Return to the Container Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Posted by kristimama SF East Bay Zn 9 (My Page) on
Mon, Jan 23, 12 at 1:41

Is anyone using Azomite or Rock Dust or Greensand in Containers?

It seems like I'm seeing references to Azomite all over the place and I'm wondering how it works. If it works, in containers.

As many of you (Hi, Al!) know, I tend to do a more "organic" approach even to my containers, and I get tired of applying liquid 3-3-3 with micro nutrients all the time. Stinky! :-)

Wondering if Azomite or Rock Dust would make my life a bit easier and help deliver good container growth.

Thanks,
KMama


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I asked this question a few weeks ago, and Al was kind enough to weigh in. I can't remember which thread right now, but I can give you the gist. The question really comes down to solubility. Al strongly questions the manufacturer's claim that Azomite is soluble, however, if it is - you run the risk of creating limitations with this product due to the huge quantity of non-essentials it contains. These will substantially add to the TDS/EC in the soil solution, and may have more of a negative impact than any benefits derived from the available essentials.

On the other hand, if it's not soluble - it's probably a wash, meaning it will do as little harm as it will do good, so why bother.

That being said, many people have wonderful things to say about their experiences with Azomite. I personally used it in a number of containerized vegetable plantings recently and they are doing well, no glaring negatives as of yet, however, there are so many unknowns with this product in containers....in the future, I think I'll leave it out.

Hope that helps!
PJ


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

DaMonkey's initial question to Tapla was related to adding Azomite along with already present micronutrients in MG or another synthetic fertilizer. Looking at it purely from an NPK + micros standpoint, if your container mix already has a well-balanced mix of nutrients, including trace elements, adding Azomite, rock dust, greensand etc. are probably not going to help. Keep in mind, though, the role of micronutrients and trace elements is poorly understood. Anecdotal reports suggest they provide benefits beyond standard nutrition, e.g. enhancing soil biology, etc.

I would add that, from my own experience, you can't just add rock dust to a soilless mix and expect dramatic results. The challenges of "organic" container culture have been well-discussed in other threads. I agree that trying to sustain a healthy, biologically-vibrant soil using a lean, soilless mix is fighting an uphill battle. If you begin to alter that mix - adding humus or compost or similar ingredients - you're moving in a direction that will promote a healthier soil environment. Of course, adding these ingredients presents other challenges insofar as drainage and aeration and the like.

My side-by-side grow-outs (warm-season vegetables) tell me that a synthetic fertilizing regimen produces excellent yield - that is what they are designed for, after all. By contrast, "organic" growing (using some of the ingredients you mentioned) results in superior fruit quality and taste. My tests were far from scientific but, when you're starting at a vine-ripened tomato on a BLT, "science" is of minimal concern, right? ;)


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 23, 12 at 15:59

.... a well-rounded assessment, 41N.

I would only add that for me the greatest impact on flavor comes/came from my ability to manage water and fertility relationships. I think if most growers can keep from over-watering and over-fertilizing (especially with N), that they will see an improvement in fruit flavor. I don't think I've ever noticed any difference or problem in/with fruit quality (except perhaps some BER in first fruits), so I can't speak to that issue.

Al


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I planted butternut squash, cucumbers, zucchini & muskmelon last weekend. This week I finally found a local azomite retailer. I planted all of the aforementioned species in mounds as instructed. Now I'm wondering if it would be beneficial for me to dig up around the mounds, mix in some azomite and fill the soil back in. Will watering get the minerals down to the roots in time for it to have any effect?


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I suggest you ask this question in the organic forum or the vegetable forum, where they discuss growing in the ground. Growing in containers requires very different methods.

Here is a link that might be useful: visit the organic forum by clicking hrre


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Any other those additives will help. I use greensand because Rock dust is hard to get here so it's better than nothing. You're adding trace elements to the soil that get depleted over time. Follow label directions as always! You don't necessarily have to add it every year by the way.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I have tried to "dissolve" azomite in water and it results in a gray claylike sludge in the bottom that settles quickly after shaking.
WIth watering it should wash down into the soil if not mixed in before planting, but can plants use the particles of the sludge? Too big? Small enough?
I am not sure this is what you would truly call soluble.
jmi


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I looked into azomite with my limited knowledge of chemistry, as I'm pretty skeptical about any new "wonder" product. ernie85017's test is correct - according the MSDS from the azomite website, solubility is <1%.

