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A Journal for following the development of Containerized Maples

Posted by peapod13 8 South Sound WA (My Page) on
Sat, May 14, 11 at 13:33

As the name implies, I want to start a thread to Journalize the development of Containerized Maples. Specifically, my first 5 Japanese Maples. (I'm sure to add additional trees over time. I currently have about 10 on my wish list to add to my current 5.) However, I'd like to encourage anyone to post photos and updates on their Maples. The idea is to provide a place where all of us can learn together and follow the progress of each others containerized Maple trees. My trees are just beginning life in a container. Others out there I'm sure have trees that are at various stages of development.

I'll start with where this new found passion began for me (as briefly as I can ;-)). I have written about this in another thread, so if you've read it before and want to get on to the trees, please feel free to skip to the next paragraph. Unlike many on these threads, I'm not a gardener, having only recently uncovered a part of gardening that intrigues me. Last fall looking for an area in the Puget Sound region that would have the beautiful fall colors of the Smoky Mountains (where I grew up), my wife and I began visiting public gardens in the region. I finally found an amazing variety and depth of color and shape in the Seattle Parks and Recreation: Japanese Garden, a smallish sub area of the UW Botanical Gardens at Washington Park Arboretum. This was the first time I'd ever seen what I later learned is called Niwaki. I found the brilliant reds, oranges, purples and yellows in the Maples and Ginkos in this garden, but I also found interesting shapes in the Pinus, Rhododendron and Azalea species found in the garden. After visiting the garden I began to research on the web and in the library to find out what these trees where called. What I found was a new hobby. I developed an excel spreadsheet to group all the Maples I found on the web and more specifically in the 4th edition of Vertrees' "Japanese Maples..." I found at the local library. I narrowed this list of approximately 600 trees to around 100 that were for the most part less than 10 feet (a few less than 15 feet) at maturity that had interesting leaf shape and color. My wife then helped me narrow that list down to about 15, and I bought my first 5 this late winter and early spring.

That brings us to buying the trees. I bought 3 from a local nursery in January (Tamukeyama, Sensu, and one labled as Fjellheim but I'm not sure what it is). The other two were from a list of 4 that a Landscape Architect friend with whom I work, was helping me to track down (Fireglow and Corallinum).

I found Gardenweb during the search for information on trees and found Al's (tapla) posts on soils, water retention, trees in containers, fertilizer program and how plant growth is limited very educational. I've since found Al to be not only knowledable but very nice and willing to share his expertice with anyone who asks.

At this point (May 14, 2011) all 5 of my trees have been bare rooted, root pruned, planted in Al's "gritty mix", and they've all had their first spring pruning and bud pinching.

For those interested in the timing and process of these events the following threads document those processes.
"Sensu Repot"
"Tamukeyama Repot"
"Fireglow and Corallinum Repot"

From now on all updates to these 5 trees will occur in this thread.

I hope you all will follow along on my journey and post pictures, updates and links to your containerized Maples as well.

Blake


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

May 14, 2011 update:

Fireglow:
This tree shows a very strong apical dominance. After having pinched the shoots back to the first leaf set (two leaves on each new shoot), the new shoots in the upper 1/3 of the tree have grown approximately 3-4 inches and back bud very readily from the base of each new shoot. Every three or four days I have to rub out new lateral buds coming mostly from the base of the new shoots in the upper 1/3 of the tree. There are a few lateral buds sprouting from nodes lower on the tree. I rub out those I don't want and leave those where I'd like new growth to begin.
Photobucket

Corallinum:
This little tree back buds profusely. Some nodes have as many as 5 new buds every week or so. It doesn't show as much Apical dominance as the Fireglow, seemingly willing to sprout new buds from any node anywhere on the tree. This is some what unexpected due to the large amount of root loss this tree experienced when the nursery dug it out of the ground. The top of this tree is also the fullest which may explain why it so eagerly sprouts new buds lower on the tree.?
Photobucket

Tamukeyama:
This is one of the three younger trees and is therefore less developed than the Fireglow or Corallinum. It's shape is still undecided. It also doesn't seem to grow quite as agressively as the other 4. Some of the original buds have never opened. Although, after the spring trimming, bud pinching, and removal of buds that I didn't want to sprout, two of the buds I do want to develop are showing signs that they are now activated and swelling.
Photobucket

Sensu:
I've learned more about how buds swell, open, and then the shoots grow from this little tree than any of the others. Unexpectedly for a dwarf, this tree shows quite vigourous growth and became very bushy after bud break. When repotting, I cut this tree back to a skeleton and since bud break, I've trimmed this tree back quite hard again. It now has a basic shape that I like and will be encouraged to continue in this growth pattern.

Photobucket

????:
This tree was labeled as a Fjellheim at the nursery, but doesn't match the pictures I've found of a Fjellheim on the web. Never the less, it has interesting leaves, so I am happy I've bought it. I cut it hard at repot and it's really kind of scraggely and none shaped. As I don't know what to do with it, the goal of my spring trimming and bud pinching has been to leave as many bud sets and shoots on the lower branches to encourage branch thickening of the lower branches. The lower branches on this tree are 1/3 to 1/4 the thickness of the upper branches and must be thickened in order to restore balance from bottom to top on the tree.
Photobucket

Here's a close up of the leaves. They're extremely varied in shape and size, but quite interesting. I'd appreciate any suggestions on likely species, if any suggestions can be made from the leaves.
Photobucket

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

This is a wonderful Thread, Blake, and I'm very glad you posted it!
I've been following your maple updates, since I love maples and am growing mine as you do.
Al also set me on the right track to growing, maintaining, and containing maples.

My story starts a few years ago. One of my friends was living in a house that shared a fence
with neighbors. On the other side of the fence were two mature and unique Japanese maples.
That Spring, a bunch of maple seedlings popped up. They all had trident leaves. Anyhow, I
collected one, slipped it into a container of bark and perlite, and brought it to my house.

The Fall color was excellent and the tree was interesting. So, the next year, my buddy and I
collected a bunch of seedlings, same method, and spread them around to family and friends.
I also began experimenting with cuttings, and found they rooted quite easily with little work.

This year, I've already pruned my Trident maple three times. Next Spring, I plan to re-pot
in a larger container, with new mix, and hopefully in an attractive wooden container.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Josh,
Welcome aboard. Thanks for sharing. I'm excited for the possibilities the thread poses. Please feel free to post pictures and continue to post updates.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Wonderful!

Let me see what I can add to this one:-)

Thank you!

Mike


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Welcome aboard Mike. Yes, please do add at will.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks, Blake, I'll try to get some photos in order.
I've documented the stages of the Spring pruning process, but I need a current photo, as well.

Hey, Mike! Please share some pics!
I'm eager to see the progress of the Trident maple. (I sent one of the Tridents to Mike
this Spring). It's going to be interesting to see how it grows on the other side of the U.S.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

In my enthusiasm to form a thread with the main goal of combining my other 3 tree threads and provide a place where not only I but anyone else who wanted to participate could follow the growth and development of our maples, I overlooked that there is already a thread in this forum where a discussion of "Trees in Containers" takes place. It would be the furthest thing from my mind or intention to offend anyone on these forms, least of all Al, who has been a great help to me.

Anyone who finds this tread should know that my trees are in the good general health they currently are due almost entirely to Al's advice and guidance. Al is certainly the master and I the "long distance apprentice" of sorts.

Links to Al's threads that have been and continue to be most useful to me are listed below. I encourage anyone coming upon this thread to read these threads and in general search out Al's posts. The information and guidance Al so freely gives is invaluable.
"Container Soils - Water Movement and Retention"
"Trees in Containers"
"Fertilizer Program for Containerized Plants"
"How Plant Growth is Limited (Container Forum Version)"


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

My first uh oh today.

When checking over my trees this evening after work, I noticed about 10 tiny little black bugs on one limb of the "no name" tree. I also noted what I thought was sap on the limb and the leaves below this limb. Since all the bugs were on the same limb, I removed the tip of that limb and flushed it down the toilet. I intently search all the other trees and under all the leaves. I then went immediately to Vertrees' book and looked in the pest section.

I beleive based on my observation and the description in the book that I had aphids on the tree. Not being one to sit back and wait, I did a search of Garden Web using "aphids" and "tapla". I found a post discussing the benifits of using a neem oil spritz for a topical and a systemic. It also not only kills the current generation but is a good preventative because it kills future generations.
"About Neem Oil"

I also found a post where Al gives further guidance on mixing Neem oil for use as a spritz.
Sixth post in this thread.
"Neem mixing"

Guess I'll be ordering some Dyna Gro Neem Oil.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I don't think aphids will be much of a problem, but I suppose you could treat them.
The thing is, you'll be treating fairly often. Usually, a stream of water is enough to keep
the aphids at bay.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Good afternoon!

I have a series of pics of my Trident Maple's Spring progress. Click for full-size image.

March 9th - started by removing the three foot leader that grew last year.
Then I pruned all the leggy side-branches back to just a few nodes (sorry, no pic).

Photobucket

April 11th - new growth emerging after the pruning.

Photobucket

April 28th - Bushing out with lots of new growth and congestion.

Photobucket

May 10th - The new growth was stretching out, so I pruned back the long branches
and removed several competing leaders around the crown. See next pic for the pruned version.

Photobucket

May 15th - Five days after the canopy was thinned.

Photobucket

May 24th - current pic. Tree is bushing out again.

Photobucket


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Wow Josh,
That's obviously a healthy and strong growing little tree. You've got to be proud to have grown it from a seedling.
Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Got a couple of Dyna Gro products in the mail today.

Time to start the fertilizer and insecticide programs. I plan to do the weakly weekly schedule on the fertilizer, and the Neem application every two weeks. We'll see how it goes.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks, Blake!
I collected this maple as a seedling, but I might as well have grown it! ;-)
Next month it will be three year's old. It is very vigorous, indeed, and would grow
into a full-sized tree if I were to let it.

Good buy on the Dyna Gro products.
I just purchased Neem oil for the spidermites on my citrus.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Update:
Made first application of Neem today. It's overcast so it was a good day for it.

The rapid changes in growth and leaf color has come to an end, so I assume I won't have to pinch new buds every couple of days.

The bright pink of early spring on the Corallinum has faded to a rusty green. New shoots are still coming in pink though, so the tree is a mix of different colors. The tree is beginning to fill in nicely lower on the tree, and the shape is coming along.

I've added a few wires to the Tamukeyama to encourage the general shape I'm after, and this tree is much closer to the shape I had in my mind when I saw the tree in the nursery.

The Sensu hasn't really changed since my spring pruning. The leaf stalks get sort of droopy during the day no matter how much sun or shade it gets during the day. This occurs on cool overcast days as well as on the few days we had with sun and high 60's. At night the leaf stalks become more rigid. It's still getting into the 40's here at night so I not sure if this is supposed to happen, is temperature related, or light related. One nursery description I've found refers to the "pendulous" leaves waving in the wind like a Japanese fan. So I'm hoping this is some what normal behavior.

I believe the mislabled Fjellheim may actually be a Tennyo-no-hoshi. I'll continue to observe this tree and perhaps with fall leaf color I'll be able to confirm this identification.

That's it for now. I'll try to get some decent pics up in the next day or two.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Keep a very close eye on your wiring, particularly if you're feeding your youngsters. It takes very little time for the branches to swell and the wire to cut in - leaving a permanent corkscrew pattern in the bark - and an ongoing weakness that could show up on windy days.

A daily check would be prudent. The same with using guy wires. It doesn't take them long to 'set' - these are still young branches, not gnarly old ones. (Think in terms of weeks, not months.)

Aphids often only hit one stem or tip. Squishing can be very effective. (Wear plastic gloves if squeamish.)

Pot feet under the pot can be helpful for drainage.

And, even if the top growth is slow, the roots (being on a rootstock) may be more vigorous. Stay alert for the need to repot/root prune and refresh the soil.

Conversely, some root stocks are slow to settle and can sulk if over-potted. They might need down-sizing until they re-establish.

Trident maples on their own roots may need potting on twice in the year while young - if your climate supports that - to develop a root plate, or strong rooting system. (Zone 9 - mild does.)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

As promised. Enjoy.

Tamukeyama
Tamukeyama

Fireglow
Fireglow

Corallinum
Corallinum

Tennyo-no-hoshi
Tennyo-no-hoshi

Sensu
Sensu

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Those are lookin' sweet!

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Josh - Thanks, they're coming along. Still very young yet, but good skeleton. (Except the Tennyo-no-hoshi, but I have faith I'll know what to do with it in time.)

Vetivert8 - Thanks for checking in on the thread, and thanks for the advise.

One of the branches I've wired, though young, isn't this years shoot. It was wired earlier in the year, but didn't hold it's shape. So, I've rewired it. That being said, I do plan to keep a close eye on it and rewire as necessary to keep it from scaring.

The other branch I've wired is one of this year's shoots. I've wired it as loosely as I could and still be able to get the shape I wanted. I figured on rewiring weekly, but will check daily.

These trees are planted in a very fast soilless medium, so I was under the impression that there wouldn't be a problem with the over potting. Also, though I know it's hard to tell from the pictures, I've drilled 1/2" holes around the bottom of the containers just under the lower band that allow drainage of water within seconds of water from the top.

Three of these guys were root pruned before being reported into the fast medium (called gritty mix here in the container form). I'm hopeful that I'll get atleast 3 years growth before another root prune and full repot. But plans can and do change.

One of the larger trees (Corallinum) had a root prune performed by the person who dug it out of the ground. A real hatchet job. Not many roots left. I'm very surprised how well it's doing based on how little roots it had left.

At the time of the repot, I was afraid the Fireglow was close to the leaves popping out of the buds so I didn't perform a full root prune. I did clean up some of the roots that were throttling each other, but a full repot with root pruning will be performed next spring just before bud swell.

Thanks again for following along. Any and all post are encouraged. I'm learning about trees and plant biology as I go, and loving every minute of it.

On a side note, thanks Al for the book recommendations. I'm enjoying Deborah's book, and will begin "A New Plant Biology..." soon.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

At the risk of over saturating this thread with updates made too often, I took a picture of the Sensu tonight that I had to post.

When I was making my nightly rounds (checking windows and doors are locked and the blinds are closed) I turned the back porch light on and the Sensu seemed to glow.

Call me soft hearted or soft headed, but I found a "haunting beauty" in the sparse bright green foliage contrasting with the red shoots.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Great picture...nice glowing quality, indeed!

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

My wife and I visited a nursery today to see if we could get a couple more of the trees on our wish list. After an hour or so of searching through trees we ended up with two that weren't even on the list.

