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snowdrops

Posted by kato_b z5 NEPa (My Page) on
Wed, Dec 26, 12 at 22:32

Anyone out there collect snowdrops? Snowdrops have always been a favorite of mine, but for some reason somethng happened this winter and I feel the need to have a couple named snowdrops.... even thought they've never really done so well for me.
My other problem is I don't think I can justify spending 20 or so dollars on a little bulb that still just kinda looks white and the same as what I have. Is this normal? (normal being not so much the 20 dollar part, just the part of wanting several versions of what's pretty much still just a white drop of a flower)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: snowdrops

The only people I've heard of that collect Galanthus (snowdrops) live in the UK (England, etc.) Frankly, collecting something I can scarcely tell apart doesn't appeal to me. I have singles and a few doubles, which I like, but I'll leave the collecting of them to others.


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RE: snowdrops

I think you're right, there are many more collectors in the UK and Europe, but I'm sure there are plenty in the US and Canada too. There must be since I've found a couple suppliers. Right now I'm trying to talk myself out of it using the "scarcely tell them apart" argument but only because it would probably save me a lot of aggravation!

Some people live entirely peaceful and productive lives growing only three hostas; a green one, yellow one, and one with white stripes.... other people go off the deep end.... some people have three kinds of wine; red, white, and sparkling.... others go off the deep end. I guess my thinking is I should at least take a look and see what all the fuss is about. How bad could it be to just try out one or two little bulbs?


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RE: snowdrops

I have to admit I also find it hard to understand Galanthophilia. There is an article on snowdrops in the latest issue of The Garden (RHS magazine) but unfortunately it is not available in the on-line selection. Even with close-up pictures and descriptions it's hard to get excited by minimal differences in green blotches. I am just happy to see them appearing in any form at the end of winter. Nor do I get people who collect masses of versions of any particular plant, including hostas and day lilies. The latter obsessions seem very common in the US, less so over here.


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RE: snowdrops

I don't think I can justify spending 20 or so dollars on a little bulb that still just kinda looks white and the same as what I have. Is this normal?
NO THAT IS NOT NORMAL! hahahahaha. Order daffodils instead. At least you can tell them apart...usually.

I just went off the deep end here the last couple of days and late last night finalized my rather large Winter 2012 daffodil order with G & F Miller from New Zealand. The deadline was the 31st.

You were right. I am hopelessly addicted to daffs. Those 'enablers' sucked me right in.

Sue


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RE: snowdrops

Depending on your climate snowdrops may flower from October until March with the variety of cultivars and species available. Bloom time is one factor in selecting a bulb. "Potter's Prelude' flowers reliably at Thanksgiving in the mid-Atlantic region. G. reginae-olgae flowers in autumn.
Color is another trait that comes into play. Not only are there cultivars with yellow ovaries such as 'Wendy's Gold', nivalis 'Sandersii', 'Primrose Warburg', there are some with showy green markings on the outer tepals like 'Scharlockii' and ' Viridapice' and 'Trym'.

Foliage on various species is quite different in color and width from elwesii types with blue-gray foliage that is wide and strappy to the narrow nivalis, to wide bright green woronowii.

If magnification is needed to separate one flower from the other, do not bother buying it.
Flower form separates unusual from the ordinary. There are doubles that face upward, singles with elongated sepals, puffy sepals that makes their form pop among other snowdrops. 'Diggory' has puffy tepals. 'Walrus' and 'Wasp' have elongated tepals.
There are some snowdrops that are much taller or smaller so these also stand out. 'Colossus' is a giant.
There are very short cultivars available.
'Straffan' normally produces two flowers per scape which is unusual.
The last quality that should be present is that the clone is a robust grower. There is little point in spending money on finicky snowdrops.
Flowers in bloom during winter give the pollinators nectar, and add interest to the garden at a time when there is little else.

I agree that huge collections of any type of plant are uninspiring. Unique snowdrops integrated into the garden along with other bulbs, perennials, shrubs and trees make a statement in the winter landscape.