Additionally, the mineral analysis from their site says silicon dioxide and alumina make up ~77% of it. It does list K2O (~5%) and CaO (~3%) but also Na2O (~2%) and "fluorine" at 900 ppm. (Fluorine, F2, is a gas. It's probably fluoride in the form of fluorapatite, which is insoluble.That's good, because the EPA maximum for fluoride in drinking water is 4 ppm.)

K2O, sodium, and fluoride would all be red flags for me, except that apparently this stuff isn't soluble anyway! My best guess is that it's expensive (but probably harmless) sand.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

For me, Azomite ranks pretty close to Superthrive on the list of bizarre horticultural hoaxes.

It's supposed claim to fame is that it is a more concentrated source of trace micronutrients than other volcanic dusts. The company insists that the mineral deposits and its Utah mine are unique. I've yet to find any convincing evidence of this, and it's not for lack of trying.

Whether or not the minerals are soluble isn't all that big of an issue for their intended purpose. These supplements are meant as long term trace mineral sources that will slowly release micronutrients as they are decomposed by heat, rain, microorganisms and organic acids from plants and fungi. For this reason, they don't make sense for containers, IMHO.

I think the issue of trace mineral depletion is real, though greatly overexaggerated by businesses who stand to gain from it. Unless your land has been intensively cultivated or intensely eroded, it's unlikely to be a real issue for the average gardener. If you must satisfy your nagging doubt, at least don't exert time and money trying to find Azomite - virtually any volcanic rock dust will do - with darker and more alkaline dusts taking precedence (basalts). Rhyolite or granite will work in larger quantities. Crushed gravel is the most economical choice. Glacial rock dust is practical in some areas, but not in the southeastern United States where it's most needed.

I generally stick with composts and organic mulches, and ocean products like fish and seaweed fertilizers.

Any references to "paramagnetism" or "transmutation" in rock dust literature is complete and utter bull.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

My wife has some health problems, so I placed some containers right outside of our garage so she could work with them easily. I added azomite and some earthworms to the potting mix this year and the plants have done incredibly well. The picture is from June 10th, still very early in the season.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Azomite = Scam. At the price they're charging, it should make your teeth white and shine your shoes too.

I saw a guy pushing Azomite on YouTube. Turns out he's an animal rights, vegan type who doesn't use manure because it comes from animals. That's who's pushing Azomite.

Get your soil tested. If there's a shortage of trace minerals, they'll let you know. You should do this every three years or so anyway. Your compost will bring in the trace minerals you need in most cases. The plants that make up your compost have absorbed those same minerals from the soil.

Back in the 1970s, I remember greensand being one if the 'secrets' to gardening in the Rodale set. Turns out, greensand really isn't very useful - it releases its nutrients very slowly. Gardening - especially organic - has become overloaded with fads, and Azomite is the fad of the day. And YouTube just makes it easier for fads to spread.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I agree with jonfrum. I do put some Greensand in my veggie garden though, contains trace minerals and is easily found. Esphoma sell it. Rock dust IS good IF you can get it locally but I can't. If you order it online it costs more to ship than the rock dust itself. The "growingyourgreens" guy on Youtube loves rock dust but he can get it easily where he is (Northern California). It's good but Greensand is good also and easier to find.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

"Gardening - especially organic - has become overloaded with fads, and Azomite is the fad of the day. And YouTube just makes it easier for fads to spread."

"Turns out, greensand really isn't very useful - it releases its nutrients very slowly"

I agree focusing on a high porosity mix with a good synthetic fertilizer regimen is ideal for optimal plant growth.
So many I can agree with on here. I have learned so much from Tapla and others here. Thanks again.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

He doesn't use manure because it comes from animals?!?!?!?!? Aaaaaaagh!

I suppose he also believes the myth that carrots scream when they are pulled.