The first is called Shishio hime. It's quite a bushy little dwarf with a reddish border on a yellowy green leaf which changes to solid green in summer. Fall color is supposed to be yellow. I think the little guy has potential, though it will need some pruning and thinning to open up the interior.

The second tree is actually one I know nothing about, but for my wife it was love at first site. Green trompenburg. It is currently a very small tree with interesting leaf color. I don't normally buy anything I haven't researched so I hope this wasn't a mistake. Like I said it is still quite small so if it is a large variety when mature, hopefully I'll be able to keep it small through dwarfing techniques.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Oh boy! Just read that our impulse buy Green Trompenburg is very vigorous and will reach 26 ft when mature. Guess I'll get to test my "prowess" with dwarfing trees.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

The Canucks were not exactly worth watching this evening, so I decided to perform a little creative pruning on our new Shishio hime. It was quite brushy and the nurseryman had staked one of three main leads up as a central leader. My research indicated that this tree forms a natural broom shaped tree, however as I trimmed limbs back to no more than two per node, a pleasing, albeit nonbroom shape came out from hiding.

What do you think?

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I like it!
And it looks as though it has quite a trunk on it....


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks Josh.

The root stock trunk is fairly large for a young tree, and it has an interesting above ground root that I may be able to form into a root over rock in time.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Would you mind posting a shot of the trunk and roots?
Thanks!

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Here you go...

Should be able to slowly raise the trunk at each repot and some day have a neat root to stick a rock under.

Unless you were jokingly referring to the large free in the back ground. That's one I'd like to take down. During wind storms it rains limbs down on the roof over our bedroom. Makes me wonder sometimes if I'll wake up with a limb through my chest.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey, Blake, that is a large tree in the background...what type of tree is it?

Your maple roots look good! Are you searching for the proper rock....? I have a stash
of rocks that show promise, but I haven't done much root-over-rock with them yet.

Here's an update on my Trident. It'll need to be pruned again soon....


Photobucket


Photobucket



Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Josh,

The large tree is a cedar. It's about 80-foot tall and has around a 5-foot diameter trunk above the butt swell (approximately 15-foot high). Just about every time the winds come up around here it starts dropping limbs from 1/8" to 2" or so. Neat trees when small or in the woods but no good next to my bedroom.

I haven't looked for rocks yet, or even thought much about a root over rock tree much, until I got this tree. The roots just seem to be a natural fit for that style. I think next spring I may cut the tap root, and start the process of training the tree to a rock. I think I'll start looking for a rock that will fit the tree's three main roots, and incorporate this into the repot.

Your Trident is coming along nicely. It grows very quickly. Much more so than any of mine.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

My little Shirasawanum 'Sensu' continues to look droopy. Trying whatever I can to save the tree, I decided to take drastic measures and repot/plant the tree.
I mixed up some clean gritty mix, dug out one of the pots that the trees originally came in, dug a hole next to the large cedar in my back yard, buried the pot in the hole, and moved the tree from the 20" cedar container into the buried pot. When I rolled the tree out of the cedar container, I was surprised by how small the root mass was. I was also a little surprised that there was a root mass. I figured with the gritty mix being so 'gritty' that the mix would fall away from the roots. However the roots did hold the gritty mix in about a grapefruit or softball sized clump. I sat that clump on top of the planted pot and filled in the remainder of the pot with fresh gritty mix.

After repotting/planting the tree I mixed up some water with a rooting hormone and Neem oil, and watered the tree well. There wasn't any sign of a perched water table in the cedar container that I could tell, and the other four trees that are in the same mix are seemingly healthy, so I don't think the problem was the mix or over watering. However, I suppose the root stock under the Sensu may not have liked being quite as damp as the other trees. Hopefully, by burying the potted tree I've eliminated any watering problems.

Also, I'm hoping that by planting the tree I've eliminated any problems associated with missing soil microbes, if any.

I didn't want to bare root a sick tree while it was in leaf, so I can't eliminate root weevils. And of course it could be any number of fungi.

I guess I'll see what happens next, and of course I'm always to any suggestions.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

After seeing how small the root ball on the Sensu was this afternoon, I decided to remove a few of the new shoots hoping to balance the growth on the top with the root mass.

One of the shoots I decided to remove was the only shoot on an older limb, so I removed the limb all the way back to the trunk. I then split the limb open with a sharp knife. There was no evidence of black streaking, so I'm hopeful this will help eliminate verticillium wilt.

I also don't see any evidence of leaf scorch or browning. The leaves aren't brown, dry or brittle, and they aren't yellowing.

I'm no master gardener, but I've tried to research possible causes of leaf and shoot droopiness, and to the best of my ability rule out those causes. The only thing I can really think of might be over zealousness when I root pruned in February, but all the buds opened and I had to prune out some shoots.

I don't think the roots were too wet, doesn't seem to be nutrient deficiencies, no signs of verticillium, no blackening of shoots or signs of dying leaves, so that rules out some of the most common fungi to Japanese Maples, I haven't seen any bugs on the leaves or branches, and I've been spraying with Neem oil, so probably not insects.

The roots don't seem to have grown much since I repotted, so either something is eating on the roots, maybe the soil has been too wet or there's something else going on. I'm at a loss.
Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Well I'd hoped for some advice on the Sensu. I guess I'll just keep watching and waiting. Still don't understand what's going on. Drooping leaves but what ever is wrong with it isn't wrong enough to cause the leaves to wilt or yellow.?

On a better note, we made another trip to our local nursery today. I picked up three more trees from our wish list and another one my wife "just had to have". I looked this tree up using my phone before purchasing it though. Anyway here they are. Mostly still very young, but the Villa Toronto has some age on it, and a price tag to match.


Peaches and Cream (Wife's choice)


Villa Taronto


Autumn Moon


Aureum

Starting to look like a nursery around here ;-).

Hope you enjoy viewing as much as I'm enjoying writing about my experiences.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

After I posted the last set of pics, I thinned my tree again.
Now the new growth is taking off and looking nice. I love the vigor and the color of Tridents.
These trees never seem to sleep....

Photobucket

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey Josh,

The vigor of your Trident is incredible. The second flush is beautiful.

Thanks for sharing.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Another pic heavy tree update...

The Corallinum continues to amaze me with it's strong growth. So much vigor and vitality from a tree with almost no roots when repotted. It's quite obvious this tree was healthy when removed from the ground, is on roots stock with a strong genetic makeup to grow new roots, and had a deep reserve of energy to be able to replace the root mass at a rate which keeps up with the trees desire to put on new leaf and limb growth.

I'm also posting a picture to show the variations in the leaves on this tree, from dark green with light veining to light green with rd polka dots, to bright pink on the newest leaves.

The Fireglow is starting to back bud now also. It's not quite as vigorous in growth, but it seems healthy.

The Tamukeyama continues to grow into the desired shape. Although, I'm not sure this tree has the natural vigor of some, or maybe it is just very young still. No new growth or even back budding thus far.

The Villa Taranto was grown in heavy shade at the nursery, and as a result it is mostly green. Since being in full sun for about 7 hours a day, it is starting to get the characteristic red with greenish vein in places. I don't know at this point if it'll continue to get redder or of it'll stay green the rest of this year.

The Green Trompenburg is putting on new growth and for now will be allowed to grown. Though in time I'll have to restrain its growth to keep it a manageable size.

Unfortunately, I'm not feeling well and will have to continue the update later.

Hope you enjoy,

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Very much enjoyed, Blake!
I hope you feel better soon. Your trees are sure looking good.
Next year, after the trees have really established themselves, growth rate might increase.

Most of my maples are plodding right along, adding new growth every couple weeks.
Four of my five potted maples are on the north side of my house and receive morning sun.
These are my 1-gallon trees (rooted cuttings and seedlings collected last year).
Next year, I'll introduce them to some stronger sun.

My Trident Maple won't slow down, no matter what I do.
I think I've pruned this thing six times now, and I'll be pruning all through the Summer.
I just pinched some growth a day ago...and it's already stretching again....

Photobucket

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Back after a little nap:

I've recently added two additional Shirasawanum to our collection. Both are under the large cedar in the back yard. They receive sun for about 2-3 hours early morning and then another 2-3 hours in late evening. Both were still quite yellow when I bought them. However, even with lots of protection from midday sun, both are greening.

Shirasawanum Autumn Moon

Shirasawanum Aureum

The Shishio Hime continues to put on new growth. I'm very pleased with my wife's choice with this young tree.

Unfortunately, my little Sensu continues its slow but steady decline. I'm hopeful that it can still be saved.

That's it for now.

Josh, thanks for the continued support and encouragement. Also, thanks for the updates on your trees. You're obviously giving them the right things to make them happy and in good health.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

A little disheartened today. My first maple, and the one I most wanted, the Sensu appears to have finally died.

The leaves never turned brown or curled, just hung limply on the tree until they turned into green crispy critters.

I cut one of the leaf stalks and didn't see any sap flowing like on my other trees when I prune leaves. I also cut another limb off, and no sap flowed from the cut limb.

I pulled the tree out of the pot to check it's roots and they didn't appear brittle or pull away from the trunk easily.

Guess this just tells me I don't know near enough about plant biology to be a good tree grower. Using methods I learned here in this forum, mostly based on reading Al's excellent posts, but with contributions from others as well and backed up for the most part in several books I've read and on other Bosnia web sites, I've been able to keep 11 trees alive thus far. Some of those trees are better growers than others, but they all appear healthy. Nonetheless, I'm saddened and a little upset at myself for not being able to keep the twelveth one alive.

In my naturally stubborn way, I've resolved to read every post I can that has anything to do with tree illness and deficiencies. I'm determined not to loose another one. I may yet fail but not for lack of trying.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I'm sorry to hear it, Blake!

Last year, I lost a small purple seedling.
It wasn't a vigorous seedling to start, but it was twice abused by raccoons (with whom I do battle).
I re-potted the poor tree twice, but each time the exposed roots lost more and more vitality. Over
the winter, I noticed the tip had frozen and then shriveled, so clearly it went into dormancy
in a weak/nearly dead (if not outright dead) state.

Next year, you'll be able to do any root-work/re-potting in the early Spring, which will make things
go much more smoothly for you and your trees.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 1, 11 at 19:59

Losing a tree is a real bummer - and especially so after you've worked with it for a number of years. Verticillium wilt is a common affliction of maples - do you think that might be in play here? See link below.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: More about v-wilt


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Josh and Al, I'd like to thank both of you for stopping by, for your empathy and for your encouragement.

After reading the provided information, it is certainly possible that verticillium wilt killed my little tree.

I had previously excluded verticillium wilt because the tree didn't have any "leaf scorch" (browning at the edges), the leaves didn't appear to yellow at all, there wasn't any defoliation or branch die back, and when I cut open a limb I'd trimmed for the purpose of inspecting it, there wasn't any brown or black streaking.

However, after reading the article, it appears that those symptoms never show in some infected plants. The sealing of vascular tissue would certainly explain why there wasn't any sap present in the leaf stalks or this year's shoots. Also, the article suggests that symptoms are sometimes worse during or after cool weather, and we've certainly had a cooler and wetter than normal spring this year.

On the other hand, verticillium comes from the soil and this tree was replanted with a root prune this spring into the gritty mix. While the verticillium could have already been in the tree when the repot was performed, the tree seemed very healthy and vigorous early this spring.

I'm fairly certain, and maybe incorrectly so, because of the wilting slowly but continually getting worse that there was something causing water not to be able to get from the roots to the limbs and leaves. Also in the early stages, the wilt only occured during daylight hours. At night the tree would perk up and seem very happy, especially early spring when the temps dropped into the high 40's at night. (I equated this with less transpiration and therefore less need for water.)

After an inspection of the roots, I don't think it had root rot. The roots didn't seem fragile. They were all light brown in color and seemed well attached to the trunk.

So if my hypothesis (water not getting from roots to leaves) is correct, either I overwatered (not necessary to the point of root rot) or underwatered to the point of causing a severe stress that the tree couldn't recoup from or the other most likely cause is verticillium wilt.

Of course my hypothesis excludes the possibility of a nutrient deficiency. I was using foliage pro in a 1/4 strength solution once per week, like clock work. But I've only had the foliage pro for a month or so. So the nutrient deficiency could have put the tree under enough stress that it couldn't recover before I started fertilizing.

Unfortunately, I just don't know and that, other than loosing the tree, is the most demoralizing thing. I just don't know.

But, as stated previously, even if it means taking some evening classes for horticulture (if I can find some around here), in the future, I will know more about what diseases/deficiencies cause what symptoms and what's the best way to fix those problems. I'm too stubborn and as my wife reminds me all the time, when I take an interest in a subject I don't stop until I understand it to the best of my ability, and growing these dwarfed trees has really caught my interest.

P.S. Al, I appreciate you taking time, with all the things going on in your life, to post some information about v-wilt. I also hope that you've been able to find some comfort in your sorrow.

P.S.S. Josh, thanks as always for posts and for following along on this journey.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

As the name of this thread implies, this is a "journal" following the development of Japanese maples. I am just a humble beginner, trying to learn. As such this journal follows my growth as a maple enthusiast as well. Tonight, I believe I found the answer to why my Sensu died.

As I've stated previously, I was and am determined to learn the symptoms of different ailments that effect trees. I am also an engineer by trade which means I typically approach new things systematically. As such, I first found a list of things that would make a tree wilt. The list of most common causes of wilt in maples looked something like: (in no certain order) under watering, over watering, nutrient deficiencies, over fertilization, too much sun, not enough sun, verticillium wilt, pests, diseases.

Because I had watered all the trees in my collection the same way, and all the others were healthy, I unwisely discounted a watering problem. I had tried to move the tree into a more shady area, and had also tried varying my fertilizer program. So my first thought was v-wilt. I devoted most of my time to studying v-wilt symptoms, but didn't find symptoms that matched my tree too well. I began to look elsewhere. Too much sun usually causing brown spots/brown edges on leaves. Not a symptom exhibited in my tree. Over fertilization, leaf scorch (browning of leaves), under watering, dry soil...etc. One after the other I read and said that doesn't really explain the symptoms my tree exhibited.

Finally tonight, while reading an article on over watering from the University of Arizona, I found my symptoms described exactly: yellow/light green new leaves, new shoots that lack the general springiness found in new shoots, leaves that turn brittle while still green, wilting of leaf stalks and new shoots. Eureka! I've found symptoms exhibited by my tree.

I now believe I over watered this tree, maybe not enough to cause root rot but enough to stress the tree into a decline that eventually killed the tree or allowed something else like the emergency transplant to kill the tree. The stress that started the decline may have even happened earlier this spring when I never watered the trees because it literally rained 41 straight days and was cool and wet until mid June.