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RE: snowdrops

Sue you are beyond addicted. It would be bad enough importing from Europe, but you are going to the southern hemisphere!!!! Some people might not realize it's more serious than just a longer distance, it means over a year of 'turning over' the bulb from a southern hemisphere spring to a northern hemisphere spring. Crazy. Suddenly I'm perfectly fine with named snowdrops and I might even get some named corydalis on top. Compared to you I'm pinching pennies.... and my daffodil plantings are pretty spartan.

Hi Carol,
Your post has done an excellent job of clearing up all my muddled thoughts on snowdrop collecting. I keep getting lost in the similarities and caught up on some of the terms, but I think what you've explained sums it up. I don't want anything I need a magnifying lens to tell apart.

Actually you've named quite a few of my wish list bulbs, so I feel alot better about the ones I was leaning towards as 'starter' bulbs. I'm hoping for four species; nivalis, elwesii, plicatus and woronowii and then a couple named ones like sam arnott, Viridapice, magnet, wendy's gold and potter's prelude - those last two are unlikely!.... Something like diggory or straffan would be great some day, I've seen their names come up a couple times too as nice plants.

I guess I'm started and I guess I've given this alot more thought than I realized. Now it's just a matter of getting them and having some kind of confidence that they are correctly named. Just a quick look for something like 'three ships' gave me a couple pictures that I think are wrongly labeled.... but what do I know?

Apparently Brent and Becky still has gift certificates on sale. I just gifted myself a couple while I was putting this email together and I'm sure they'll come in handy. Funny that just a couple of days ago I told someone I had no need for on sale B&B gift certificates....

Wish me luck, too bad I didn't figure this out in August, I'd have some in the ground already.
....well actually I have a few elwesii potted up under lights. I think they are the reason I'm too into snowdrops right now while the snow is blowing.
-Frank


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RE: snowdrops

Excellent post, carol23.

My plain old double G nivalis are just about 2 inches up now. Soon the flower buds will appear, the slugs will eat them, along with any tulips and hyacinths they can find, and I'll begin the 12 month wait for the next lot of gastropod fodder.


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RE: snowdrops

It's best to start with common snowdrops to be certain your growing conditions suit them. If you see them multiplying, then you have the right spot. You should plant some in various places so they are not all clumped together. They can be susceptible to Narcissus bulb fly.

These are unnamed very short snowdrops with pale yellow winter aconite and one darker common yellow aconite.


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RE: snowdrops

I think (here in the States at least) that the major attraction of snowdrops is their season(s). In mild winters here in 5b, I may have snowies blooming at New Year's or usually at least by the first week of February, and have a couple of late types that start blooming around Thanksgiving and may bloom well into December, so I have some faint semblance of 12 month gardening, which otherwise is a mirage here in the midwest. My snowdrops (and I have close to a hundred species/named varieties), are one of my most valuable groups in a one acre garden with thousands of varieties of all manner of plants; but if they bloomed in May they'd be lost. Besides, they aren't all exactly alike...

Blewbury Tart


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RE: snowdrops

The winter garden is my favorite. Many early bloomers are fragrant so they will attract pollinators. Snowdrops add a lot of diversity along with companion plants such as witch hazel, hellebores, cyclamen, winter aconite. The flowers normally last a long time unlike some later flowering bulbs which may encounter one hot day that ruins their petals.


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RE: snowdrops

If I was on the fence before, I'm a convert now. Those are some great pictures! thanks

Blewberry tart and Wendy's gold? I cheated on the double since the name appears when your mouse hovers over the picture, I probably would have guessed walrus, but really have nothing to go on since I've only ever seen one double in person! But I have been a little obsessive on the internet.....

wow, the yellow is really nice, an amazing plant and an excellent photo. I'm determined to work on my camera skills, even if I can't match the artistic side at least I can try to get a closeup thats in focus and not over exposed on the white!

I've had some success with snowdrops, but Carol mentioned the narcissus bulb fly. I'm actively fighting this pest and will be growing any fancy snowdrops under netting. I'm missing a few snowdrops each spring and I'm sure the flies are to blame (I frequently find them in dug narcissus).

