wory about the bugs or that the sun dosent shine on it?


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

It's a juniper - it can take some extreme conditions.

Outdoors, natural predators (birds, mantis, spiders, others) will help to control insect problems. Don't worry.

In the Spring, when you dig the plant up, you will cut some roots to get it out of the hole. Again, don't let that worry you now. Spring's a long way off...with the first day of Summer on Friday ;)

Josh


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waht to do with bonsai during winter

k thanku


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

When you dig it, you don't do it right at the trunk, no more than you would have planted that way. You plant the whole rootball, no deeper than it's planted in the pot (that part's important), and don't let your mother tell you to make a "little well" (depression) around it to catch water, as she might do for her flowers. Trees are different. When you dig it up, do so out from the tree, around where the rootball came to or a bit further out.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Along a similar note, I have a San Jose Juniper that is most likely suffering a similar problem... Over watering due to poor potting medium. I've had this juniper for 3+ years in Florida and, it has grown surprisingly well in Miracle Grow Potting Soil. But, it sounds like this soil, that I have been using, is retaining too much moisture.

My question is, if I have recently repotted this juniper (within 3-4 months), would it be safe to repot in mid-summer and place it into aquarium rocks, perlite, and bark? Or should i ride it out for another year etc. and let the juniper stay where it is. I will take a pic of it and post it tonight. The tree still has lots of fresh green growth and decent back budding from mild pinching of buds. But, in comparison to a healthy juniper in a nursery it looks much less green and happy.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Repotting midsummer is tree-icide, wait til it's dormant in November.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

wait what u mean i dont get the tree iced ? is it like frozen or something and wich november after this sumer or the one after the next summer the 2009 one


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I mean that any tree that lives outdoors in the northern hemisphere goes dormant in winter (takes a long, cold rest to renew itself for spring) and stops growing. The 'stop' is gradual, from about Oct. through to late Jan/Feb., when it then begins the slow coming out of dormancy for spring (even if it still seems cold and snowy and all that depending how far north you are). By March, while many trees still seem to be frozen into the ground, the longer hours of daylight and slightly warmer temps have begun to wake the trees up. What you need to do in Nov. (NOT e.g. Sept. or something - the idea is not to keep the tree's soil from freezing) to help your tree get through the winter nicely is put the pot into one quite a bit larger, one that has its own drain holes (for melting snow, etc.) and fill the space between your pot and the large one with mulch to help keep the roots themselves from becoming TOO cold for too long, even if the soil around them is frozen. And if you let it snow on the tree it also helps to insulate it which is ok. And of course I mean the Nov. ('08) which is coming up... why would you think I meant '09?


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winter for juniper

i dont know im just like that . okay bt now since it dont snow basicaly at all in clifton do i still have to do the mulch thing or cani just leave it in the ground


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Kostyantyn, I think Lucy's latest answer was directed to djjin14568 above. This November, after this summer.

As to your question about repotting - it means that Repotting in summer is tree-murder.

Josh


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Winter

What I should also mention is that once the soil in the pot is frozen (goes hard) stop watering until it is completely thawed (unfrozen) in spring... maybe March sometime. Also, you may wonder about trees in Forida or Texas, but even if they don't actually freeze for more than a few nights over a few weeks, they still will be dormant and still need the 'outdoor' cycle of changes.


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Summer

If the tree is in the ground (NO pot) then NO mulch of course. BTW, my answer was to Kost...


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RE: Juniper Bonsai

Sorry about that, I should have checked the time sig to see how recently you'd replied!

Carry on! ;)


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I have one that's browning, but I have it in a proper soil mix, Water it generally, three times a week at most, and have it outside in full sun. What could be the problem? It's not a cheap tree, I got it from a member of my Bonsai group and it is 12 years old, I'm very worried.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Hi, well what I'm reading is a) good - as far the 'proper' (?) soil mix goes, but b) maybe not so good, because you're apparently watering it to a schedule, and that's a no-no as you really need to water only when it's necessary and with a juniper, depending on what that mix is and the pot itself, it may well be too often. Junipers grow naturally in high, windy, dry places where it may not rain for ages, and you have to learn to judge how often to water, and never just do it the way you would for a house plant. HOWever, if that's not the problem, have you checked for spider mites?


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I haven't. What I mean is the I water when the soil is dry, so except of in the driest weather (which we have a ton of Humidity in NC) I would NEVER water it more than three times a week. Proper soil is well, exactly the soil conditions you have described above, more or less. I will check for spider mites but I don't think that's it. Thanks, and any more help would be fantastic!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Do you check below the surface to see if the mix is still moist, vs only on the surface?


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

most of the time, I don't wanna break any roots though. It's not so root bound that its a problem, but I'm gunna trim them in November [Better time you have in mind?]


