Return to the Vegetable Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
When to plant outside DFW Texas

Posted by Syntria 8a (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 16, 14 at 20:59

Hello everyone!

So I've got two of my raised beds built and filled, 4x8 and have 6 more to build.

I've got some brussel sprouts, lettuces pre-grown and seeds, beets, potatoes, strawberries, spinage, chard, and others--can I get going on all these? I'm scared of a sudden hard freeze or should I be in the clear by now? Some people even told me we had some freezes last year in late april!

Also included is a picture of all my tomatoes and peppers I've started indoors--and some are over a foot high now. So proud of them. Wish I had more room, not happy with how many peppers I have. Made the mistake of starting a few things too early, like my cucumbers--I'm thinking I might start a tray of them now though since the timing will be better.

What are some veggies I can start now to start getting edible produce? Lettuces seem like the biggest thing. I already have some Kale that lasted thru the winter (did fantastic!)


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: When to plant outside DFW Texas

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 16, 14 at 21:24

Your last frost date is supposedly Mar. 10-20 th depending on your actual location - lots of places on line to find that info. But of course there are never any guarantees so with any spring planting you have to be prepared to cover if a late frost happens and you have to monitor the weather forecasts closely. That is true for all of us..

But you can take the average of that date - say today - and enter it into any of the many planting guides and it will give your planting out dates specific to your area. I linked one of many of them below. Suggest you bookmark it for future ref.

brussel sprouts, lettuces pre-grown and seeds, beets, potatoes, strawberries, spinage, chard, and others

Those wouldn't all be planted at the same time anyway. Brussel Sprouts require a frost before harvesting so in the south they are normally started in mid to late summer for late fall harvesting.

Potatoes yes as it is already planting time up here and they won't be up for a couple of weeks. Spinach, chard, could probably be planted since the seeds won't be up for another week anyway but cover may be needed.. Lettuce I'd wait another week. Peppers and tomatoes - way too early for them.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: Planting calendar


 o
RE: When to plant outside DFW Texas

With pepper and tomatoes:

1) it has to be passed your LFD. (or extended forecast is favorable)
2) Night lows are not lower than 40F
3) you have already hardened off your pepps and maters.

With cool crops, in your zone, you could have done it long time ago.


 o
RE: When to plant outside DFW Texas

Google for "my last frost date" and then Google for a Dallas/Ft Worth Planting Guide. The guide will give you very good information about what to plant and when. If you are starting your own seeds (good for you!) you should count back 6 to 8 weeks from the planting date and sow your seeds then. As you are already learning, it's a very bad idea to start seeds too early.

Cucumbers will do great (better than in pots) if you just sow them directly in the ground when your soil warms up. That is typically a couple weeks after your last frost date. Put your bare hand on the soil. If it feels cold, it's too soon. Honest. It's that simple.

FYI, I live in east central MS, which is a fairly similar climate to yours. I have lettuce seeds up and growing in pots on my deck right now. Should have some to eat in mid to late April. I like to sow a few every two or three weeks so I have a steady supply for as long as the cooler temps hang around.In my raised beds, I have sugar snap peas (sowed in mid February), onions and garlic (planted last November), Kale and Collard's (seeds started last summer and plants put in ground in mid fall), and my second sowing of carrots. (first crop was sowed last fall. We finished them in early Feb.. I planted more in mid February).

I'll be planting warm weather vegetables in mid April, weather permitting. That means I'll be able to look at a ten day forecast and see NO night temperatures below 55 degrees. And, the soil will feel warm to my hand.
Hope this helps.


 o
RE: When to plant outside DFW Texas

I'll be planting warm weather vegetables in mid April, weather permitting. That means I'll be able to look at a ten day forecast and see NO night temperatures below 55 degrees
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

If I had to do that( Night lows 55F+) I would have to wait til July.

Here I will be happy with 42F+ night lows. Tomatoes can even tolerate 38F+. But peppers maybe 45F+


 o
RE: When to plant outside DFW Texas

Mother earth news has a free planting guide where you put in your zip code and it tells you when to plant what. You can put in your email and they'll send you notices to your email. It's kind of cool.

Here is a link that might be useful: mother earth plant guide


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Vegetable Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here