Some people.....


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

The fact that greensand and rock dust release their nutrients "slowly" is of no consequence. The world's most productive farmland is on "loess", which is just deposits of glacial rock dust, and their productivity is not only seemingly endless, but is unaffected by topsoil; loess produces the same whether there's 10 feet of organic carbon or none at all. The loess plains in china have been under continuous cultivation for more than 1500 years without any sort of fertilizer input, and are equally productive today.

Most people (thanks to the "science" of chemical companies' interests) nowadays believe you need to drown your plants in fertilizer or else all their leaves will fall off or something, but it's not true at all. Plants can get 100% of their non-N nutrient needs from rockdust and grow as well as or better than plants under mecha-chemical treatment, and with less disease and pests since the rockdust won't cause overfertilization.

Not that I'm pushing for azomite or anything. There's nothing special about azomite except the obnoxious price. I wouldn't recommend greensand much either except perhaps as a long term source of K and micros (sort of like ultra-super slow release seaweed fert). K is poorly bound by organic soil constituents and washes out quickly, so it's not necessarily a bad idea, but rock dust is more balanced overall.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Incomplet, just to clarify, we're talking using this stuff in containers, rather than in-ground
where it is actually appropriate and effective over time.

Josh


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

"Most people (thanks to the "science" of chemical companies' interests) nowadays believe you need to drown your plants in fertilizer or else all their leaves will fall off or something, but it's not true at all"

I really like science. Science- proving many wrong every day! :)

Most people also think that chemical fertilizer grows a "different" crop. They think there are "chemicals" left in the food. Plants can not tell the difference between organic or synthetic fertilizer. Once they are in soluble, element form, they are the same.

"Organic solutions can be more complex in terms of the array of substances and organisms they contain when compared to standard synthetic fertilizer solutions. As a result, the plants have more variety in their diet which they can utilize, possibly resulting in more complex tastes, etc. Now, that was one of the upsides of organics. One of the drawbacks of organic crop production vs. standard hydroponic fertilizer is that the majority of nutrients are not immediately available to the plant. This makes it very difficult to monitor and regulate concentration and ratios of elements available to the plant. If using premium hydroponic fertilizers, the vast majority of nutrients are immediately available in precise and measurable values. As a result, healthy vigorous plants can reach their genetic potential which includes characteristics such as taste and flavor. Plants do not differentiate the nutrients they absorb resulting from hydroponic or organic nutrient solutions. For example, nitrogen is typically available as NO3- or NH4+. It does not matter to the plant whether it came from guano or bottled nutrient."

Source:
http://www.simplyhydro.com/do_organics_taste_better.htm


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

The "difficult to monitor" part is irrelevant unless you're a scientist ripping soil to pieces to see what it's made of.

A few things:
a) chemical fertilizers DO often contain poisons which have been found to be absorbed by plants and end up in food. These include dioxins, PCBs, PAHs, and heavy metal contaminants. Fertilizers derived from industrial wastes and phosphorous fertilizers are the worst offenders.

b) plants CAN "tell the difference" between chemical fertilizers and 'natural' fertilizers. In nature, nutrients are almost NEVER in "soluble, elemental form", but rather bound either in organic humus complexes or bound in rock material as in the case of rock dust. Plants grown with chemical fertilizers develop atrophied roots that lead to an inability to effectively absorb micronutrients, not to mention the higher leaching rates and soil acidification that does not occur with 'natural' ferts. Crops grown with chemical fertilizers often do display different growth characteristics; grains for example grow unnaturally tall with chemical ferts.

c) in spite of the fact that nutrients in rock dust are chemically heavily bound and insoluble, plants grown in loess are able to acquire very easily all of the nutrients they require to grow prolifically (even with zero topsoil), and the soil retains its fertility over geological time scales. Chemical fertilizers have to be applied every year. The "advantage" of solvable nutrients is the real myth. Moreover, while it is possible to overfertilize with both chemical fertilizers and compost, it is not possible to overfertilize with rock dust or greensand.