Yes, the winter garden is my number one reason for growing more snowdrops. The winter aconite is coming along, hellebores and cyclamen are maturing, my one witch hazel is full of buds.... March has become my new April! (and if there's a midwinter thaw there's even hope in February.

Thanks again for the pictures, they are great inspiration, but they may prove costly since I'm now sending out a request for Hitch Lyman's catalog. We'll see if there's anything in there that fits my budget.


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RE: snowdrops

Kato; yes Blewbury Tart (meant to label it). Hello Hitch's catalog, goodbye wallet.If I had narcissus flies, I'd be very wary of spending much on a snowdrop; it sounds like (on the SRGC forum) like many snowdrop collections are getting ravaged in GB. Below Art Nouveau:

Photobucket


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RE: snowdrops

I've heard the Lyman catalog is expensive, I'm wondering if my wallet stands a chance or if it's completely beyond my budget.

That's another nice one and well named too. Does the leaf(?) on the bloom stem always curl so artistically? or was it just good luck?

I've been battling bulb fly for a few years here and although I've already resorted to pesticides, it doesn't seem to be helping much. Netting will be my next plan of attack. The flies tend to find and attack the most expensive or newest and rarest of my daffodils, I'm sure it will be no different for the snowdrops. In fact they already eliminated most of my snowflakes, they must know how much I like the earliest of spring bulbs..... the snowflakes (leucojum v.) were the first bulbs to go into the witness protection program, covered after blooming with a little tent of reemay cloth. Seems ok so far.


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RE: snowdrops

kato; yes, the spathe is always curved; gives it sort of an "artsy" look, hence the name. Wow, feel for you about the flies; are they getting pretty common in NE? I suppose sooner or later they'll get to the Midwest. It's the reason I'll never again buy daffodil bulbs.

This post was edited by hawki on Thu, Jan 10, 13 at 15:19


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RE: snowdrops

I think the easiest way to get the flies is via infected bulbs, they seem to be a very localized problem. I'm hoping that if I can control them in my own yard new flies will not be coming in from the neighbors. (one of the benefits of living in a horticultural wasteland)

Here's my own version of winter interest. The snowdrops were a clearance sale purchase that I didn't want to plant out in the open, the cyclamen are seedlings that I never got around to planting out. Sorry to bring down the picture quality on this post, but my little shop light in the garage does alot to cheer me up on the coldest days.


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RE: snowdrops2

The cyclamen don't seem to mind being under the lights (it was a lack of water for several weeks that caused the yellowed leaves). They photograph slightly better, the snowdrops looked like milky blurs so I'm not even putting them up.


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RE: snowdrops

Well, that's a cheery sight. Do you have a lot of cyclamens in the garden? I just finally started teasing out seedlings that were popping up around mother plants and moving them about, and already have about a thousand new little plants. They also spread around themselves, apparently by ants and by washing downhill, and have little cyclamens popping up all over.I'm definitely going to collect seeds this year and plant them out. Should be really neat in five years.

Photobucket


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RE: snowdrops

Hah hah, thousands of plants!? Awesome, and even if a few dissapear along the way you are still setting yourself up for an amazing display. Even better if they are doing some of the work kn their own. I do have a couple seedlings growing but its been a little hard letting go. For some reason I can't convince myself that they can really make it on their own outside. The indoor lights came about last winter when I chose last minute to line them up along the garage and basement windows.... And then needed more room, hence the light.

But it was too much this year. I planted most of the coum during the fall, some of the hederifolium, and potted up the rest. After bringing them in for the first hard freeze out they went when I realized it just wouldn't work. They're mostly Sheltered along the house foundation, dug in to their pot rims. Not exactly how it plays out in the gardening magazines, but I hope it works out.