Anyway, I hope I'm not over posting or boring everyone with my long posts. And I especially hope that if I post something that's wrong, misguided, or based on my own misunderstandings you guys will pitch in and correct me. Not only for my own betterment, but also for anyone who might search the forum and run across this thread.

Happy 4th,

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

As the name of this thread implies, this is a "journal" following the development of Japanese maples. I am just a humble beginner, trying to learn. As such this journal follows my growth as a maple enthusiast as well. Tonight, I believe I found the answer to why my Sensu died.

As I've stated previously, I was and am determined to learn the symptoms of different ailments that effect trees. I am also an engineer by trade which means I typically approach new things systematically. As such, I first found a list of things that would make a tree wilt. The list of most common causes of wilt in maples looked something like: (in no certain order) under watering, over watering, nutrient deficiencies, over fertilization, too much sun, not enough sun, verticillium wilt, pests, diseases.

Because I had watered all the trees in my collection the same way, and all the others were healthy, I unwisely discounted a watering problem. I had tried to move the tree into a more shady area, and had also tried varying my fertilizer program. So my first thought was v-wilt. I devoted most of my time to studying v-wilt symptoms, but didn't find symptoms that matched my tree too well. I began to look elsewhere. Too much sun usually causing brown spots/brown edges on leaves. Not a symptom exhibited in my tree. Over fertilization, leaf scorch (browning of leaves), under watering, dry soil...etc. One after the other I read and said that doesn't really explain the symptoms my tree exhibited.

Finally tonight, while reading an article on over watering from the University of Arizona, I found my symptoms described exactly: yellow/light green new leaves, new shoots that lack the general springiness found in new shoots, leaves that turn brittle while still green, wilting of leaf stalks and new shoots. Eureka! I've found symptoms exhibited by my tree.

I now believe I over watered this tree, maybe not enough to cause root rot but enough to stress the tree into a decline that eventually killed the tree or allowed something else like the emergency transplant to kill the tree. The stress that started the decline may have even happened earlier this spring when I never watered the trees because it literally rained 41 straight days and was cool and wet until mid June.

Anyway, I hope I'm not over posting or boring everyone with my long posts. And I especially hope that if I post something that's wrong, misguided, or based on my own misunderstandings you guys will pitch in and correct me. Not only for my own betterment, but also for anyone who might search the forum and run across this thread.

Happy 4th,

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Happy late 4th to you!

This is an invaluable document of your journey, indeed.

I don't have the answers, but I certainly sympathize with you. The cool, wet Spring really
could have set the downward trajectory for your tree...but I'd only be guessing.

My Trident is due for another trim....

Photobucket


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Sorry about the double post. I guess I'll have to quit using my phone to post updates and us my computer instead.

Hi Josh,
Your Trident is quite a colorful and vigorous tree. I just can't get over how fast it grows. And it's so interesting with the different colors and shapes. You've got to be proud to have brought it to this point from a seedling.

And of course, I've got a quick update for today:
I moved some trees so that they'd either get more sun or provide shade for trees that would be more happy with dappled sun. By the time I got finished moving them around the sun had moved behind the big cedar in the front yard so they were all in shape, but you can get the idea. The fence will provide partial shade from around 11 am until around 2pm at which time the Villa Taranto will provide shade to the Shishio hime, which provides shade to the Autumn Moon. Then I've raised the Red Crusader (another full sun lover) so it isn't shaded, but will provide shade to the Aureum. The Villa Taranto and the Red Crusader will be in full sun from around 2 pm until 7 pm, then they get dappled sun from the big cedar in the front yard until sunset around 9 pm when it dips behind some other trees across the road. The back yard is basically in dappled sun or bright shade from 7 pm until sunset around 10 pm this time of year.
Photobucket

The Corallinum is in full second flush swing so to speak.
Photobucket

And a photo of my first non "Japanese Maple". This is a big leaf maple. One of my wife's friends, who knows I've been growing maples, decided to dig up this seedling and give it to me. It could be an interesting tree to try to dwarf and around here I pull probably 20 big leaf seedlings out of the flower beds every year, so if I kill it, I can replace it. So I decided to experiment. Having recently read that this is a good time of year to defoliate trees in order to get back budding and smaller foliage, I cut all it's leaves off. As can be seen in the photo the experiment worked. This little guy, back budded like crazy and is putting out new leaves and shoots only 1 week from defoliation.
Photobucket

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Latest update:
Growth has really slowed on all trees. Most are still showing new buds and second/third/fourth flushes. Here's a few of my favorites

Tamukeyama 8/2/2011
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Corallinum 8/2/2011
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Red Crusader 8/2/2011
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Autumn Moon 8/2/2011
Photobucket

Shishio hime 8/2/2011
Photobucket

blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

And they're all looking fantastic...!

My Japanese Maples have slowed down, too, but my Trident Maples continue to grow vigorously.
I'll make a note to snap a pic.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Here we go!
Hasn't been pruned for nearly three weeks now ;-)
Definitely time for another trim!

Photobucket

Photobucket



Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Aug 3, 11 at 21:49

Growth hasn't slowed yet - the plants are just changing the WAY they grow. Before Father's Day (mid-Nov for Peapod), the plants expend energy mostly to extend branches and grow new leaves. With the passing of the summer solstice, changes in light's wavelengths, intensity, and duration 'alert' trees to their upcoming winter rest. We call this the tree's progression toward photodormancy. Phytochrome is a pigment and the light receptor responsible for helping the tree determine when to go dormant, and before that to stimulate a transition from expending energy on the aforementioned branch extension and foliage to storing energy - laying down carbohydrate and fat-rich cells in cambial & root tissues. The plant continues to grow, but it grows in girth instead of length.

Phytochrome exists in two forms, depending on the wavelength of light absorbed. The change in the ratio of these two forms of phytochrome occurs and can be measured on a daily basis (you can look up photomorphogenesis for a better understanding). As night length increases, and the phytochrome ratio changes, the plant gets ready for dormancy via several physiological changes, including the transition of growth habit.

I completely defoliated a trident maple forest (container planting - bonsai) about 2 weeks ago, and a new flush of smaller leaves has already taken the clipped leaves' place. I won't do any additional pruning of any significance now until after leaves fall as the plants need their foliage to lay in the energy stores for next spring's flush.

Al


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Definately time for another trim Josh. That trident is amazing. It just continues to put out new shoots and leaves with great color.

Hi Al, very informative post as always. What you're saying makes perfect sense. I assume and may have even read but it didn't sink in that this is the reason the best time to leaf prune is in early to mid July. The tree wants to store energy not make limbs and leaves, so it makes the smallest leaves necessary to get back to producing energy to store for the winter.

My Corallinum is still putting out lots of new shoots, buds, and leaves. Is there a time that I should look for it to stop or switch to the fertilizer blend you guys discussed in another thread to get the shoots to harden off so they don't get frost damage this winter?

Thanks

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hello, Blake and Al!

Indeed, Al, great post! I'd love to see an image of the Tridents, if one is available.

Thanks, Blake. It's a dynamic tree for sure....and tons of fun to have around.
Guess I'd better actually trim it before we're too late into the season... ;-)


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I've read this thread with great interest!
I have probably 80 different maples collected over the last 8 years. I've lost probably as many to drought, my shade tree being torn off by a tornado (and thrown down on my maples' bed), rabbits, dogs stomping on them, you name it.

I lost a Sanzani this year to the type of wilt you described. It broke my heart because I'd grown it from a 12" graft to a 3' tree with beautiful colors.

I have everything you've named and am very interested in your trimming. How do you know what to trim? I just let them grow.

My dilemma is that some are getting these great big root balls, but the tree themselves is slow growing. I'm transplanting them, usually in the winter, and the pots are getting bigger and bigger. I don't necessarily want to bonsai them. I don't believe in fighting a plant/tree's nature, but until they're stronger, I'd like to keep them on my porch. My only shade.

Oh - all my trees are pretty much in full, unrelenting, horrendous, southern Maryland sun. That tornado I mentioned... if they couldn't survive the sun, there wasn't a darned thing I could do. I'm slowly placing them in the landscape as they show their degree of full sun tolerance. With the drought and intense heat we've been having? Arrrrgh!

Granted, my summer colors aren't the most vibrant, but my spring and fall? Reminds me why I bought them.

Another reminder: I just put a sprinkler on them for 45 minutes in the morning. They're hanging in there, but boy I'd give anything for a shade sail or a cloudy month.

I'm going to read the threads you've referenced. I love your pictures and will try to post some of my own.

Thanks!


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi CEFreeman,

Thhanks for your interest and please feel free to post pictures of you trees.

Sounds like with 80 trees you have your hands full.

To be perfectly honest I don't "know" what to trim. If you read some of the origins of this thread, you'll see that I relied heavily on posting pictures and asking the others to comment on where and how I should cut before making the cuts. Al (tapla) and Josh (greenman28) have been very helpful throughout. After a few trees and a few "pointers/guidelines" (I don't like to call them rules anymore and neither do several books/websites I've read.), I began to experiment. One tree didn't work out well at all and now I'm waiting on it to fill back in so I can start over. A few trees have come out well, atleast to my eyes, and I think that is one of the important parts when trimming. How does it look to your eye. Other than that, the few guidelines are:
1) If you plan to keep the tree in a container (which I do) limit it's apical growth. There are many reasons for this but the key two I think are: a) if the tree gets too big it will be prone to damage caused by wind blowing it over or become too hard to move easily, b) limiting apical growth (growth on the top of the tree or at the ends of branches) causes the tree to activate dormant buds producing a fuller tree (or in my case more options to choose which new shoots to grow to produce the shape that is pleasing to my eye).
2) Trim so that there are no more than 3 preferably 2 shoots eminating from the same point. Major reason is where more than 2 or 3 shoots eminate from the same point, a buldge (don't remember the actual term) will for and this buldge isn't visually appealing. Which shoots/branches to trim to accomplish this task is entirely up to the pruner. I've found the best way to decide is to gently pull the shoot or branch out of the way to see how the tree looks without that shoot or branch. This helps, but I still make cuts that I later regret.
3) When given the choice trim at a bud that's on the bottom of a branch. The shoot eminating from that bud will usually grow upwards, producing a flat branch that is visually appealing and mimics large full grown trees.
4) Trim or remove branches that grow toward the center of the tree. Opens up the interior of the tree to sun and helps to avoid crossing branches.
5) Trim or remove crossing, dead, or damaged branches first, especially if they also fit into one of the categories above.

That's pretty much it (atleast from memory). Others may (and I hope they do) post additional guidelines or provide additional information on the guidelines I've posted.

There are also quite a few guidelines on how to make the pruning cuts to help the tree heal the wound more quickly.

The basic thing to keep in mind is how you want the tree to look and trim to that look. It's along the same premise of the bonsai technique of trim and grow.

Concerning the rootballs getting bigger and bigger. If you plan on keeping the trees in a container for more than a year or so, I'd consider reading some of Al's (tapla) great post about container soils, repotting vs. potting up, and root pruning. The basic premise of these threads (linked earlier in this thread) is to allow for healthier containerized plants.

Based on your statement that the rootballs continue to get bigger and bigger but the trees are slow growing, my guess is you're potting up and the roots have become fairly pot bound. For trees that are going to remain in containers for any length of time (even a couple years) it's important to increase the ratio of fine roots that take up water and nutrients and decrease the ratio of large roots. The large roots don't take up nutrients. The provide stability for the tree. In a container, stability isn't as important as nutrient uptake. Once transferred to the garden and root pruning doesn't take place any longer the smaller roots will develop into the larger stabilizing roots and the tree will send out roots as far as it needs in order to gather the nutrients it needs.

When root pruning, it's important to also prune the top of the tree. In a healthy tree the upper growth is balanced with the growth below ground. If there aren't enough roots to provide nutrients to the top growth, the tree will not activate some buds or quit feeding parts of the tree. If you allow the tree to decide what to feed it may shed a part you wanted to keep.

Anyway, I'm rambling on and this is all regurgitated information, so I'd encourage you to read some or all of Al's treads (especially those linked earlier in this thread). Lots of great information to be found about growing healthy trees in containers, even if you only desire to have them in containers for a short time.

As far as sun exposure goes, I believe it's more of a genetics thing than a conditioning thing. Some trees may be genetically disposed to growing in direct sun in a hot humid climate and as time passes they do well in those conditions. However, as I understand it, some trees (Aureum and Autumn Moon are examples) will never do well in full, hot, humid sun. My suggestion, it's a suggestion do with it what you will, if you want to grow those types of trees, would be to plant fast growing larger sun tolerant trees first, let them grow and then plant the shade lovers/indirect sun growers under the lager sun tolerant trees.

Anyway, thanks for showing interest, welcome aboard and please do post pics of your trees.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Appears that I named the album where I've kept pictures of my trees with a name that is easily corrupted by forum updates (according to photobucket). So unfortunately, the pics in this thread are available for viewing on photobucket but don't show here due to this possible corruption.

Since we can't edit our posts, I don't know if there is anything I can do to fix this images or not.

I'm sorry those photos aren't viewable. Kind of hard to have a journal following the development of the trees without the photos, but I guess that's my fault for naming the photobucket album with spaces.

I'll try to check in with the moderators of this forum to see if there's anything that can be done.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

End of summer/beginning of fall update:

Well I've made it to the end of my first summer with only one loss. Unfortunately, the one I did loose was one of my favorites. We have 11 "Japanese" maples (Corallinum, Fireglow, Tamukeyama, Tennyo-no-hoshi, Villa Toranto, Shishio hime, Autumn Moon, Red Crusader, Aureum, Peaches and Cream, and Green Trompenburg) and 1 "Big Leaf Maple" (given to us as a gift, but should be fun to try to dwarf). Each of these trees has its own story and each is different in its growth patterns. Now on with the update.

Corallinum
Photobucket

This tree has definitely shown the most vigor and vitality. I've cut this tree back hard atleast 4 times this year and each time it comes back more bushy. It also shows a very strong apical dominance. Although the harder I've cut it back the more buds have been activated, the new shoots always seem to start and grow quickest in very top of the tree. I'm planning on leaving it bushy for the winter. I'll prune next spring based on the amount of winter die back it has.