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Okay the leaves are now more yello than a light deadish brown, normally that would worry me but at least it's alive


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

If the foliage is green and soft, it's great, if it's brittle and hard in most places, the tree's been gone for a while (just slow to show it).


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

its brown and yellow slowly regaining some green, and more or less soft (not squishy or rotted)


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

still no real green. any thoughts?


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Yes, post a picture. The doctor needs to see the patient...

Josh


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

This is all very useful information. I've been working on my juniper bonsai for a while now and had some of the same questions. Thank you all for the helpful information.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Junipers however, are very adaptable plants. They will aclimatize to a variety of conditions, Lucy however, is dead on in most of her information.

I will take this a little further:
Good bonsai soil, for almost any tree, is loose and can be fairly coarse. The two main reasons a tree is repotted are, becoming rootbound--which can cause a multitude of problems and the degredation of the soil mix which will cause the pot to begin to stop draining well. Yes there are other reasons as well as everyone knows.

If the soil mix is right, when it's soaking wet, you should be able to close you fist around it--hold it tight for about 30 seconds then open your hand. It should fall apart. If the pot and the soil are right you should be able to literally pour water on it, the water should percolate right through.
This is why you can water every day and should.

Yes, you check the soil moisture by really sticking your finger into it, much better than just guessing or using some kind of an insturment. Bonsai is a very tactile thing. You actually do things like touch the tree and the soil...oh my!!

The answers to the two other questions are the ones we've all learned over time:
Prune: when the shears are sharp.
Re-pot: when you have the time.
Yes it's normally better in the early spring but, I have done it in 100 degree weather. How you treat it after makes the difference.


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help with venus flytrap !!

okay so my mom got me a venus flytrap wich i asked her for like 5 months and basicaly i have no idea how to take care of it. on the back of the container ting it has writen that i have to keep it moist and to rop out the black ones like the dead heads, i dont trust it so help me here are some pics and help tell me anything that would be usfull information for me.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Photobucket


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Kosta - post this on the House Plants forum of GW and start a NEW thread - this one's OLD and it's for bonsai, not fly-eating plants!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Hi everyone,

I live In Vancouver, Canada and I have bought my Shimpaku juniper from my local bonsai nursery (Sunny Bonsai). I have been reading about the "bark test" where you scratch the bark and if it's green then it's alive, but my bonsai's bottom quarter of the the trunk is white when I scratched it while the the upper half is still green , but a light green. The foliage seems OK to me; it's not exactly soft nor is it hard, so I would say its in between?There are some dead foliage, but it's very very minor (probably about 2-3 tiny pieces). A tiny bit of the foliage does fall of when I touch it hard but it's very few, and most stay intact. I water it when it feels dry (I use the finger method, so no watering routine). The soil is good soil for evergreens, so it should be fine. I Keep it outdoors all the time on my patio, but it gets very very hot sometimes. Is it because of the hot/weather (It's around 97 F for the past two weeks) thats causing it to die? Is this bark test really valid?


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One more thing

Oh and the foliage is green; it doesnt "look" dead or anything. There really is no signs of death other then the bark test. But I've heard that sometimes Junipers takes up to 6 weeks to show death? I really don't want this to die. I've spent nearly $400 dollars on this baby.

Dave


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I hope that you all can give me some input about my Juniper Bonsai that I have received this past Christmas as a gift from my sister. I usually water it 1-2 times per week and I keep it in my window that gets extreme direct sunlight to it. Just recently with all of this cold weather my window sillhas been getting probably a cold little draft. Well it looked fine last week then when I was watering it today, well the pines were hard as can be and fell off when I touch them. They were so hard to the touch that they would actually stick in my hand instead of falling down. The appearance however is a light green with a touch of yellow. Please help me by giving me some input and advice if it is not a goner.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 13, 11 at 10:42

By the time a juniper gets to that point, it's usually long past viable. ;-(

You don't say where you live, so I can't guess at what type of over-wintering would be appropriate for your little bonsai juniper, but they honestly don't like being indoors at all. They want (need) to be cold all winter long - like buried in the ground outdoors (the pot) and mulched if it gets really cold where you are, or in an unheated garage ........ I'm really sorry that, from the sound if it, your plant might be gone, but you can always try another. Please don't give up - with a little effort, you can learn to be proficient at tending a variety of trees in little pots.

