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Do two types of corn in the same area produce two distinct types?

Posted by srj19 4 (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 19, 12 at 1:30

Hi,

I'm wanting to plant two types of corn together since I don't have a lot of space or conditions to grow them apart.

Will the resulting corn immediatley be a cross of the two at this point or will the plant grown from these new seeds of the crop be the ones that produce a new plant and new cross?


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RE: Do two types of corn in the same area produce two distinct ty

The kernels of corn ARE the next generation. Say your're growing varities A & B. If they are right next to each other, on plant A, some kernels will be A x A, because it pollinated itself, and some will be A x B, because they were pollinated by B's pollen. B will have a mix of B x B and B x A kernels.

Now, it may be hard to tell these apart, or it may be easy. Depends on what visual traits each parent has. Or other traits.

You will generally be alright as long as you keep within the same class -- it's ok to plant two su corns togther, two se corns, of two Sh2 corn. It's when you mix between the two that you could potentially get undesirable outcomes, such as very tough, starchy kernels.


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RE: Do two types of corn in the same area produce two distinct ty

Will the resulting corn immediatley be a cross of the two at this point

Yes. As denninmi said corn is rather unique in the cross pollination world since it is the seeds you are eating. So you will get mixed results depending on the characteristics of the 2 you plant. Mixed colors (if your 2 are different color), mixed kernel sizes, mixed ear sizes, and it won't be the true variety flavor on either.

Check the DTM on your varieties and plant them so that they are not in tassel (pollinating) at the same time.

Dave


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RE: Do two types of corn in the same area produce two distinct ty

  • Posted by RpR_ none (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 28, 12 at 0:04

I have been planting four to eight types of corn in a garden of thirty by eighteen with rarely more than three feet separating stands for decades.

They have been white. yellow, green. red, blue and a few others.

The amount of crossing has been minimul, mostly on the outer rows but you should avoid types that come ripe at the same time, or plant a week to ten days apart to avoid heavy crossing.

If you have short and tall corns, make sure the short comes ripe earliest.

I also plant in methods that cross the T.

Now if you are planting for seed saving, that is a different story.


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RE: Do two types of corn in the same area produce two distinct ty

Ok so maybe it would work to grow a hybrid and some country gentleman at the same time.

What was that resource for checking the pollination window?

One other question, do you guys hand pollinate or what? Last year I grew more corn than I ever have, probably 10-12 rows with 10-12 stalks per row and I got 2 mature ears. I did attempt to hand polinate to give me some insurance that they'd produce. What's the deal?


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