Fireglow:
Photobucket

When I got this tree it was about 4 1/2 to 5 feet tall. With Al's (tapla) encouragement I cut the main leader off leaving me with a very nicely shaped dwarf tree. Unfortunately this summer this tree began developing black lesions that would split open and ooze sap. Each time this happened I would remove the effected limb. While this may have saved the tree in the long run (I hope) (haven't had a lesion in 2-3 months now) it left the tree without the beautiful shape it once had. Luckily it seems to still be stong (putting on new growth routinely) and I think I can see how to reshape it. Time will tell as it continues to grow and be trimmed.

Tamukeyama
Photobucket

This tree is the only one that has actually turned into what I saw "in my mind's eye" when I saw it in the nursery. I'm excited to see it continue to grow and develop. My experience with this tree suggest it is a slow grower. It never put on a second flush of growth like most of the other trees. It also appears to respond well to wiring the young shoots to direct them into a desired shape.

Tennyo-no-hoshi
Photobucket

This tree was very twiggy and much larger when I brought it home from the nursery. When I transplanted it into the "gritty mix" in early spring, I cut it back hard. Early in spring it showed a strong apical dominance and sent long shoots out with long internode spacing from the top of the tree. A mid summer hair cut activated more of the shoots lower on the tree but none of the shoots grew much. The end result is this bushy little twig. At this time I have no "vision" for this tree. I plan to let it grow a little more next year only trimming the strong apical shoots. I'm hoping this will allow the tree show me a nice shape.

Villa Toranto
Photobucket

This tree is a little ackward. The growth on the tree isn't balanced. I've been tempted to cut the top third to half off, but have opted instead to wait and see if the tree will "grow in" as it gets older. (I'm also not sure the nursery had this tree labeled correctly. It has been green since moving into my back yard. Either it doesn't get enough sun or it isn't a Villa Toranto. It certainly is not the beautiful mix of red and light green shown in most Villa Toranto photos.

Shishio hime
Photobucket

This tree came to us a small upright bush. My wife wasn't very happy with me when I began to trim it in early summer. However, as I trimed based on a few guidelines I've learned here on the forum and expressed earlier in this thread, a pleasing shape was teased from the bush. My wife and I are both pleased with the end results and I'm very interested to see how this dwarf tree grows in over the years.

Autumn Moon
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Still a very young tree but the shape is already very pleasing to my eye. I hope this and several other very young trees in my collection make it through the winter.

Red Crusader
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Another very bushy dwarf when we got it from the nursery. I consider this tree to be my best success so far. Initially I thinned the tree. After thinning I applied wire in places and used string to pull some limbs into a more horizontal habit. The result is a very open yet healthy little tree. I'm quite happy with this tree and have high hopes for its future.

Aureum
Photobucket

Another of the very young trees in my collection. When it gets cold this winter (anytime the weather is predicted to get below freezing (which isn't often in western WA)) I will probaly pull several of the very young trees into my garage and baby them along until they're a little older and more established.

Peaches and Cream
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A little twig of a tree. My wife loved the late spring color on this tree, so for $20 I brought it home to give it a try. This is another of the trees that will likely be babied through the winter.

Green Trompenburg
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Along with the peaches and cream this is another of the non researched tree purchases made because my wife liked the pastel pink, yellow and green colors on this tree in late spring. Wasn't until I got home that I discovered this tree will grow to 35' if left to its own devices. This should be an interesting test of my ability to dwarf a tree over the years. Although it was one of the slower growers this year. It's still very young yet and may take off in a year or two (especially once replanted into gritty mixes).

Big Leaf Maple
Photobucket

One of my wife's very good friends knowing "how much (I) like maple trees" potted this seedling out of her yard and gave it to us as a gift. I couldn't bring myself to tell them I had pulled nearly 20 big leaf maple seedlings out of our own yard and threw them into the drainage ditch early this spring. For those not familar, big leaf maples are positively huge trees (similar shape and growth habit to the huge "southern plantation" oaks in the south. Their leaves are the size of dinner plates. In other words not only is this seedling not a Japanese Maple, but it also is likely to be a very big challenge to keep it small enough for my little back yard. Still as a gift I couldn't throw it away. So I decided to use it as an "experiment" tree. It was defoliated in late June and as described in many bonsai books, the defoliation activated buds up and down the tree and the leaves which grew back in are noticably smaller than the early spring leaves.

I hope anyone following along has enjoyed my first spring and summer with these trees as much as I have. Once again I'm very sorry about the picture link problems, but the photobucket albums are open to the public so please feel free to browse through the pictures there. Although I know it isn't the same as having the pictures linked with the text where the discussion is occuring, but it's unfortunately the best I can do.

As always, please feel free to post pics of your maples as the fall colors begin to start showing.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Blake,
I have thoroughly enjoyed the progress pics and updates!
The latest pics show off the different varieties quite nicely. I'll look for a few to purchase.
For your first year of pruning, you've done well. Once you've had them in your care for a couple
years, then your vision will manifest. You've established a strong structure for future work.

The Big Leaf Maple should be fun ;-)
My sister and her boyfriend dug a volunteer Silver Maple seedling out of a crack in the sidewalk.
It's kept in check by chopping it in half every year, and then defoliations by deer during the Summer.
If I had a shady slope leading down to a creek or river, I'd plant a grove of Big Leaf maple.
The growth is just so radical that I haven't tried it in a pot.

I'll dig for pics of my Trident...


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

About a week ago, I trimmed off some of the stretchy new growth....
Some of the the leaf-tips were burned during the heavy heat of August, but not too many.
Here's a pruning before and after. My notes indicate that the colors will change in November.

Photobucket


Photobucket


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks Josh,

I too have enjoyed the updates of your trident. While I am very pleased to have kept most of my young trees alive, my accomplishment pales in comparision to your work with this trident. To have raised the obviously very happy tree from a seedling is quite an accomplishment.

I'll post more updates as the fall progresses and look forward to seeing the fall color of your tree as well.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I am very happy with this tree, indeed.

You've come a long way, baby! ;-)

Photobucket


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

The trees are beginning to get fall color. So far only the Tamuke yama has had remarkable color. Many not only haven't had nice color but have rapidly switched from green to some color mixed with mostly brown.

The best color has been on the Tamuke yama. This tree went from the mostly green with deep purple margins to pure red in no more than 3 days earlier this week.
Photobucket

The Green Trompenburg started turning yellow last week and then rapidly lost most of its leaves.
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The Aureum went almost straight from green to brown and has put on a little yellow and red this week around the brown.
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The Autumn Moon has went mostly yellow rather than the golds and salmons described in most references.
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The Red Crusader is just beginning to get a redish tinge on some leaves.
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The Villa Taranto (may be Aoyagi gawa not Villa Taranto?) is turning an unremarkable yellow.
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The Tennyo no Hoshi has a couple of leaves with a dull orange that is heavily spotted with brown.
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The most recent acquisition Johin (hope this is actually a Johin, it was mostly green in late summer) went from green to yellow quickly to brown and then lost most of its leaves all in a couple of days.
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The Peaches and Cream is just beginning to change colors.
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The recently purchased replacement Sensu, the Corrallinum and the Fireglow as of yet haven't shown any fall color still proudly displaying their late summer colors. The Corrallinum is still putting on new growth. I'm sure this is why there were so many black tips on this tree when I got it in early spring last year. At this point it appears it will continue growing right up to the first freeze. Lol.

I'll try to post a few more pics this fall showing the progression of colors (assuming the colors continue and don't all brown out).

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Great updates, Blake!
Probably another three weeks before I can join you with some color.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

More fall color coming on and two new trees.

The Red Crusader is really starting to show it's fall color. The color is almost electric when the sun shines on it.
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A new dissectum named Ornatum

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Close up of its leaves, best looking of all my trees
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and the other new tree Shishigashira (Lion's Mane)
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More updates as the colors continue to change.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

A few posts back I mentioned a friend of my wife had given me a big leaf maple seedling. I mentioned then the size of big leaf maples and the size of their leaves. For those who haven't seen a big leaf maple leaf, here's one on a dinner plate with a quarter to help approximate the size.

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Now imagine a tree 50-foot tall with a 30 to 35-foot spread covered in those leaves and you can just begin to imagine why it might be hard to dwarf. LOL.
This leaf is larger than some of Al's bonsai. Wink.

Off topic, but what the heck it's my thread, I'm sure I'll get corrected if it matters. After 6 years of hand raking the leaves from the above mentioned big leaf maple and a multitude of alders and cottonwoods, as well as cedar bows from 2 huge cedars, I decided to buy myself a leaf blower to make the job easier. After 4.5 hours and 3 tanks of fuel spent trying to blow wet big leaf maple leaves out of our yard yesterday, today I had to finish the job with a rake and wheel barrow. Apparently the claimed 480 CFM from the 30cc Craftsman backpack blower isn't enough to blow around wet leaves and it's always wet in WA when the leaves are falling off the trees.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hehehe....after a good rain, I hear the local leafblowers fire up and have a laugh....
I know it's going to be an exercise in frustration for them. Of course, my laughter
turns bitter when I have to listen to those screaming/whining leafblowers for hours!!!! ;-)

Well, a few good hard freezes and my main Trident maple has colored up nicely.
If I keep it in a shady area, the color is more of a pale pink champagne on the leaves.
In full sun, the color is more purple, maroon, and varied. Again, if you like vigorous
trees, if you like to prune, if you like starting trees from cuttings, and if you like fall color
(that appears somewhat later than other maples), then a Trident maple might be
the perfect tree for you (in-ground or in a container). Without further ado....


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Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Couple of updates on the trees and other things going on.

Most of my little maples are leafless now. It has been an interesting and fun first year with my little trees and I look forward to the spring and repotting, root pruning, trimming and starting the new growth year.

Here are the latest round of pics, a couple of these are several weeks old now, but I've been remiss in my updating duties. Anyway, here they are:

Red Crusader (couple weeks old, mostly leafless now)
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Sensu: turned a rusty brown rather than the beautiful colors described in books???
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Tennyo no hoshi: turned red and then a beautiful orange (mostly leafless now)
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Lion's Mane (sorry forgot real/Japanese name)
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Corallinum: just beginning to change colors, mixture of brown spotted yellow and a peachish orange
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On another note, the large Big Leaf Maple that had been the bane of my fall for the last 6 years is no more. One of the multiple trunks fell across the neighbors garage so the owner took down the whole tree. Sad to see a large old tree have to be taken down, but glad I don't have to rake those giant, heavy, rain soaked leaves any longer.

Maybe one more update this fall, but more than likely I'll see you in the late winter or early spring when I begin mixing massive amounts of gritty mix to transplant most of the trees. The plan at this point is to move the Fireglow and Johin into extra large cedar containers (30-inch I believe). Remember, I didn't root prune the Fireglow this spring. The Tennyo no hoshi will be planted down into a smaller container (turns out this is a quite slow growing tree and I can make better use of the 20-inch cedar container it's in). The Corallinum and Tamukeyama will remain in their 20-inch cedar containers. All the rest will be either bare rooted, root pruned and moved into cedar containers with 1,1,1 gritty mix or bare rooted, root pruned and put into 5,1,1 gritty mix in temporary containers until they get a little older.

See you then,
Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

A little playfull update.

Dwarfed maples in the winter.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Very nice, Blake!
I saw that there were new pics added to your photobucket album....and I was wondering
what you'd have to offer us here! A great coverlet of snow!

I've been screening bark to make a fresh batch of mix for my Trident.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Welcome back. My maples are just beginning to show bud swell so it is definitely time to get some repotting done.

First on the list was a Johin I was able to get late last year. It was in a 5 - 7.5 gallon nursery pot and was about 5 to 7 foot tall when I got it. The nurseryman and I cut the main trunk back to about 2 foot and then trained one of the branches up as a new leader. This left an unsightly gap between the first "whirl" on the tree and the new leader "whirl". However, I knew this spring I would be repotting, root pruning and doing some heavy limb pruning so I wasn't too upset.

First job was to get some new cedar pots.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

The next job was to drill drain holes in the bottom of the new cedar pots and cut a stainless steel screen to keep the gritty mix in the pot.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Next I mixed up a large batch of the gritty mix, wet it thoroughly and formed a mound in one of the extra large cedar pots.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

As shown in this next picture, I formed the mound so that the top of the mound was about 4 inches lower than the rim of the pot. This allows me to set the tree on top of the mound, spread out the roots around the mound and still have about 2 inches from the soil surface to the rim of the pot once the back fill is complete.
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Here's the patient.
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Buds just beginning to swell.
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When I pulled the tree from it's plastic pot, I noticed there were very few roots showing and the soil looked new and had a slight sour smell to it. My first thought was the tree had recently been potted up at a nursery. My next thought was I probably got to this tree just in time as I'm guessing the sour smelling soil was not a good thing.
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The outer 2 inches of soil basically fell off with little effort confirming in my mind a recent "pot up", probably last year just prior to my purchase. after knocking off the outer couple of inches I sawed off the bottom 1/3.
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From here the going got rough. The soil was very compacted and the roots were all twisted and crossing each other, growing first in one direction then the other. Many of the large roots were girdling each other. My guess based on what I saw and how the roots seemed to be formed was that this tree had been potted up probably three times during it's life at a nursery. The tree was left to grow in about a 1 gallon pot for so long that the roots had begun to circle the 1 gallon pot. Then it was potted up into probably a 2 or 3 gallon, where it was left to grow until the roots had begun to circle the pot again. Then most recently it was potted up into the container it was in when I purchased it. I had to remove alot of large roots between the diameter of a dime and a nickel. Some of these roots were very gnarled and where girdling each other so badly that I had to just cut them all out and hope I wasn't removing too much of the root mass.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

After getting the roots cleaned up, I quickly placed the tree on top of the mound of gritty mix I'd made in the pot and began to add soil, doing my best to poke the soil down into all the voids in the root mass. Then I filled the pot the rest of the way with prewetted gritty mix and tied the tree off using some garden twine. Finally, I gave the newly repotted tree a healthy hair cut.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Based on my experiences last year, I'm hopefull that this tree will back bud and I'll eventually be able to reduce the leader down to some of the new shoots.

Next up on the agenda was the Fireglow which I had hastily repotted last year just as leaves were beginning to break out of the buds. I hadn't done a very good root prune last year, and I knew I had this one to redo this year. I didn't take many pictures of the process from here on out, seeing how the process has been covered fairly well in the thread now.