Al


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

bought my juniper summer 2YRs ago staid outdoors was fine till about march this year, started seeing some brown, been on covered deck, put in brightsun 1 day got sunburned, took to bonsai nursery repotted,watering 2 to 3 times a week getting browner all the time what to do, please help its 16YRS old bought from old korean man who does nothing but bonsai soil should be right


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

PEOPLE! Junipers are not house plants. They will not survive indoors. And yes they can be repotted in summer. Junipers have TWO growing seasons. One spurt in spring and another in early fall. Once temps get up into the 80's, daily watering becomes necessary no matter what the humidity of the air, that is if you have them in the right potting mix to start with. It's all about drainage. You want a bonsai mix that drains quickly. Even if it means watering sometimes twice a day during hot weather.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I just bought a Juniper bonsai about two months ago and it is dying, the leaves are slowly getting brown. I do know for a fact that I have been watering it too much and am now watering it less. It lives indoors in a window right now and I was wondering what to do because I live in Arizona at 7000 ft above sea level and I am a little worried to put my bonsai outside because of how close that would put it to the sun. Should I moving outside anyways? or just water it less? The instructions say to have it in direct sun and filtered afternoon sun, they also say that if you live in a desert you should keep the plant inside during the day and outside at night, if that helps.


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Dry after week and branch loss

My Bonsai has never been outside since I got her in May. She sits in an indirect light corner in my bedroom near an open windowl. She has grown well and getting fluffy. Then I went away for a week and she was dry and to touch needles and some branches popped off. Her limbs are still flexiable midway. The tip popped off today and more branches. I have to leave again for a week and need to prevent further damage. I soaked her today and have been spraying her daily. What should I do before leaving in 2 days? HELLLLLLLLLLPPPPPPP!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

im a newbie regarding bonsai... i just bought mine last 2 weeks ago.. im in Los Angeles CA and i would like to know how often should i water my plant?! and i believe misting the leaves every other day is good?! and about our temperature here in Los Angeles get atleast 50 degree fahrenheit. so should i leave it outside my balcony or bring it inside my apartment at night?! please help me... and should i give them a fertilizer this month?! if yes how often?! and last thing 2 weeks ago it has moss but right now its dried so how would i grow the moss back?? PLEASEEE HELPPPPP MEEEEEE!!


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I recently purchased a small Juniper bonsai (About a week ago) I have been placing it on my balcony which receives direct sunlight until about 11am and then indirect sunlight the rest of the day. I live in south Florida where is is very humid. My question is should I re-pot the juniper in new soil. From what I have read they normally sell these bonsai in poor soil (Water retaining peat) that holds to much water and can cause the plant to die. I have been keeping a close eye on the plant and noticed that the very tips of some of the foliage are brown (very small piece at the ends nothing easily seen). My questions are will I have problems with this juniper given the placement on the balcony that i described? Should i change the soil to something more permeable? and lastly should I prune these very small browning areas off? How can i mimic a dormancy period because the winters here rarely fall below 60 degrees and i have read that dormancy is crucial for bonsai survival. also i received fertilizer with the plant. should i fertilize immediately or wait a month. and how often should i re-fertilize. Thank you


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

To Kogski - without knowing what kind of tree or shrub it is, I can't possibly help... sorry!

Alexrd - How often does it get watered and how much - that's probably the most important thing... browning in a juniper can certainly mean it's being watered too often, and is on it's way out. Brown near the lower trunk is just shedding of old needles, but at the tips is not a good sign... is the foliage still soft and pliable, or has it gone stiff? Stiff is bad... but don't prune anything right now. You can't really mimic dormancy unfortunately... watering less often right now could help, but depending on other factors, your tree may not be long for this world... get back with answers please.

This post was edited by moochinka on Sat, Oct 4, 14 at 22:29


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

I watered it once since I purchased it using the bottom watering or soaking method at opposed to the top watering method. I have only had it for a week. The branches are all still soft and pliable. Could the browning be a result of shipping? Do you recommend changing the soil. I have attached a picture of the browning that I am talking about.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Also is my region going to be a problem. temperatures in the summer can go as high as 100 degrees F. and our winters are very mild rarely under 60 degrees. given these environmental conditions what are you recommendations for making my bonsai not only survive but thrive. Here is a picture of my plants soil.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Hi, if the pebbles on top go all the way through, the mix is very good. And I don't really see any brown at the tips to speak of, nothing like what I expected, which is good! Water when most of the mix is dry, it can take a bit of 'too much' dryness than it can too much wetness, and you have a lot of humidity there relative to the high, dry places it's native to. In summer, keep it out of the 90-100 F. heat at midday for a few hours, but also use something light colored to shield the pot so roots don't cook. No one can predict the future, but you might just be ok... it's so early after all since getting the tree - come back in a few months to let us know how it's doing.


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

Thanks for the advice. What should I do about winter and dormancy period? should i just keep it outside? I have read that people place them in the refrigerator for a couple of months to mimic winter and initiate the dormancy period before spring


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RE: Juniper Bonsai Too Dry?

You can't do anything about dormancy where you are except to lessen (by a fair amount) the frequency (not necessarily amt) of watering from now thru Jan/Feb. depending on how your tree appears to react. I don't recommend the fridge (or freezer!) because even very experienced growers have trouble regulating moisture, mold, etc. After all, junipers do grow in the SW at times, so heat alone isn't the only factor.


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