Also, although this mainly applies to outdoor/ground culture, chemical ferts irritate worms and decomposing bugs, while pesticides, herbicides, and ploughing kill them outright.

see also: Mycorrhiza
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycorrhiza


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Again, we're talking about growing in containers, not in the ground. Two different animals.

Josh


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

@greenman: not so much as you might think. The main differences are A: lack of external nutrient cycling from legumes etc, and B: the limited water that a pot can hold. Neither of these has much impact on rock dust or greensand, except that since they don't hold water at all you can't use them straight as a potting medium.

If you mixed rock dust and a bit of greensand down with, say, vermiculite and topsoil, the only nutrient you would ever need to add is N and the fertility of the rock dust will far outlive you, your children, grandchildren, and so on probably as far as you could imagine. You could grow plants in the same potting soil virtually forever in human terms. Compared to chemical fertilizers I'd say that's pretty cost effective and low maintenance.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

There are some substantial differences that go beyond cover crops and moisture content.
In containers, you won't have the same biota breaking down organics, nor will you have the
same type of weathering and chemical decomposition happening.

Josh


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

As far as biota go, thats not necessarily the case either. You can innoculate your pots and you can also provide an environment for worms and other organisms to live.

I ran across this today:
http://www.permies.com/t/17270/permaculture/Hugelpots-examination

As for the weathering effects, they aren't very important compared to biological mechanisms for plant availability of nutrients. Weathering contributes to leaching more than anything else.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I'm no expert, but it seems to me that Mother Nature contains a lot more... there's an entire army of creatures, both large and small, plus fungi and other items, that all have a hand in the breakdown and feeding process when it comes to actual usable food for uptake by root systems.

I would class container growing miles away from growing in the ground... and I wish it had been one of the first things I learned when my gardening "career" began.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Tapla has explained many times why organics don't work AS effectively as synthetics in container culture. After changing from organics, my yield has increased, and it is way cheaper.

Science is science. Nitrate is NO3-. That is what plants can uptake, they can't uptake a dead fish. It can uptake NO3-/Nitrate which was broken down by microbes from the organic source. At that point it is the SAME element no matter where it came from.

Growing in a high porosity mix organically is hard. The micro life need small particles to colinate. A mix with many macro pores will not allow for that, thus the organics will not be broken down fast. Air porosity is the very thing that grows healthy plants, not organics. ;)

Plants can not tell the difference between synthetics or organics. I already went into detail with that source I quoted in my other post.

"Organic solutions can be more complex in terms of the array of substances and organisms they contain when compared to standard synthetic fertilizer solutions. As a result, the plants have more variety in their diet which they can utilize, possibly resulting in more complex tastes, etc."

From there it explains why synthetics are a better choice if you will read back.



 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Another thing I learned from Tapla-You can end up with more salt buid up using organics then inorganics in container culture.

I bet because the synthetics are already in soluble form so the plant uptakes it right out of the grow media. Organics have to be broken down by microorganisms so if conditions are not right, you will have build up not being delivered to the plant.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

  • Posted by nil13 z21 Mt. Washington L (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 6, 12 at 19:21

Greensand can't hold water? Um care to test that one out? The small particle size is sure to hold water due to surface tension regardless of whether there are internal pores or whatnot. Try the cup test where you add a known amount of water to a cup of greensand. Then pour or drain the water out and measure the volume. I guarantee it will be less then you poured in.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

"If you mixed rock dust and a bit of greensand down with, say, vermiculite and topsoil, the only nutrient you would ever need to add is N and the fertility of the rock dust will far outlive you, your children, grandchildren, and so on probably as far as you could imagine. You could grow plants in the same potting soil virtually forever in human terms. Compared to chemical fertilizers I'd say that's pretty cost effective and low maintenance."

Sounds too go to be true...


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

  • Posted by nil13 z21 Mt. Washington L (My Page) on
    Fri, Sep 7, 12 at 0:21

Sounds easy to test.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

As greenman said- This is a container forum.