Here's the repotted and pruned Fireglow.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Next I moved my Tennyo-no-hoshi from a large cedar container into a smaller cedar container. When I had repotted this tree last year it was mislabeled and I put it into a pot much too large for it. I think the smaller pot will fit it's slow growing smaller status much better.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Next I put my Villa Taranto into the large cedar container vacated by my Fireglow. The root mass on this tree was in better condition than the Johin, but it still had many circling and "j" roots which I removed. To balance the amount of roots I removed I gave this tree a healthy hair cut as well.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

And the last one for tonight. I moved the Shishio Hime from it's one gallon pot into the 2 gallon pot previously occupied by the Villa Taranto. The root mass on this tree was in very good shape and I didn't have to remove very much at all. Accordingly, I only lightly pruned out some "winter kill" spots and shortened some of last year's shoots to give the tree and overall balance.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

The Shishio hime is a little closer to spouting leaves than I realized, but I think I caught it in time.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

I still have 4 or 5 trees that I plan to repot this year. So if anyone sees this in the next day or two and wants to see pictures of a specific part of the process, feel free to ask and I'll try to snap some shots.

For now I'm fairly whipped, so I think I'm going to grab a show and head to bed.

Hope you enjoyed the update and it's nice to see buds swelling. Looking forward to another year of learning, sharing and shaping our wonderful little trees.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Welcome back, Blake!

Great job with the re-potting. I really like what you've done with these trees.

I re-potted my Trident Maple on January 18th. Took it out of the plastic pot and
put it into a larger, terracotta fern/azalea pot. I pot this one before the others
because it begins to bud much sooner. New leaves are emerging.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 4, 12 at 15:12

Great job Blake. You took to the repotting business like a duck to water!

Keep after the top of your trees aggressively, pruning the top back much harder than you think they need. Maples are so apically dominant that more than half the energy they make will be directed toward the top quarter of the tree if you don't take an active part in restraining them.

Also - I see you have some areas where 3 branches emerge from the same point. Avoiding that condition will go a long way toward creating a more refined tree.

Again - great job!

Al


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey, Al, good to see ya!

Well, here are a few pics of this year's start to the maple season. The Trident's
always push new growth first in my neck of the woods...but I'm not complaining in the least! ;-)

After last year's growth, I was left with a twiggy skeleton and multiple "barbells,"
due to my failure to prune out one or the other branch at opposite sides of the trunk.

So that's what I did first - removed the majority of the branches, along with the top of the tree.
Then I set about the process of making a fresh mix, bare-rooting, and re-potting into terracotta.

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Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi guys, thanks for the welcome back and thanks for the kudos.

Josh, the Trident is coming along very nicely. I like the basic shape you've got started. I'm certainly looking forward to following along as you continue your "contianer arborist" work with this guy. Great pictures of your version of the gritty mix as well. I see some turface (or similar product), some pumice, bark and maybe perlite. I assume this mix holds a little more water to help out in your warmer NorCal environment.?

Al, with all the work you've put in on these forums sharing your wealth of knowledge, you've made it easy to "(take) to the repotting business like a duck to water". Sincerely, thank you for all you do to help us all grow happier and healthier plants. This year will be a little more challanging as I begin to refine the shape with my pruning rather than making heavy shape forming pruning cuts. I hope I'm up for the challenge. I'll be sure to take another look at the trees and prune them back to only two branches per node. Looking back at the pictures I posted, there are a few places where I'm not sure if the angle of the picture is misleading or I just missed a branch here and there.

Looking through the remainder of my trees this morning, I have 4 that I'm for sure going to repot this year and a couple others that I may leave for 1 more year or may repot this year. We'll see how it goes. I've got 7 in containers that they'll likely live in for years to come. Agressive shaping and root pruning should keep these trees happy and healthy as long as the containers hold together. I've got two more to move into cedar containers this spring and atleast two to repot into larger plastic nursery pots this spring.

So far this spring I've gone through 2 bags of #2 Cherry Stone, 1 1/2 bags of Turface MVP and 2 bags of mini nugget bark. I still have 1 full bag and part of a second bag of Chery Stone, 1 1/2 bags of Turface and 2 bags of mini nugget bark. So I'm hoping I can get through the remaining planned repots this spring with my dwindling supplies.

With any luck, I'll get the remainder of the planned repots done and get some more pictures up later this week.

Thanks to you both for following along and sharing your knowledge and experiences.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey, Blake, thanks!
Likewise, this'll be a great year to follow your numerous maples! ;-)

This mix is Fir bark, Perlite, Turface, Lava rock, and Quartz. You are correct
that it approximates the Gritty Mix, but probably holds a touch more moisture. With maple
and conifer mixes, I tend to go just a bit heavier on the Fir bark. I don't know if this will
work in all climates, but my experience has been very positive so far!

Back when I pruned my Trident, I took two cuttings and stuck them in a different maple's pot.
Those cuttings are leafing out now, and I hope they'll root well.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Blake and Josh, My story is identical to Blake's in regard to falling for container trees and Japanese Maples in particular. I've very much enjoyed reading all your threads and viewing your pics and I hope to add pics of my small collection. Last summer I got started when I was given 4 japanese maples that were nearly dead and repotted them at the time in MG potting mix and later on found this site and Al's gritty Mix and all his other wonderful container forum Post.. I've since acquired 6 more Japanese Maples and repotted three in the gritty mix with hopes of getting two more in the gritty mix before bud break. Anyways just wanted to say hi and hopefully get involved in this process and LEARN LOTS as we go ;) ... I have 2 Shishigashira, 2 Waterfall, 2 Crimson Queens, and 4 unknowns (thinking one is bloodgood by color and look of leaves)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Josh, good luck with the little cuttings. I've heard it's quite hard to get Japanese maples to root from cuttings, so I'll be interested to see how these come out. Perhaps it's only the palmatums which are hard to root from cuttings???

joshuac1v8, welcome aboard. Looking forward to seeing some pictures and sharing experiences.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Welcome, indeed, Joshuac1v8!

Blake, Trident Maples root very easily from cuttings, thankfully.
In the last pic above, the little maple in the light green container is a cutting
that was rooted last year. The only time Trident cuttings fail for me is when an animal
digs them up and exposes the young roots.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Sounds like I need to find a Trident or two. ;-)

Palmatums and Shirasawanums are reported to be quite hard to root from cuttings (or airlayer for that matter). One of the reasons these species are seldom used for bonsai. The grafts make for "ugly" trunks. But man do they make for some interesting shapes and the leaves can be down right awesome.

Been a very busy week, hopefully I'll get the rest of the repots done tomorrow evening and get some pictures up.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I've finished (or atleast mostly finished) my repots for this year. Some went well and I was able to clean up the roots realitively easy. Others were a real beast. I have to say this year I was a little more at ease with the root pruning. After seeing how little roots the Coralinum had last year and how well it performed, I found myself more willing to remove more of the "problem" roots and thick roots when performing the root pruning part of the repot.

Here's some before and after shots of the trees that were repotted this week:

Red Crusader: (very badly root bound, many circling and "j" roots, had to remove much of the root mass and therefore much of the top, dissapointed to remove so much)
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Ornatum (this is a dissectum (weeping) variety but has a high graft)
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Shishigashira (Lion's Mane) (very upright tree) (wife wouldn't let me remove the middle branch although I should to keep it to no more than 2 branches per node)
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Sensu (this is a replacement tree for the Sensu I lost last year, unfortunately this tree is no were near as shapely as the one I lost, but in time I'm sure it will become a nice tree)
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

And now for a before and after of the Coralinum. This tree was chopped back to almost just the trunk last year and had to be pruned continuously all summer to keep it from turning into a bush. As you can see it had bushed up again by the late fall and was left that way incase I had any winter die back. Now we're through (or atleast should be through with the freezing temperatures) it's time to give this tree it's spring trimming.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
And after pruning out many "unshapely" shoots and cutting back the remaining shoots to two nodes.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

And last but not least the remainder of the trees that made it through winter. I left all my trees bunched together under a large cedar that resides in my backyard to protect them from wind. Unfortunately we had a major winter storm (major for us) with 15 inches of snow followed by freezing rain. Lots of major damage to trees, powerlines, etc. I lost an Autumn Moon to this storm and had some winter die back on most of the other trees. Without further ado, here's the rest of my trees:

Tamukeyama
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Peaches and Cream
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Green Trompenburg
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Aureum
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And my newest (still very young (graft still showing)) tree. My wife bought me a Shaina for our Wedding anniversary.
Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App

Hope you enjoyed the update, thanks for following along and I'm looking forward to seeing some of your updates as well.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Always enjoy these updates!
Great looking trees, Blake. They're developing very well.

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Great pics Blake & Josh and hope your trees do well this season :) ... here are my trees and any input is appreciated and respected (im just learning as i go and getting most of my knowledge from reading Al's post). Im not very sure on how to prune or what your meaning when you talk about "cutting back to only two nodes" hope ya"ll enjoy my pics and looking forward to any advice you can give.

This is one of my Waterfalls.. it and a couple others budded out so quickly I missed my opportunity to root prune and repot in gritty so guessing i'll wait til next spring to do so??
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these are my two Shishigashiras. Not so sure how to go about pruning these since they grow so upright? AND seem to put out stems from everywhere, at least the two I have anyway
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Back view
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close up of the 13yr Cicada Swarm damage from the last summer. Is the branch worth keeping as it will heal but have scar or better to just remove all together?(i think i know the answer here but im just very timid in removing branches in general.. but im sure it would be best removed)
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2nd Shishigashira
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stems seem to come from all sides of the branches on this one and Im sure that can't be good but not sure if its just natural growth habit or poor nursery care
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This is 2nd Waterfall and it is very tall with a very thick trunk but a bad(ugly) graft knot at base and a few of the limbs seem to turn back in on itself and are pressed right against trunk?? thought of possibly layering above the graft to have a cleaner trunk but not sure how hard of a process it may be..
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These next four i recieved as gifts from a friend who is in the landscape business and recovers saplings from under clients mature trees then grows them on for resale but this last summer these were badly neglected to the point of being dead and so they were given to me FREE :) and did the best i could for them and they seemed to bounce back great..now Im trying to get them into gritty mix before they leaf out
i have know idea what type they are but two are red and two have green leaves.. think this smallest one may be bloodgood.
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I also think the ones above where fertilized too heavily and that is why they grew the strong leaders, Im guessing.
this one below is fairly tall and has green leafs with slight red tint.
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this one below is my favorite of the four, it is red leaf and has nice branch structure to me.. it was badly dried out when i recieved it and has splits in the trunk from it and the top died back last summer.. i like how it is leaning(even though its only that way from neglect lol) thought of trying to make it a bonsai
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here you can see the split wood at the base but it has healed a lot from over the summer and i hope it closes soon.
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this is a small crimson queen that also budded out before i could repot
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2nd view
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and lastly this crimson queen i found priced for $15! in a 50% sale.. it was priced wrong i think and prob should have been $150 but who was i to argue ;) its trunk is almost 3in and very thick but all lower branches have been removed :( but for that price i couldnt leave it.
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its rootball is so large im gonna hate to try root pruining it but i can tell its badly root bound in the container.. it seems to have been dug b&b and put in container but never sold(maybe why it was priced so low, but seems in decent health overall) im afraid to see what roots look like though. I thought of just planting in ground but for now dont have the right spot for it so thought i'd just repot till then..
Okay so there you have it my lil collection. I'd love to have some of the others that I've seen here but they'll have to wait for now :) I'll repost more pics as they fully leaf out and hope I havent bored everyone with such a long post.
Also when I repot(root prune) should I trim down the upper branches a whole lot or can they stay? I took off a considerable amount of the 2 Shishigashiras root mass because they were so bad and lost of circling and j hooks.. but I didnt trim top at all. I notice Blake seems to trim down his tops a good bit and wondered if it was just his preference or a must to keep tree healthy? Thanks Everyone for the advice and hope you enjoyed my pics


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

WOW i just rechecked my post and realized how extremely large the pics are.. sorry about that its my first time posting pics


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks Josh and joshuac1v8.

joshuac1v8- many of your trees are much further along than any of mine and are shaping up nicely. Thanks for sharing and I'm by no means bored with your post.

I'll make my response in three parts to hopefully be more understandable.

1) Overall pruning thoughts.
Trees in containers should be pruned regularly for a couple of reasons. A) Containerized trees have no way of holding themselves up against wind. When growing in the ground, trees spread out two different kinds of roots. Some of the roots are for support against wind and some of the roots are for nutrient uptake(I'll get to these in a minute). In the ground, trees make the roots for support large enough to support themselves against the conditions they normally face. A tree in the middle of a grove may not have as large or as strong of support roots as a lone tree in the middle of a field open to strong winds. The tree in the grove has many trees around it to share the brunt of the wind. The lone tree in a field has to support itself against the full force of the wind. In containers trees can only send out roots as wide as the size of the container. Thus if we allow the top of the tree to get larger than the weight the container can hold on the ground, the tree can easily be toppled by winds, potentially causing damage to the tree. So we need to keep the top of the tree in check with the container size. B) Just as trees in the ground can send out as many and as large of support roots as they need for their prevailing conditions, they also can send out as many nutrient transport roots as they need to get the nutrients they need for healthy growth. In poor soils they may have many nutrient transport roots that reach far away from the tree to get to as many nutrients as they need. Likewise in good soils the tree may not need as many nutrient transport roots to support the tree's healthy growth. However, in containers, the tree only gets to put out as many roots as the size of the container to get nutrients. In very small or shallow pots (like bonsai pots) the root mass may be so small that it is carefully trimmed to remove all of the larger support roots to allow as many nutrient transport roots as possible to take up nutrients from the shallow/small amount of soil. To provide support bonsai are often wired into their pots so the larger roots can be removed without the tree falling over.

So containerized trees should be pruned to keep them from blowing over and to match the top with the size the root mass can support with enough water and nutrients.

2) Should you prune the top of the trees you've root pruned.
When trees are root pruned during the quescient (may be the wrong spelling) period, this is the period after the tree has met it's chill requirement but prior to the tree beginning to push new leaves, the tree will only activate as many buds as the root mass can support. If you don't prune the top to approximately an equal amount as you've pruned the bottom the tree will make the decision about which buds to activate for you and you may not like which limbs/buds the tree decides to "kill". So by pruning you get to choose which buds are activated and therefore how the tree will be shaped.

3) How to prune.

This is largely subjective as what size container the tree will be in, what shape you want the tree to take, and what the ultimate plan for the tree must all be taken into account.

The first couple of questions are 1) do you plan to keep these trees in containers? & 2) what are the ultimate size containers you desire? one's you can move around? large landscape containers that will remain in place for ever?

If I may be so presumptious, if you plan to keep these trees in containers, I would think about keeping them under 5' or 6' max. Reason being, trees in containers will always need to be repotted periodically (with a proper root and branch prune) to keep them healthy. As Al has pointed out previously, large trees in large containers begin to be difficult to move around, difficult to protect from winter weather/wind/ice/snow storms and difficult to perform proper repots.