If not I still have a couple new packets of seed, some purpurescens seedlings, and some more seed exchange seeds coming my way. I guess I'm a little into the cyclamens too :)


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RE: snowdrops

I'm in a LOT less temperate climate than you, and coum, hederifolium, and purpurascens all overwinter just fine here. Main things are that they need good drainage and protection from the hot summer sun. I have gotten in the habit of throwing a thin layer of pine needles on them in the early winter so that the foliage looks really nice in the spring; you shouldn't have to even do that. Below, Cyclamen coum early last spring, showing how well the foliage comes through the winter:

Photobucket


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RE: snowdrops

I love all those Cyclamen! My collection is in the seedling stage except for a couple of mature hederifolium and purpurascens.


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RE: snowdrops

Interesting how your coum flowers have kind of a propeller shape, and what a nice silver leaf! Mine seem to have stubbier blooms, but who knows if they'll all turn out that way, hopefully spring will bring an answer. I feel a bit better knowing that they can handle much tougher weather, but maybe I will cover them a little with some evergreen branches just in case. They do get some winter sun where they are and maybe that'll be helpful.
The narrow leaf is nice, I like the shape and pattern. I'm hoping for something like that in my mix, so far it looks like I might have a couple that are different too.

Here are some baby pictures (the grow light last winter). I don't show too many people these pictures since I guess I'm a little in denial over the cyclamen collecting. I blame my self consciousness on my friends, they just give that not-understanding look when they ask about all the pots and I start to explain. I guess I could get new friends but it's slim pickings around here, and most are related by either blood or marriage.


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RE: snowdrops2

It probably didn't help things when I potted up most of the c. hederifoliums into seperate pots rather than plant them out, but I didn't want to be too hasty in where I planted them out to.... better to get to know them one on one for a couple months first. Plus they handle drought well, a good trait considering my abyssmal watering record.


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RE: snowdrops

Kato, was there a name on the seed batch that produced the dark green hederifolium with silver center? That is a gorgeous leaf!


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RE: snowdrops

Carol, I got a few like that, I think some were labeled fancy leaf mix, others were in a generic mix. They were from Green Ice nursery though, so it was a really good source. I liked them too, but can't put my finger on why they are special. There are many more with fancier patterns but the ones with the silver center stand out.

Now I'm nervous again about having left them outdoors to fend for themselves. I hope I dug in the pots well enough.


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RE: snowdrops

Goodness...so many drop dead gorgeous pics on this thread. I'm impressed!

Kato...we might have to talk 'trade' once you see what you have multiples of.

Sue


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RE: snowdrops

Kato; my eyes were also immediately drawn to the hederifolium seedling with the broad green margin and silver "oak leaf" in the center; that's a very unusual, distinctive, and attractive leaf. Baby that one! By your pictures, you're far too modest in your description (I see tons of little seedlings in the ground). Believe me, these small plants will, in a few years, be two feet across and spreading, and you;ll be looking for places to plant them: My plants are coalescing into big patches of cyclamen foliage (below purpurascens):

Photobucket


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RE: snowdrops

Here are several hederifoliums and one coum around the trunk of a Japanese maple. Planting the cyclamens around the base of small trees and shrubs, where there is no competing ground foliage seems to work particularly well, and fills in spots that otherwise wouldn't be utilized very well.
Don

Photobucket


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RE: snowdrops

Kato, I save Hitch's catalogs. Last year's most expensive was nivalis 'Walrus' at $50.00. In the elwesii group (only 2 offered last year) was 'Kite' at $40.00. But most of the rest - plicatus, single and hybrid doubles went from $15. to $25.00. The rest were 'specials' (= expensive) of 7 , highest $45.00, lowest $30.00.
The popular 'Scharlockii' he sold at $15.00 ea. All of the snowdrops are usually only 1 bulb per order - with the exception of nivalis ('still the best' he says) - 5 bulbs @ $15.00 and nivalis 'flore pleno' (nice to pick) - 3 bulbs for $18.00. Even with half success from stored bulbs for fall planting you may want to buy those 2 from bulb companies. Ditto the 'Woronowii' - mistaken for 'Ikarie' often, especially by Van Engelen.
If you're patient ;-p, you could build a collection from Hitch over time without breaking your bank, and there is no minimum for orders.
His new catalog should be coming soon, I will try to practice restraint ;-)


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RE: snowdrops

Hitch's snowdrops ALL grow, usually like rabbits, so it's not a bad investment. Almost every bulb I've bought from him has been 2-4 bulbs the next spring, and soon is a clump.