"plants CAN "tell the difference" between chemical fertilizers and 'natural' fertilizers. In nature, nutrients are almost NEVER in "soluble, elemental form", but rather bound either in organic humus complexes or bound in rock material as in the case of rock dust. Plants grown with chemical fertilizers develop atrophied roots that lead to an inability to effectively absorb micronutrients, not to mention the higher leaching rates and soil acidification that does not occur with 'natural' ferts. Crops grown with chemical fertilizers often do display different growth characteristics; grains for example grow unnaturally tall with chemical ferts. "

This may help understand why organic crops taste different...

"Organic solutions can be more complex in terms of the array of substances and organisms they contain when compared to standard synthetic fertilizer solutions. As a result, the plants have more variety in their diet which they can utilize, possibly resulting in more complex tastes, etc. Now, that was one of the upsides of organics. One of the drawbacks of organic crop production vs. standard hydroponic fertilizer is that the majority of nutrients are not immediately available to the plant. This makes it very difficult to monitor and regulate concentration and ratios of elements available to the plant. If using premium hydroponic fertilizers, the vast majority of nutrients are immediately available in precise and measurable values. As a result, healthy vigorous plants can reach their genetic potential which includes characteristics such as taste and flavor. Plants do not differentiate the nutrients they absorb resulting from hydroponic or organic nutrient solutions. For example, nitrogen is typically available as NO3- or NH4+. It does not matter to the plant whether it came from guano or bottled nutrient.

With that said, there are some advantages to supplementing your current hydroponic nutrient regimen with an organic based product. There are an array of products on the market that take advantage of compost teas and the complex array of substances and beneficial life they may contain. Many organic based products are fortified with other compounds which include complex and simple sugars, amino acids, phyto-hormones, vitamins, minerals, etc."

Source: http://www.simplyhydro.com/do_organics_taste_better.htm


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Just because something appears in print does not mean that it is true. Or worth quoting.

Only difference between nitrate (or other mineral ions) supplied organically and inorganically is the dosing, in other words, how much and over what duration. That said, what could possibly be the advantage of using an organic based product in container culture, or hydro for that matter?


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Or more accurately I should have said "what would be the advantage of an organic over inorganic fertilizer applied in the right amount at appropriate intervals?" That is, considering the lack of control inherent in the use of organics.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Did you even read my post?

I am against organics....


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

I did read it, did you? If you are "against" organics, then why are you are citing a retailer's website plugging the purported advantages of organic supplements (in other words, the last paragraph). The thought process is not clear in this case.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

It is science.

Did you miss?-

"One of the drawbacks of organic crop production vs. standard hydroponic fertilizer is that the majority of nutrients are not immediately available to the plant. This makes it very difficult to monitor and regulate concentration and ratios of elements available to the plant. If using premium hydroponic fertilizers, the vast majority of nutrients are immediately available in precise and measurable values. As a result, healthy vigorous plants can reach their genetic potential which includes characteristics such as taste and flavor. Plants do not differentiate the nutrients they absorb resulting from hydroponic or organic nutrient solutions. For example, nitrogen is typically available as NO3- or NH4+. It does not matter to the plant whether it came from guano or bottled nutrient."


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

If the missing minerals and micronutrients not found in synthetics is the very thing that makes organic crops taste different- how do you not understand that?


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

If you would read back you may see I am in fact "against" organics.

Posted by TheMasterGardener1 5B (My Page) on Sun, Jul 15, 12 at 22:55


I agree focusing on a high porosity mix with a good synthetic fertilizer regimen is ideal for optimal plant growth.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

@maple_grove: technically rock dust is inorganic, and only counts as 'organic' as contrasted with chemicals that have been processed out of rocks.

For non-N nutrients, the advantages are that the nutrients are insoluble and will not leech out of the medium during watering, and the plant can access them readily as it requires as long as it has good mycorrhizal colonization. There is no risk of nutrient burn with rock dust.

For N, you could possibly supply it at no cost via a mulch of grass/clover clippings, or urine. Urine requires less ecosystem than do grass clippings, which need worms to till them in.

I used to be a big fan of hydro, but the complexity of some of the system types and the tendency of breakage is unappealing. "Organic" soil of whatever sort can be effectively turned into hydro with sufficient application of an air/water holding medium like DE or vermiculite. The main advantages of hydro are increased water and air availability to roots, which also happens to be beneficial for other soil organisms besides plants.