With the above stated, and with your permission, I will try very hard in the next couple of days to copy a couple of your pictures to suggest where I would prune the trees you've already repotted and where I would prune the trees that haven't been repotted. Once again this would be subjective and you could choose to follow my advice or make cuts of your own. Depending on how much of the root mass you've removed (hard to know without pictures) and the timing of your repot (had the tree already began to activate buds prior to your root prune) the tree will either continue to grow the leaves which were activated prior to your root pruning and then begin to wilt because it can no longer support this many leaves or at its own discression decide which buds to activate.

The smaller seedlings, I would move into a 5-1-1 mix prior to the buds being activated. This will help with the health of the young trees, allow you to sort out the young roots without having to remove large, circling or "j" roots and not be as costly as multiple repots in the 1-1-1 mix (these young seedlings will likely be replanted multiple times over the next 5 or 6 years).

Anyway, it's late and my dad's in the hospital, so I need to go for now, but I'll do my best to get back to you with some pruning suggestions in the next day or so, if you wish, and some of the other guys don't beat me to it.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

What an awesome response Blake! People like yourself, AL! and Josh make me so glad i found this site a couple months ago.
I'm willing to take any and all advice you have time for and want to give.. cropping the pics to show your cut suggestions is a great idea Whenever! You get the time(i know its time consuming) Your response was right on target and I know I will need to prune back the 2 Shishigashiras just have a hard time deciding where to cut in fear of messing it all up lol but guess thats part of learning.

The trees for the most part are pretty far along. I found most of them at the same Nursery for sale at up to 75%.. i bought the 2 Waterfalls($30 EACH), 2 Crimson Queens($15 for large & $25 for smaller and 2 Shishigashiras ($30 EACH) which to me was a STEAL.. none i bought are less than 2 1\2 tall and just as wide. I would like them to be as large as possible with out putting them in danger AND preserving my Back ;)

Im going to pick up some Foliage Pro today and hopefully repot one or two time in the next couple days (time and bud break allowing) and this time i'll take root pics too.. I trimmed back the 2 Lion's Mane really heavy but they were so tight and twisted. The buds were swelling but None had opened yet and now A Lot seem to be opening and i hope it doesnt cause die back before I can decide which branches to take off.

One last question. I've read lots of places that you never want to prune a JMs in spring because of sap loss and only do pruning in late or mid Summer?? have you found this to be true or think I could go ahead and prune now? Maybe they are meaning after it has fully leafed out?
I regret hearing of your Father in the Hospital and will keep your family in my prayers.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Joshua, I'll give your highly branched trees some thought, too.

Blake, take care, and I hope all goes well with your father.

See you fellows a little later.

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks! Josh.. Also just wanted to add that the Largest Crimson Queen is 3ft 6in tall, 5in trunk caliper 4in from soil level.

I wanted to be correct on that so I went and measured instead of guessing. Im not sure the right direction to take with this one since its so large. I think it would be awesome if I could it in bonsai size(since it has such a thick trunk)or get branches lower down the trunk, but not sure how well a Crimson Queen would bonsai? guess its no different than any other??

Anyway just wanted to add that because it is in strong bud swell now and will prob break in the next three days i think


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

joshuac1v8,

Here's my first take. Understand that it's hard to get a feel for the 3D space of the tree from a picture and some of my shown cuts may not be cuts I would make if I was standing next to the tree.

First let's start with a little tree pruning terminology.
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In the picture above, the yellow "arrows" are pointing toward nodes, the blue line/arrow is pointing toward "internode length" and the red "arrow" is pointing to a node from which multiple branches eminate, aka "whirl".

Some general pruning suggestions for most trees. (1) remove extra branches so that only two (no more than three) branches eminate from each node. (2) remove damaged/diseased branches. (3) remove one or both crossing branches. (4) remove branches that point back toward the interior of the tree. (5) remove branches which will eventually impede or cause damage to the trunk or other branches.

The ultimate goal of pruning containerized trees is to keep the tree manageable while still providing a pleasing shape. To accomplish this goal we can borrow some techniques from bonsai culture. Generally, we want our trees to either reflect a specific look (bonsai shapes) or reflect what the tree would look like if full sized. You can bend, cut, shape etc the tree to look like an animal, to have a specific shape or to look exactly like a minature version of the full sized adult.

For the most part, I want my miniture container specimens to look like small versions of the full sized adult. You can accomplish this by looking for pictures of the full size tree and shaping to look like the full size.

A few methods borrowed from bonsai culture to accomplish this are:
1) prune branches (will take multiple prunings over several/many years to accomplish) so that they mirror the natural taper of the full sized version. The first step to accomplish this is to hack the branch/trunk back once it has reached the desired thickness. Then you let one of the buds grow into a branch/trunk that is a step down in size from the main branch/trunk thickness and hack it back (usually to two nodes). This process continues until the trunk or branch is as long as you want it to be. 2) Then you begin to pinch buds to encourage short internodes and multiple branching to create the leaf pads. This is called "finishing" the tree, and most of my trees are not at this point. Some of yours may be at the beginning of the finishing stage but need pruning to determine the finished shape. Then you can begin to pinch buds to create the branch termination (leaf pads) (I know there's an actual name but it escapes me at the moment.).

So now for you Shishigashiras. I think these have nice thickness in the trunk and main branches but are at the stage where you need to work on taper. Shishigashiras have naturally short internode spacing and put off many leaves/leaf pads at each node, creating a "skeleton" covered in many leaves type shape rather than the normal "Maple" shape.

Without further ado, here's how I think I might start to work on taper and shape in your Shishigashiras. Once again I must state that I can't see these trees in 3D and found it much harder to determine which branches to prune than I would if I were standing over it, so your view may be different. Also, it's your tree and this is my suggestion. I want to be helpful but your goal and vision for the tree may be different than what I see. One last disclaimer, I am in no way an expert or even experienced container arborist/bonsai pruner. I'm willing to make cuts some might not make. I make cuts that more experienced people may not make, but I'm willing to make the cut, learn from what happens when I make the wrong cut (hopefully) and give the tree time to grow back out and correct mistakes I may make.

If I haven't scared you off by now, here's how I would cut the Shishigashiras based on what I can see in the pictures.
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My first suggestion would be to wait and see if Al/Josh have a chance to review my suggested pruning cuts and if they provide any further input.

Then if you decide to start down this path, make small cuts first. Maybe start by removing branches so that you have no more than two branches per node. The continue by cutting limbs back a few nodes at a time for all the branches on the entire tree, then maybe cut some more until you reach no less than two nodes per branch. Then begin to remove entire branches. Take time in making each pruning cut. View the tree from multiple angles and make sure you like the 3D shape of the tree. Remember, at this stage, you're building the general shape of these trees not finishing them. You're aiming to get a general tapered shape (narrow at the top and wide at the bottom). I have one tree which is exactly opposite but it's an exception not a rule (and many bonsai guys will not like this shape as it doesn't fit into their predefined shapes).

Hope this helps. I'll try to get some more of your trees looked at over the next couple of days.

PS thanks for the kind thoughts about my dad guys. He had blood clots(not plaque) in multiple locations on his heart. They "roto rootered" the veins/arteries with blood clots and he is in stable condition now.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I Truly appreciate your time and consideration of cuts to make.. When I found your thread I was thrilled that someone wanted to basically do exactly the same with their trees as I do with mine(grow them bigger than bonsai but still maintain in pots)

And the back and forth debate is something I need to help decision making and Hope to add some thoughts/advice of my own along the way. I don't expect you to have the perfect answer by any means and the advice you gave was great and highly informative in my opinion. I am only a beginner myself and just enjoy the conversations and observations Most of All :)

Glad to hear your dad is doing better and hope he back on his feet soon.. Thanks for your input again and im off to make some Cuts!


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi joshuac1v8,

Glad to be part of the conversation and to have a couple of guys to share experiences with.

By the way, I ran across the term I was looking for the other night in reference to "finishing" the look of the tree and making it look more "twiggy" (to borrow Al's aptly used term from another thread). The proper term for what I was trying to describe is "Ramification".

I think most of my trees are still a long ways from needing to work on ramification. I have a few that I'll start trying to shorten internode length this year, but none that the focus will be on ramification.

Anyway, I've got a birthday party for a dear friend to attend tonight. Afterwards, I hope to get back to you with some pruning for the remainder of your trees.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Okay the following are final goal type pruning cuts. You could start making some of these cuts this year if you choose, but I might prune less this year and really begin to prune for shape after you find out how much of the roots have to be removed when you do a full repot.

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In this picture make cuts at the red marks. In the circled areas, prune back to two nodes, and at the arrows, pick on of the limbs that seems to fit the 3d shape of the tree and cut the rest.

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Remove limbs as shown.

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Cut as shown. Big cuts, but if you make the big chop at a bud back toward the left, the tree will begin to develop one of the bonsai shapes I really like.

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This one is near the point where you can begin ramification. I'd remove limbs as shown and in the remaining area, make sure you have no more than two limbs per node and two nodes per limb.

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The above two trees, all I'd do is prune back to two branches per node and two nodes per branch.

As always, minor cuts at first until you feel more comfortable with where you're going with the cuts.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I wish I had some advice to share, but I'm more than a little overwhelmed by the number of trees.
One candidate at a time would be more manageable. I'm hoping that Al will stop by, as well.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Josh,
There are alot of trees. I've been trying to pick through them a couple at a time to help joshuac1v8 with some suggestions. It's harder than I thought it would be to make suggestions based on pictures.

joshuac1v8,
Here's another option for one of the trees I showed above.
Once some of the pruning cuts are healed, this option would provide some nice taper to the trunk making the tree look much older than it is.

Make cuts at the red marks and train the branch that the red arrow is pointing toward up as the new leader.
Photobucket

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Im sorry for throwing so much at you guys at once, just excited to get something started and don't have as much experience as you all. I just thought I'd post all the trees on here and gain advice as time permitted. And I do hate that Pictures dont do much justice in the way of presenting the true shape of the trees.

I did want to ask if there were any books you might suggest to gain more insight into overall care and shaping of small trees, I'd like to feel more useful in our conversations but my technical knowledge isn't so far along just yet.

Again thanks for Any Advice no matter how small. I trimmed up the Shishigashiras and hope to do more this weekend, will post updated pics soon (and not so many this time) ;)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

It's all good. We'll just have to work together to get you where you want to be. I understand and appreciate your enthusiasm and don't want you to get discouraged. Hang in there and we'll get there.

Most of the cuts I've suggested previously were loosely based on a Chinese method called "Cut and Grow". It helps to (1) keep the tree smaller and (2) give it that older finished look. Maples are generally very apically dominate (means they have very strong growth on the top). You'll have to keep that in check and as Al has told me previously "prune the top more than you'd think" to control that apical dominance. Cutting the top hard and regular and frequent pruning in the top is the only way to get these guys to back bud lower on the tree so that it looks nice as a smaller tree.

One other thing I'd suggest (it was suggested to me and I found out it works well to keep the tree in check) is to fertilize very lightly. You will need to fertilize some in the 1-1-1 mix because it is basically sterile, but do so sparingly and as Al says "weakly, weekly". I found when I fertilized at between 1/4 and 1/8 the recommended dosages, my trees had huge internode spacing. It was only after I cut that back to like 1/16 to 1/32 the recommended dosages that the I started to get shorter internode spacing. Also I pretty much cut nearly all the early spring growth off and kept the growth that comes in mid summer. The internode spacing was much closer. Also, I kept feeding a couple of the trees into September and paid the price because those trees were still putting on new shoots in November. The first frost pretty much killed all those young shoots.

As far as books or suggested places to gain insight, I'll copy and paste the advice Al (tapla) gave me around a year ago when I was in your same shoes.

"I think John Naka's Bonsai Techniques I and BT II are about the best as far as clarifying design standards; and I like Deb Koreshoff's Bonsai and her concise line drawings as a close second. As far as the horticultural part, I was greatly influenced by the texts of Dr Alex Shigo, and the co-authors Kozlowsky/Pallardy and their texts on the physiology of woody plants.
The number of people that leave their bonsai endeavors behind roughly equals the number of people that decide to test the waters. The 'revolving door' phenomenon reflects the frustration so many discover in trying to maintain a collection with 'revolving trees'. You have to be able to keep your trees alive & healthy or you soon become discouraged. I went through it in the beginning, but I was so enamoured of the little trees that I didn't give up.

You first have to understand the plant:soil relationship to excel at bonsai or container gardening. You can be ok, but you can't be accomplished without that understanding. You need to know what makes plants tick - how they work and how they will react to what you subject them to. You get that through studying plant physiology and learning traits of individual species and cultivars. It's important to understand How Plant Growth is Limited, and how to minimize limiting factors to the greatest degree possible. Finally, you have to be willing to put some effort into it. They don't hand out green thumbs for sitting on our cans & worrying about how we can do things 'easier', or for relying on 'tried and true' methods that by today's standards might be considered mediocre. A green thumb requires work, innovation, and both the willingness and ability to adapt and think on your feet. If you have those attributes & a love of husbandry, but don't already have a green thumb - it's probably not all that far away.

Al"

Much of the understanding Al describes above can be found in the container gardening forum, in Al's former posts. I found a lot of information just by searching a specific term and "tapla". I've also found information by searching youtube and google for bonsai pruning/shaping techniques and root pruning. Lots of info out there, temper it with the info you find by doing searches with "tapla" on this board and you'll have a very good start to gaining some of the information you seek.

By the way I've read Deborah Koreshoff's "Bonsai, its art, science, history and philosophy" and Alex Shigo's "A New Tree Biology". The first is a very interesting read, the second is dry but loaded with information about how trees heal wounds. Dr. Shigo also wrote books covering the topics of tree care, pruning, arboriculture and myths. You can still obtain his entire library of books for around $400 from a website in his name.

Anyway, long post, hope I didn't overwhelm you with information.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

joshuac1v8,

Here's a website I had saved in my favorites and forgot about. The information seems to line up well with Deborah Koreshoff's book. It's also presented in an easy to understand format.

Blake


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RE: Link

Helps if I remember to actually post the link.

Here is a link that might be useful: Bonsai Shaping (also applies to trees in containers)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks Blake,

I'll check that out. I have pruned half of my trees and a couple of repots.. just havent had time to upload pics yet but will in next few days. Hope all is well for you, all my trees but one have fully leafed out and it ends up that I think the taller Crimson Queen is actually a Red Dragon I think.. at least its leaves and color seem so (so im happy about that, didnt like have so many of the same trees)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

My little Shishio hime was the first into leaf this year. 3 or 4 others have major bud swell. Based on photos from last year I would expect to have many pictures to share within the next couple weeks. 8-)

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March 30, 2012

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April 5, 2012

Until next time.
Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Very nice shades of color, Blake!