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RE: snowdrops

It was an excellent day in my muddy snowy foggy garden. The cyclamen were busy sending blooms up under the snow and look great as they thaw out (hmmmmm have to remind myself it's not even mid January), I spotted a few snowdrops (elwesii) poking out their green noses, the potted hederifoliums look great (still I threw a few evergreen branches on top)..... and the Temple Nursery catalog was in the mailbox.
Paula, I saw a price much higher than the $50! but for the most part they're as you described. I can still do a $15, and as long as I don't go on about it too much I'm sure I can sneak in one or two others without raising any eyebrows around here (I know what a new pair of UGGs cost and if it gets ugly I can always pull that card). In fact I bet if I promised not to talk about snowdrops during dinner, I could probably get another $20 approved for the budget.
Frank

Looks like all that talk about being responsible and taking it easy and trying things out first was wasted on me. I of course apologize and still want to say thanks, and although I may still back out I promise to at least cover anything I get with screens so I'm not throwing money away.


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RE: snowdrops

In fact I bet if I promised not to talk about snowdrops during dinner, I could probably get another $20 approved for the budget.
If tempted to talk about them during dinner, just wait a bit and call me and talk about them after dinner.

Today I discovered 2 little snowdrops in full bloom in 'the weed patch' bed, that has been slated for destruction for a couple of years now. Luckily I can move them a bit later while 'in the green'. They are labeled Flore Pleno, but are clearly a single, thus labeled wrong. I love them just the same though.

Sue

I know what a new pair of UGGs cost and if it gets ugly I can always pull that card).
You are sure right...see link. YIKES!

Here is a link that might be useful: $135-$325 for a whole lot of UGGly

This post was edited by chemocurl on Sat, Jan 12, 13 at 15:04


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RE: snowdrops

Got my catalog today as well. Of course....it's mid 50's, sun is out, and what better timing! Kato I see that one for $75.00 :-O

I found most of mine are pushing through the ground, or up an inch or so. A few just about to bloom. A few are no shows so far. I'm hoping it's just the delay that is typical first season after planting.


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RE: snowdrops

Strike that.....i missed the $100.00 'Flocon de Neige' in Hitch's cat.
Not going there!


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RE: snowdrops

I'm not picking up the mail!!


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snowdrops and cyclamens

Wonderful thread on snowdrops and cyclamens! Just love all those great pics. too. Better than a book from the library.


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galanthus and cyclamens

Wonderful thread on snowdrops and cyclamens! Just love all those great pics. too. Better than a book from the library.


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galanthus and cyclamens

Wonderful thread on snowdrops and cyclamens! Just love all those great pics. too. Better than a book from the library.


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RE: snowdrops

A few more

Scharlockii  2 photo March42008033.jpg

 photo March22008016.jpg

nivalis sandersii photo March32008063.jpg


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RE: snowdrops

I'm also a big fan of "yellow" snowdrops; they seem more delicate. Unfortunately they tend to be quite expensive and not easily obtained. This is perhaps the most commonly seen and cheapest, the double Lady Elphinstone.

 photo LadyElphinstone.jpg


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RE: snowdrops

And the pictures get even better! ontnative is right in that this thread is as good as a book from the library. I just re-read the entire thing and it's also full of great information.

I guess at some point I should mention that my wallet is considerably lighter, thanks going to Mr. Lyman. The big plus in this (other than the new varieties) is that I'll have a couple new ones settling in a whole year earlier than if I had waited until the fall planting season! My list is all white snowdrops (except for one double with green tips). All were "easy to please" or "clumps up fast" so I'm hoping this works for me. I'm hoping for a good range of bloom from early to late.

"I don't think I can justify spending 20 or so dollars on a little bulb that still just kinda looks white"..... obviously I got over this.