@nil13: I stand corrected.

@TMG: Symbiotic soil organisms increase the disease resistance, resistance to drying out, and resistance to transplant shock for virtually all plants. Mycorhiza increase the surface area of roots dramatically and allow them to absorb things such as rock phosphorous and micronutrients. They also help control pH and conditions around the root system. Technically you could probably establish them in a hydro culture, but application of soluble fertilizer, especially P, tends to inhibit their growth.

Also, highly soluble nutrient forms force plants to take them up directly by diffusion, whether the plant actually happens to need more of that nutrient or not. This leads to chemically unchanged fertilizer salts ending up in the harvested product, giving it a "chemical" taste that does not occur in organics.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

"I used to be a big fan of hydro, but the complexity of some of the system types and the tendency of breakage is unappealing. "

Agree. I like basic soilless top feed drain to waste- Just growing in containers with a soilless media.

I agree with what you said about the advatages of organics.

"Technically you could probably establish them in a hydro culture, but application of soluble fertilizer, especially P, tends to inhibit their growth."

Not only that, they cant thrive in a high porosity grow media at all. Air porosity is what really grows healthy roots. That is why synthetics are just better for container culture.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Mycorhyza and symbiotic bacteria can live pretty much anywhere roots can, and benefit from basically the same things, air especially. They will grow quite well in perlite, vermiculite, diatomaceous earth, peat, coir, rock wool, a bubble bucket, and probably even aeroponics although that would be unusual. All that is required, or at least helpful, is that you use an organic fertilizer low in soluble phosphorous.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Not that is wrong. I would not want viewers misled.

Incomplet- I have grown a long time and understand grow media and the science of growing from experience. I see how it is not easy to support micro life in a high porosity grow media. You can not innoculate a high porosity grow media and think it will hold a colony.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Not only that. Micro life breake down the strucure of the grow media into small particals- not good for plants that will be in the container a while. I can reuse my 511 for years. If I used organics, it would last not as long.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Either you can't innoculate the medium or else the innoculant will break it down, but you can't really have both :P.

I prefer diatomaceous earth because it solves both problems; organisms grow easily in it, it breaks down only inconceivably slowly, and it's already in micro-sized pieces, you can't interrupt its structure any.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

It is sad to see so many people that do not have any idea what Azomite is about or have never used it trash the idea of it. They just have to tell everyone their opinion of it without ever researching it or trying it. Azomite has been used in agriculture for decades. Yes, that's right, farmers have used it successfully for decades and swear by it. I use it in my back yard garden and in soil mixes for containers. You need to understand it is for organic gardening as it replaces minerals and when micronutrients need minerals they can get them easily if you add these minerals to your soil. If you grow organic and use compost teas, then you will really see a difference with Azomite.


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Today I have read and watched all I can on the use of rock dust . Nowhere have I been able to find where someone has done a comparison test showing equal tests of with and without rock dust either inground or pot. That would go a long way to a lot of people whether it truly was worth the great expense of the product.

I took some cuttings back around the first of nov. 2013. Pared them down to only 1pair of leaves to start. The mix of potting soil, peat, vermiculite, and worm castings 25% of the mix. The only other thing added is a liquid seaweed flush once a month. The castings work as a time release each time they watered. Would they grow the same without the castings? maybe. But since I am a vermicomposter this is what I believe in and that it will ward off disease , infection, and pests. So far thats the case

 photo IMG_1397800x533_zpsbecfc13a.jpg

 photo IMG_1393800x533_zpse23922d8.jpg


 o
RE: Azomite, Rock Dust, Greensand, Oh My

Just going to say there is credible studies out there that back up Azomite. Just look for them. Also on another forum I visit there are a few members who use it and have experimented with it and the plants that received the Azomite were superior to those without it. So either do a little more looking around for evidence or try the experiments yourself before saying something probably doesn't work.

PS: the person who mixed it with water and got sludge, you mixed too much. I put a tablespoon to a gallon and it is like 99% dissolved.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Container Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here