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Buds are swelling...several trees are starting to put on a show.

The Shishio hime is not only the first of my trees into leaf, it is really putting on a show.

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The Peaches N Cream is also beginning to put on it's first flush.
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I also purchased three new trees today, an Aka shigitatsu sawa, an Ukigumo and an Autumn Moon to replace the one I lost in a snow and ice storm we had this year.

Below are some pictures of the trees as I brought them home and after some basic shape pruning.

Aka shigitatsu sawa
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Close up of leaves:
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After pruning:
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And a top down view:
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Ukigumo
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After pruning:
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Top down:
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Autumn Moon:
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After pruning:
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Top down:
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Until next time

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey guys. Just found this sub forum and feel like playing in this thread. I have just bought two JM's, a geisha gone wild, and a autumn full moon this last Saturday. I have some of the same goals that you guys have and few different ones as well.

I have started getting interested with growing trees in containers because I want to grow some oaks from acorns. I have a large yard (big for my area, 1/3 acre) and a few large dogs so I feel the need to grow the trees in containers so that they get hardy and a bit bigger before I release them to the big bad world. I have 10 bur oak seedlings (12"-18") in my refrigerator as well as about 75 viable oak acorns (northern red, bur, and pin.) I would like to grow these in containers to plant in my yard, to give to friends and family, and to donate to the neighborhood park across the street. I would also like to bonsai some of the oaks.

Other than getting huge, the good fall color of oaks is what I am interested in. This is why I also started to look at JM's. I think that the two JM's that I bought will look nice all year but should have good fall interest as well.

I haven't quite gotten my setup complete. I am still trying to decide where to place the plants in my yard so that I can protect from the dogs and am also waiting for some pots that should be here this week. I'll get some better pics of my JM's tonight and post them up and when I get the oaks potted I'll add some pics of those if you don't think it would be too big of a diversion. I am wasting tons of time at work looking at all the pics of JM's trying to decide which to go after next. Its great fun.

Here are a few bad camera phone pics for now.

Here is a link that might be useful: New Saplings


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Welcome aboard. Couple of nice looking young maples you've got there. Fair warning (and it sounds by the ending to your post you may have been bitten by the bug), buying and growing maples is quite addictive. There's over 600 cultivars of Acer Plamatum and that's only one of the 23 Acer species that inhabit the islands of Japan.

Thanks for sharing and I look forward to following along as you grow and shape your trees.

PS, while the title and the intention of the thread is to follow the growth of Maples, you are more than welcome to share your Oaks as well.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Sanactified! Where did you order them from? I think I am getting the Maple fever and could use a few more..lol

Peapod...Very nice. I LOVE all your trees and this thread. Thank you:-)

Mike


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thank you Mike!

My Acers are just at the beginning of their spring show. All are in various stages of bud swell or bud break. I've already started pinching buds on many. I hope I get this ramification thing correct.

Lots of bud pinching and heavy pruning in the top from now until mid summer. Hopefully I be able to increase twigginess (sp)in the tops and branch thickness in the lower branches.

I never realized until I started, just how much fun (sometimes stressful) but mostly fun and educational this hobby would be.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Mike-
I actually found the JM's locally. I was cruising a local nursery for some used planting containers and saw that they were restocking the JM display. I had spent a good portion of last week looking at all the online websites finding the ones I like preparing to make and order and was pleasantly surprised to see they had some I wanted. These were $30 each but they also had larger sized for $70 although I didn't want to spend that much. The Geisha Gone Wild in the larger size was fantastic and I had to have them dig through a fresh cart to find mine. I'm in SLC, UT and the nursery was Millcreek Gardens. They told me that they get a decent selection and to check back every 7-10 days for the new arrivals. I'm not sure if my checkbook can handle that kind of exposure.


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New post for a picture album and a few questions.

In the album I showed the root ball of the two JM's. I was planning on moving to a bigger size container and going with the 5-1-1 mix. The reason why I thought to do this is because they have both leafed out and I don't want to cause too much stress on them. Is this a good plan of action? I was planning on going to a 3 gallon roottrapper bag I have on order. I also picked up a few 5 gallon used containers that I could use if that would work out better.

The autumn moon looks pretty droopy. I am thinking that this is probably from the location stress. I'm pretty sure the plant was trucked from Oregon/Washington to Utah this past week and it just needs a bit of time to acclimate.

I am planning on building a bench for my plants this weekend. I had thought to build it on an RV pad I have that faces direct east. This would give morning sun but no afternoon direct light. What I have read seems to suggest that this is just fine for JM's. I would love to just leave my seedlings out around my yard but my dogs (one kept wandering around while I was taking pictures, she is the naughty one) would eat them in no time at all. Have any of you guys built a potting bench/table for your trees? Any thoughts on what you like with yours or what you would have done different if you have one?

In the 5-1-1 mix how necessary is the gypsum? I found agricultural lime is a smallish bag but only found gypsum in huge 50 lb bags. The last picture is my "pine bark." At the store it was labeled "soil prep conditioner" and doesn't have a content label. It smells like pine but looks to be a little smaller than what is recommended. Is it too small for this mix?

I planted a bunch of acorns in the two raised beds tonight as well. Northern Red Oak, Pin Oak, and Bur Oak. The Bur Oak Acorns were already sending out tap roots and I was pretty happy to be able to get them planted. I also have rootmaker containers (the 18 cell pot size, 1 gallon plastic, and 3 gallon roottrapper bags) on their way. I am hoping to use the 5-1-1 mix for those containers as well and plant up the rest of my acorns and the rest of my Bur Oak seedlings. I am going nuts but am excited to be in a position to be doing this.

Here is a link that might be useful: JM Album


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Most of the literature I've read suggest that JM don't like their roots disturbed while they are in leaf. Although I seem to remember reading a couple of web sites where they root prune after the leaves have emerged, I believe those were pretty much all Trident Maples (Acer buergerianum) which seem to be much more forgiving than some of the others. That being said, I believe Al has stated previously how much root pruning a tree will take is largely dependent on how healthy the tree was prior to going dormant. That said, I don't mess with the roots once they're in leaf. All trees I purchase after the tree is in leaf get left in the nursery pot until the following year. If I own instead of rented, I'd plant them all. I'm really a container gardener by necessity, but man I love it.

All the above not withstanding, I think at this point you've got a couple of options.

(1) While the trees' roots are beginning to circle the pots, they don't look as root bound as some I've opened up. Your first option is to leave the trees alone this year. From the pictures the soil appears to be bark based (ie more bark than loam) and with carefully attention you can get the trees through this year just as they are. As stated above, I leave all trees purchased after they are in leaf in the nursery pots they come. Last year I had to be more careful about watering these pots and I always tipped them up on their side after watering to reduce the perched water table in the container, but I was able to get many trees through the year that way.
(2) You can plant the trees for this year (or longer if you wish). Many bonsai trees start in the ground to get good thick trunks prior to beginning the shaping process.
(3) You can pot up with a very similar mix. I wouldn't necessarily got with the 5-1-1 mix. Even though the 5-1-1 mix isn't as open as the 1-1-1 mix, it is still way more freely draining than most nursery mixes. This mix the tree is currently in is probably a mixture of bark, sand, perlite and loam. I don't like this option very much honestly, but it could work. If you go this route, don't go any more than one size up on the container (ie 1 gallon to 2 gallon). Any more and you could cause a stagnant area (wet soil/no roots to pull wetness out of soil).

If you have an east facing spot where the trees will get morning sun and afternoon shade and you own your home, I'd plant the trees for this year. You can put a tomato cage or deer netting around the trees to protect them from the dogs.

I'm not sure, but I believe Salt Lake City gets pretty warm in the summer, so you'll need to watch the Autumn Moon.

For right now I wouldn't worry about the general droopy looking nature. When the shoots first appear the leaves and shoots are droopy. The leaves and shoots should begin to harden off over the next 2 or 3 weeks.

I use Foliage Pro to fertilize my trees and have never made a batch of the 5-1-1 mix (I always use the 1-1-1 mix) so I forget exactly how it goes, but I think the lime lowers pH. If you use gypsum it doesn't effect pH but you have to add epsom salts when you water, I think. Maybe Josh or Al will chip in and correct me if I'm wrong. If you fertilize with Foliage Pro, it has all the essential elements and you don't need to add gypsum and epsom salts.

About the benches, I know many bonsai are set out on benches/platforms in the yard to grow, so that could work, depending on how large you want the trees to get.

Hope this helps.

Blake


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RE:Soil Conditioner

Just realized I missed one of your questions.

To prevent a perched water table, the smallest particle size is 1/16". If you have particles smaller than that you should screen your soil conditioner.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

hi sanctified, I actually have been growing oaks from acorns this year also :) I have 12 White Oak and 6 Shumard Oak and 2 Scarlet Oak (very red fall color) and 4 other red oak.. I'd love to find some Bur Oak acorns but not sure how well they would grow in my area or if they even do. I collected the acorns last fall and kept them in frig and just got them started in pots. The only thing about oaks is they are VERY Slow growers :( so if you do plant them out in your yard it will be at least approx 10 to fifteen yrs before they have good size (maybe 15 to 20 ft) at least this is what I've read.. Im growing them because even though I may not be around to see them at adult stage, to me they are awesome trees.
Now back to the maples.. I've been so busy lately with family and work I havent been able to do much picture uploading but my trees are doing well and hope to have pics up soon.

Great looking trees Blake and hope we have a Great Growing Season :)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Josh-
I got all my acorns from Acorno.com. I bought the sample packs for about $2 each. They sent a lot more that the stated 25, and after float testing them I found that I had a lot more than 25 "good" burs and northern reds each. I only had a few pins that sank like they ought to but was more interested in the others anyway.

I am growing them for the same reason. I love big trees. I have room for only a few mature oaks in my yard but plan to plant a lot and thin them out with time. I thought that since I was going to try to grow some from acorn I could try to get a few to bonsai and maybe a few in larger pots.

Everything I have read about Bur Oaks are that they are hardy from zone 3-8. I am a 5 or 6, but a local extension wrote an article a few years ago saying that more people should plant them here because even though they aren't native they do very well.

I do have a columnar english oak that is a few years old that has already produced acorns. I didn't think to plant them until the spring and by then all of the dropped acorns had spoiled. I'll be ready though this fall.

Someone said that you don't plant oak trees for your benefit but for the benefit of your children. If these acorns grown well I am going to pass them out to all my neighbors and ask them to plant them. The only thing I don't like about my neighborhood is that there aren't any mature trees because the houses are just a few years old.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Sorry sanctified,

I did a little more research during lunch and found out lime raises pH. The reason for adding lime to the 5-1-1 mix is to get calcium and magnesium, which many fertilizers don't include, into the soil. The trade off is the lime will raise the soil's pH. Because the 5-1-1 mix is mostly bark and bark is acidic, the addition of the lime reduces the 5-1-1's acidity along with adding calcium and magnesium. For most plants this is okay, but with plants that like a fairly acidic soil (Japanese Maples, Rhododendrons, Camellias, Azaleas, etc) we want to keep the acidity of the 5-1-1 and 1-1-1 mixes. In those cases we can add gypsum (doesn't effect the pH) to the mix and then add epsom salts to our water. This gets calcium and magnesium to the plants without raising the pH of the gritty mixes. The other option is to use a fertilizer with the proper mix of nutrients in the appropriate levels (such as Foliage Pro or adding micro nutrients to an appropriate fertilizer such as adding Pro-Tekt to the All Purpose 24-8-16 Miracle Grow)

Sorry about the misinformation I posted last night. It was late and I should have waited until I had time to more thoroughly proof my answer.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Sanctified- we're in the same boat as far as new neighborhood and zero mature trees.. im fortunate to live in an area with tons of oaks species and can collect seeds as I wish but I may order some Bur if im unable to find any this year, thanks for the website.

Also the float test isnt always 100% percent accurate i read so i went ahead and planted all my acorns and a lot of floaters still grew (especially with the pin oak) so you may wanna try them anyway. I've also collected some Red Maples this month and they are sprouting out just this week.

Blake- I ordered Deborah Koreshaff's book and so far its great, thanks for the tip :)


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Yep, I thought it was a good book also. Good information, good diagrams, reads well, etc. Glad you're enjoying it.

The thanks really go to Al (tapla). He's the one who recommended the book to me.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Been cold and wet again this week...the meteorologist call it a La Nina spring, I call it more awful than a normal Western Washington spring. After 10 years, I've just about gotten used to the dreary winters, but this time of year as winter drags on and on and on, I get really antsy for some blue sky and warmer temps.

Today was one of those rare beautiful spring days...bluebird skies and temps in the 60's, and my trees absolutely loved it.

With the colder than normal winter and a spring that's been more like winter, my little maples are a little slower getting into leaf this year than last. However, with a few nicer days over the last couple of weeks and an absolutely beautiful day today, they are finally showing some real signs of breaking dormancy.

Here's a few pics of the young leaves and another update on the Shishio hime which is leaps and bounds ahead of most of the other trees.

Peaches n Cream just beginning to unfurl
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Fire glow
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This tree was sold to me as a Villa Taranto, but it's never shown any red at all. After comparing it to some trees in a Japanese garden in Seattle over the course of last year and early this spring, I believe this tree to actually be a Koto no ito.
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My little Aureum...when I bought this tree last year the graft still hadn't healed all the way. I was encouraged to see every bud on the tree open with healthy new shoots.
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Here's the Shishio hime from over head and a close up of the leaves.
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Here's an Ukigumo I just bought this spring...it's leaves are just starting to unfurl...they will be varying degrees of variegated white and green...I've got the tree in a little flower and rock garden on the north side of a slotted fence in an attempt to keep as much direct sun off the tree as possible. In dappled/high shade, I've read, this tree should have more white than green in the leaves giving the appearance of a white cloud floating in the garden. I've seen one of these in heavy shade at another Japanese garden in Seattle, and it does indeed give the appearance of a cloud floating in the sea of green surrounding it.
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Here's very young leaves on my wife's Green Trompenburg, which oddly enough have come out very red this spring. These leaves look much more like red "Trompenburg". Vertrees' "Japanese Maples" suggest the Green Trompenburg was developed from "open pollinated" seeds. I wonder if this little tree is going to revert to what appears to be one of the parent trees. Time will tell.
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This next set of pictures shows closeups of the variety of colors on my new Aka shigitatsu sawa...the first with lots of pink in the entire leaf, the second with the characteristic pink in the palm, and the third with little or no pink at all.
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Here's one of the "pom pom" clusters from the Shishigashira
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Last for this update but not least is my little Shaina. This compact witches' broom shrub grows slowly but holds it's reddish to maroon color well all year. My tree was bought late in the winter, when it unexpectedly showed up in a nursery I frequent. The graft still shows quite prominently on this little tree, but it has a very nice shape and was the first under $200 I had seen in this area. So I snatched it up and am hopeful I can get it happily and healthily through a few seasons until I'm more confident the graft took well and the tree will survive. Oh well, that's the risk I take to get a very nicely shaped young tree at $25.
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I noticed when I came in this evening that a few more trees had leaves escaping their winter protective bud shells, so maybe I'll have a few more to post tomorrow.