Just a couple more weeks and I should be able to see some of the plain old common drops already growing here. Prior to the snow and cold last week I was able to see sprouts and buds coming and it looks like it will be a good year. (January is always a month of optimism with it's seed and plant catalogs.... late freezes, drought, flood and insects will temper that feeling soon enough)


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RE: snowdrops

hmm, a nursery friend of mine (Joe Sharman of Monksilver) actually sold a single snowdrop for......347pounds - a record price. Madness.....but then, I know that it is possible to spend 400 pounds on a paeony.


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RE: snowdrops

Not only did I place an order, but on the 16th of March the Temple Nursery had an open day and I took a drive up there. It was a 2 hour drive and it was cold but I saw a few nice snowdrops so for me the trip was worth it.... 40 degrees would have been a whole lot nicer though, and sun sure would have helped more than the snow flurries!
This was labeled Naughton, I couldn't find anything online about it...


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RE: snowdrops

I thought this one was perfect. No label, but two blooms per bulb and it just looks so healthy.


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RE: snowdrops

This was my first chance to see "fancy" snowdrops in the flesh and I did see a lot of nice ones but for now I think my wallet will be safe from getting too many all at once. There were plenty I couldn't tell apart..... but that doesn't necessarily mean I don't need them ;)

There were also several yellows. Look at how nice this one was, all fresh and springy in a dead winter landscape. How can you not love snowdrops?


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RE: snowdrops

duplicate post

This post was edited by kato_b on Tue, Dec 24, 13 at 14:05


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RE: snowdrops

What? I've given Hitch lotsa $ and he didn't tell me about the Open House! Oh well, I couldn't have gone any way, something else I had to do,,,dang it.

So Kato, did you pickup your order while there, and was he selling drops that day?


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RE: snowdrops

Naughton... wasn't that Jackie Gleason's sidekick??


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RE: snowdrops

I don't really remember how I found out about the open day, somewhere along the line I must have stumbled upon something saying he does this through the garden conservancy..... then I checked out the g. conservancy's website and found the date.

No and no, I didn't pick my order up and there was nothing for sale. It was still mighty cold so I guess digging wouldn't start for another couple weeks at earliest, but I would have really been tempted if there was anything with a price tag! (actually I made sure my wallet had a little extra in it before we left just in case) I really got the impression this is his personal collection and the nursery deal was just a way of passing on extras.

I thought Naughton was tall and skinny! this snowdrop looks awfully short and plump :)


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RE: snowdrops

Is it too early to talk about snowdrops?
I added a few last year and can't wait to see them bloom this spring, in fact I've already looked at their planting spot a few too many times..... it's going to be a long winter!


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RE: snowdrops

Is it too early to talk about snowdrops?
Since you asked, I went out and checked to see if one little clump had emerged yet. They are up about 1/2", but sadly there are weeds growing in among them. When the soil is good and thawed out, should I try and dig and move them in the green? I think the weeds are perennial ones with established root systems that probably wouldn't pull out very easily.

If I get them dug and moved to a weed free area, I hope I don't lose the bloom for this spring.

I'm looking forward to seeing your new ones!
Sue


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RE: snowdrops

Hi kato_b! Great minds must think alike, since my thoughts have also been turning to early spring flowers like Galanthus, Helleborus, Eranthis, Adonis and Cyclamen coum. I believe I also have a few Leucojum vernum bulbs, given to me by a very kind and generous gardener, that are tucked away in my frozen garden. I am curious to see how fast they will settle in and start to bloom.

This past spring, I purchased a 'Potter's Prelude' from Carolyn's Shade Gardens. This autumn-flowering selection of Galanthus elwesii did indeed sprout and produced a single perfect bloom around Thanksgiving. I enjoyed it for less than a day before some unreasonably early snows started and it has been buried in snow ever since. The bloom is probably mush by now but I hope the plant survives and multiplies and is able to show off during the next mild fall.

I also put in two small Helleborus niger clones this past spring--'Josef Lemper' and 'Jacob'--which were also starting to form tiny buds just as the snow hit. Hopefully they are holding up well and will produce flowers as soon as temperatures moderate a bit.

