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Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

Posted by Daisy_head_maisy 6 (My Page) on
Wed, Sep 14, 05 at 1:42

Hi. Sorry to sound dumb, I've googled and can't find the answers I need so I turned here.

I bought a bag of gorgeous anemone coronarias at costco. Looking online for planting instructions I have found that they are hardy to zone 10 or zone 8 or zone 6! SO, which one is right?

What kind of soil do they like? Are they hard to grow? WIll they multiply like my daffodils?

Thanks so much for any info you can give me on these. I planted a bag of ranunculus I bought from them in the spring and they all died when they were about 5" tall... don't want another let down.

If these won't come back every year, then I'll have to take them back. We are zone 6 but I have some callas near my home that have come back for 4 summers now, I could plant them in the same area?

Daisy


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

They're definitely hardy in zone 9.

My soil is a clay loam which has had regular additions of compost and grit. Occasionally I add gypsum or dolomite, or lime powder as my soil is naturally acidic.

For me, Anemones do best in full sun with the 'bulbs' producing many flowering stalks over a long flowering season if the weather is mild, not baking hot. Mid August to late October at least (Southern Hemisphere).

I have some planted in part shade and they have produced flowers, though on leggy stalks which might be better for picking.

Occasionally seed sprouts for me (usually in a pot containing something I treasure!) and grows on to flower.

I leave the bulbs in the ground all year. As they get older they develop a shape that looks nothing like the tidy little bulblets you've just bought. Sometimes they separate. The bits still flower the following year.

I find the singles do better for me than the double forms. They seem to last longer and don't look quite as draggled after rain.

One thing I have found useful is to keep them free of monstering leaves from other plants or weeds. They do better for me with plenty of air circulation as well as lots of sun.

I also give my older plants a side dressing of slow-release granules while they are in full leaf so they can go to dormancy well-fed.

In zone 6 I suspect you will need to be careful about winter drainage and frost protection; or plant into big pots and use them as spring accents; or be prepared to treat them as annuals if your soil is inclined to be spring-soggy.

I love the red and white ones, but next year I plan to get some of the all-white 'The Bride' for a scheme I have in mind.


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RE: Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

Daisy,

I'm in a very different zone 6 from you, but here, they are "borderline" hardy--which means they come back only if we have a mild winter. However, Callas do the same here, so you might give the anemones a try in that area. It sounds like you have a good z7 microclimate.

Here on the East Coast, I have very soggy spring soil with a long freeze-thaw cycle. That's what does in most marginally hardy things. If your springs are drier and/or your soil drains well, you've got a better chance. But mulch, mulch, mulch and think of it as an experiment, if you choose to keep the them. I buy mine in the spring and grow them as summer annuals.

Amanda


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RE: Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

Thanks so much for the info!

We have very wet springs here also and also have the freeze-thaw cycle through January and Feb.

Maybe I'll plant some and try my luck. I'm very confused why they would sell in the fall to plant if they aren't hardy in many places?

I would put them in pots but I can't grow things in pots to save my life... I always forget to water them.

THank you SO MUCH for answering!


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RE: Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

I love these but understand that they are only winter hardy zone 8-10. They recommend you keep them at cool 60 degree temps inside until after the hard freezes of your winter.
Then, you can plant them in the ground.

I'd try some in pots but be sure to give them a good soak until they about double in size (overnight) then keep the soil damp but don't allow them to sit in really wet soil very long.

cynthia


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RE: Confused about planting Anemone Coronaria.

I've never tried the doubles, but I planted some single Anemones and they came back for about 3 years. They probably would still be coming back but I dug up the bed they were in and was unable to find most of the bulbs so they got tilled in.

Probably your best bet is to keep them inside overwinter and plant them in the spring. Next year leave them in the ground over the winter with mulch and see if they come back.


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