Hope you enjoyed, and let's see some of that spring growth from some of your trees.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Noticed when I came home for lunch today, what appears (based on height damage) to be deer damage on a couple of trees and all but one leaf stripped off of the Green Trompenburg. Hope that tree survives. As for the others, we'll see how they recover.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

They look good, I built a potting bench this last weekend and planted the rest of my oak seedlings and acorns. I went to a local bonsai class on Saturday where they recommended getting some Trident and Amur maples to play with while my oaks are starting out. I looked at some today but didn't buy anything.

My autumn full maple is still really droopy but I'm hoping it will pull out of it still. We have had a hot streak (last three days 80+ with a couple more to go) that I'm sure isn't helping much.

I'm working late tonight but will try to get some pictures up tomorrow of my new potting/plant bench.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

As promised here is an album of my potting bench with my seedling and acorn trays. These are all from the RootMaker product line. I was a little worried about the big holes in the smaller cups but they seemed to hold the 511 mix pretty well. The best part is that the bench only cost me about $10 since I had a bunch of the wood laying around left over from other projects.

The bench faces east so they are shielded from the hot afternoon sun. I am going to a local Bonsai club tomorrow and may take one of the seedlings with me to get some tips on starting to wire the trunk while it is still real small. We'll see.

Here is a link that might be useful: Potting Bench Album


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Been a while and as we all know Japanese maples seem to change weekly during the spring, so here's some updated photos of some of my trees. Most of these are progressing nicely, building into an over all shape with layering both vertically and horizontally that I want. That said I don't have any "finished" or ready to show trees, so you may have to use your imagination on some and think how they would look a couple of years from now as they continue to grow in.

Coralinum: one of my favorites in my collection...didn't get a top down and it still isn't in full leaf (been cooler and wetter than normal, and that's saying something for western Washington)
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Ornatum: no top down (it's too tall without a ladder and I didn't feel like dragging one out) but this pic shows the vertical layering well
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Shaina: small dwarf with leaf clusters closely clumped to limbs
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Shaina top down view
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Autumn Moon
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Autumn Moon top down view
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Peaches n Cream
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Peaches n Cream top down view
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Koto no ito
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Koto no ito top down view
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Tamukeyama: Really developing the shape I wanted it to.
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Tamukeyama top down view
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Red Crusader: this one needs to develop some more layering lower on the left hand side.
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Red Crusader top down view: you can see a hole in the top side
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Shishio hime: I posted this one last night on Al's "Trees in Containers" thread and after viewing it there decided to remove some of the growth on the upper left side. I think this was a good pruning cut. I has left the left side a little undeveloped for now, but as it grows in over the next 3-5 years, it will be better balanced.
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Shishio hime top down view: here you can see it needs more development on the side near my feet and on my left (the top in the picture)
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Hope you enjoy seeing as much as I always enjoy growing and keeping track of these tree's growth.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Newest addition...

It's a tiny little dwarf named Beni Hoshi (reported to mean
"Red Star")...it'll get about 6' at maturity but is reported to be a very slow grower.

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Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Great updates, Blake!
The early growth on my Trident was covered in snow and subsequently frozen black.
Now, the growth is coming in nicely...but it was set back by a month at the least.
The good news is that the die-back on top caused budding lower down on the trunk,
so now I have a whole set of new low branches to begin developing.


Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I have a japanese maple ~20 feet tall (and probably never pruned) in my front yard. Can i grow another one from the wing looking seeds currently falling off the tree? Anything special i need to know about it? Just wet the seeds and put into soil.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Honestly, being mainly interested in known cultivars (grown by grafting trees onto root stock versus growing from seed), I've never tried or even researched growing maples of any variety from seed. I believe the seeds have to reach a certain chill requirement before they'll germinate.

I did a quick search and found this thread. Maybe that'll be of some help to you.

Blake

Here is a link that might be useful: Acers from seed


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Second Sensu in two years showing signs of being very unhappy. Actually, last year the Sensu went down hill very slowly. This year the young leaves turned black and shriveled up overnight.

Not sure if I'm just unlucky with the specific examples of this cultivar I've purchased, if this cultivar just doesn't like it's roots to be messed with, doesn't do well with bud pinching or what.

In both cases, the trees sent out vibrant new shoots and leaves and look good for several weeks to a month after bud swell. In this year's tree, the leaves went from looking good to black and withered overnight after I pinched the buds in the upper most shoots back to two nodes.

I think this is largely coincidence as even the leaves and shoots that were left to grow shriveled and died.

Other than winter freezing/icing damage (my own fault for not getting the very tender trees into the garage prior to last winter's snow/ice storm) these two Sensus are the only one's that haven't seemed very happy with the methods I'm applying.

I haven't read anything to indicate that Sensu is any more fragile than my other trees.

I'm wondering if I should just leave this cultivar alone until I get more experience under my belt, but I love this little "moving fan" species.

Maybe if I spent a little extra money to get a more established specimen...

Decisions, decisions

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Some more new additions.

Kasagi yama

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Close up of Kasagi yama leaf

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Beni ubi gohon

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Beni ubi gohon after pruning

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Sorry, I didn't take any pictures of the Kasagi yama prior to thinning.

I did some searching for additional information on the hardiness of Acer Shirasawanum Sensu on the web. Really didn't find anything conclusive. Talked to my local nurseryman today (I trust him). He said when young the Sensu is a fairly sensitive tree and can go downhill very quickly (as I've found). If I try this cultivar again, I will make sure it is a larger more established tree.

My Autumn Moon was looking droopy this afternoon. I moved it into more shade and it perked up within about a half an hour, so I think I just had it in too much sun. We've had a drastic change from cooler and wetter than normal to much hotter than normal over the last week. This quick change in weather may be causing some form of shock in the more sensitive trees as well. So far, the couple that have shown signs of heat stress (general droopiness, curling on the edges of the youngest leaves, etc) have perked back up and seem to be doing well after being moved into a more shady part of the yard.

Anyway, I'm up to 21 Acers now, and I'm really surprised by how many shades of green and red there really are. Seems like not one tree has the same color of green or red as any other tree.

As always, hope you enjoyed the update as much as I enjoy growing and shaping these wonderful little trees.

I'll try to post an update showing some of the color change this spring later this week or this weekend.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Excellent additions, Blake!
I did the first branch pruning of the season on my Trident this past weekend, and now
I'm waiting for more leaves before I snip the tips of other branches.

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Wondering if anyone else has ever tried to pinch buds on any Acer shirasawanums. The reason I ask, is I've had 2 Acer shirasawanum Sensus that have died on my in the last 2 years. In both cases the trees were looking very strong until I pinched the buds out on the new shoots after 2 sets of new leaves on each new shoot. Within a couple weeks of pinching the buds off the new shoots, both trees began showing signs of distress and both trees were completely dead within a month of bud pinching. Maybe coincidental?

Now for additional circumstantially evidence. A week or so ago I had an Acer shirasawanum Autumn Moon that was growing very strongly and look beautiful. I pinched several of the longest shoots in the top of the tree and now the tree looks distressed, ie droopy leaf stalks, just like both Acer shirasawanum Sensus.

It continues to be wet here in western WA and my first thought was the nursery soil the tree is in my be too wet, but my other two shirasawanums, both of which have been in the same wet weather as the Sensu which died earlier this year and the Autumn Moon which isn't looking good now, look fine.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Well I think it must have been coincidence or possibly the tree was right on the edge of being stressed from being too wet and when I pinched the buds the little extra stress pushed it into showing its stress.

The "show piece" Autumn Moon wasn't looking any better today, so I decided to plant it next to an Autumn Moon that was storm damaged last winter. The broken Autumn Moon has been doing really well in the corner of the yard where I decided to plant it and see if it would recuperate from last winter's storm damage.

At any rate, since the "show piece" Autumn Moon (just bought this spring, after leaf out so no chance to get it out of the nursery soil) was looking pour, I decided to plant it. My thinking was that the nursery soil was too water retentive and with our really wet spring (and that's saying a lot when you live in western WA) the tree was showing signs of over watering.

When I pulled the tree out of the black plastic nursery pot, the soil was literally dripping water off the bottom. So it's planted now and maybe it'll do better atleast for this year and I can dig it up next year, root prune and plant in a nice container.

We'll see how it goes.

Last year when I lost my Sensu, I swore I would learn what it took to diagnose problems and keep my trees happy. I was very disappointed in myself when I lost another Sensu earlier this spring. I'm encouraged that I was able to diagnose the likely problem with the Autumn Moon based on my research from last year. Hopefully, I've taken a step that will help the tree recuperate and get healthy again.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hey, Blake, sorry about the losses...
but I'm glad that you've diagnosed the issues.
Good luck with your next Sensu ;-)

Josh


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Thanks Josh.

My idea when I started this thread was to follow the development of my trees over time and hopefully to follow my own development as I learned how to take care of these little maples.

With that in mind, I've tried to post not only my successes but also my failures.

Today, unfortunately, I have another failure to post. It has been quite wet and much cooler than an average year this spring. With all the cloudy days and drizzle, I admit that I haven't check the moisture level of the soils in my tree containers as much as I would if it were drier. Well, Saturday while moving my trees around so I could mow the lawn I noticed that another one of my trees (purchased too late this spring to move to the gritty mix)was looking bad (dry cupped leaves with brown tips). I immediately got a bamboo stick and tested the moisture in the pot. To my horror, I discovered that only about the top inch of soil was moist and below that it was bone dry. I checked all the trees and most of them needed watering.

I again checked the tree with dry leaves on Sunday and approximately the outer 1/3 of the leaves were brown and crinkly.

So looks like I've killed yet another one this year.

That's one last year and three this year. Maybe that's the cost of doing business for a beginner, but I just can't accept that as the truth. And this time there's no doubt, it was my fault.

So use this as a cautionary tale and check the moisture level in your pots even when it's rainy or drizzly. They may not be getting enough moisture from light drizzle or they may be getting too wet.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

I have had a beautiful Acer in a pot since 2004. When I bought it, it was @ 4 foot tall. My husband has been telling me that it will die if I don't put it in the ground (he isn't a gardening guru like yourselves:) so I would rather go with my gut instinct!) I have been very fortunate with growing plants in the past and decided to take action with my 'not so little any-more' acer. I fed her with slow release fertiliser, pruned her back to 'a pretty shape' (I'm a woman!) and she is now looking rather good. I will take a pic and post it (hopefully tomorrow when the weather is better). I did stuff one thing up in the pruning though (sorry)...I pruned new wood, and my mother tree has been crying ever since. Even stranger, the 'limb' that I removed (and placed in water outside, but sheltered) is continuing to bud and flower! Any tips on how I should tackle transferring this to a pot? I had thought of using some growth hormone on the exposed cut and plunging in to either water or some well draining soil with perhaps a bag around it to maintain humidity...been reading other people's posts as I haven't found anything advising how I should strike an Acer like this...any advice please? Dawn


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Visited Bunnings this morning for some growth hormone for the cutting in the cat's water bowl. Following a chat with the lovely assistant, I settled on "Multicrop Plant Starter". The advice is to stand cuttings in 2cm of undiluted liquid for 24hours before planting, so I found a jar (not hard as I have tonnes of them!) and carefully measured out 2cm of the liquid. When I retrieved the cutting from the cat's bowl, would you believe it (?), it already had a root on it! I am following the advice on the bottle in any case and will be planting the cutting tomorrow...weather permitting. It's a beautiful day today, so will take a photo of both mother tree and baby for posting later :) Dawn


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Dawn,

As you well know by now Acers adapt quite well to container life. You should know though that to continue being healthy long term, your Acer will need root pruning periodically. For maximum health you might consider moving your Acer into one of the soil less mixtures described in these forums.

I've never tried growing an Acer from a cutting. However, I know a couple of the guys on here have had good luck growing the Tridents from cuttings.

Sounds like you're well on your way with your cutting.

Would love to see pictures of the tree.

Blake


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Hi Blake,
Been raining most of today and I didn't manage to strike my cutting yesterday as I was busy trying to save my conifers from canker! Lots of water, feed and mulch - the trees came with the house and have never had any care...until now. As soon as we have another few clear days, I will locate the damage and treat with meths and tree paint...I think that it could be possum damage that is making them stressed unfortunately, but I will be able to see more when I scale them. Back to the acers update! I think that I left the cutting in the rooting hormone too long because when I removed it to plant it in its first container, the root had dropped off...I planted and staked the cutting anyway and am praying that it takes. I saw a tip from another forum with regard to the open wound left behind on a mother plant that is weeping and covered it with vaseline (petroleum jelly)...it seems to be doing the trick...will include a photo of the cut tomorrow too as the weather (I believe) is going to be good.


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Managed to take a 'few' photos. The first few are of the 'Mother plant' with potted colour around the base of the trunk, but not planted as I don't want them to compete with the Mother Acer for nutrients. I have also included the 'wound' that I dressed with vodka (not meths as I realised that I had run out!) and then vaseline. If you can make it out, you can see that the weeping has stopped completely. The second set of photos, are of the 'Baby Acer', on Days 1 and 2 with close ups of the foliage


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Mother Tree and potted colour 22.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Mother Acer 'Wound' 22.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer, Day 1 from planting, 22.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up, Day 1 from Planting 22.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Day 1, 22.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Day 2 from Planting, 23.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Overhead, Day 2 from planting, 23.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up, Day 2 from planting, 23.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Day 3 from Planting, 24.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Overhead, Day 3 from Planting 24.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up, Day 3 from planting, 24.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Day 4 from Planting, 25.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Overhead, Day 4 from Planting 25.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up 1, Day 4 from planting, 25.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up 2, Day 4 from planting, 25.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up 3, Day 4 from planting, 25.9.12


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RE: A Journal for following the development of Containerized Mapl

Baby Acer - Foliage Close-up 4, Day 4 from planting, 25.9.12


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