There is something about winter that makes me absolutely obsessed with snowdrops and hellebores!


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RE: snowdrops

I went to check on the patch in the park which is always first around here. They're the other side of some railings and it was getting dark but I don't think they're budding yet although they are certainly showing.


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RE: snowdrops

Ahhhhhh to be in England where the snowdrops bloom in what to me seems the middle of winter!
The darn holidays are keeping me from my snowdrop obsession - which is probably a good thing since there's still a long way to go until blooms show up here. Sue, I'm sure you could move them anytime it's convenient (dormant is best). But i move stuff all the time, even when blooming, since I feel like they're easier to work with then instead of after I've forgotten where they are. I've sliced too many bulbs with shovels to trust my dormant season memory Any more :(
Ispahan- I wonder if snowdrops and their companions would be just as popular if they were summer bloomers. Maybe..... All I know for sure is I think about it way too much. No one else seems to show much interest when I've been asking them about snowdrops this week. I usually hold a pretty high opinion of my family, this lack of interest is confusing me! How can they not be interested in talking about all the different forms of green tipped galanthus?
I'll be interested to see how potters prelude does for you, I think our winters are milder and if you have decent luck up there in your Icebox I might give it a try outside down here. I got lucky and had a fall snowdrop mixed in with some lose bulbs that I bought. It's planted indoors now but I'd like to move it outside in the spring.
Since last spring I've added a few of the easier to find named varieties and then some named ones from the Temple Gardens. Hopefully they will do well enough this spring for me to decide if I "need" any more.... Price says no but in weak moments I've been known to click carelessly or slap a stamp on an order before I realize what I'm doing!
Come to think if it even if I avoid snowdrops I could really use a few more hellebores, a nice yellow tipped snowflake, some brighter red stemmed dogwoods, some pale yellow aconite..... Hmmmm. I need to get back to work to get away from these ideas.


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RE: snowdrops

I fired up the winter garden light this past weekend to give some brighter light to my first winter bloomer. These were supposed to be g. woronowii but I don't think too many of them will be since they should have much brighter green leaves.... Normally it's annoying not to get what you pay for but in this case I'm happy anyway since they seem like an interesting bunch.
Any ideas?


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RE: snowdrops

OK - here we go..... I checked the park again today. These are just plain old Galanthus nivalis. Sorry for the picture quality. I don't have a fancy camera and I had to take it through the railings in very low winter sun. But here's my first sighting of 2014.


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RE: snowdrops

I confess to desperate excitement since buying some Norfolk woodland. Some rather famous snowdrop recluse (Greatorex) lived practically next door (in crazy isolation in an ex-railway carriage) who bred some famous doubles after WW2 (Hippolyte is one still about) and planted them all over my area....and in fact, we did spot many on the edges of our woods, last year, and having been on a bramble removal spree, I am hoping to find more, from seeds carried by ants.


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RE: snowdrops

That sounds fun Campanula. I have only the old fashioned doubles in my wood where people dumped garden rubbish in the past. They are also responsible for my wishy washy pinky/mauvy/purply primroses, clumps of double daffs and the Japanese Knotweed.


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RE: snowdrops

Ho, primroses - nothing so easy to sow - completely foolproof. Have got 100 or so to start a little colony (just common pale yellow vulgaris). And a heap more foxgloves, campanulas and so forth.


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RE: snowdrops

Look at those little guys sprouting!
I also have a few, but just green tips, nothing more. I'm glad they made it through our arctic blast though (I hope).
Campanula- that's an amazing story! I hope you do find some special blooms showing up in your woodland. I bet just clearing a few things out and mowing some of the growth will go a long way in bringing all kinds if small bulbs and wildflowers back.... Maybe not this spring, but I bet with each year they will gain strength.


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RE: snowdrops

Hi everyone, checking in for the new year. I'm buried under 8 inches of snow now with no extended warm up in sight.
It's comforting to know that my drops are well insulatedagainst the even more brutal temperatures coming Tuesday :-O

If anyone (in USA) wants to trade this spring I'm throwing my name in the ring :-)


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